North Carolina Newspapers

    h
'Fit'
eOtt,
%■
hv
ro«j-'
'etfit.
leti
tlfi.:
ffllg:
'W'
II-
fill!
lii!
*
Junior
Issue
HIGH LIFE
From the Gate City of the South and the Birthplace of O. Henry
VOLUME VIII
GREENSBORO HIGH SCHOOL,MARCH 30, 1928
NUMBER 13
S.lP.A.HOlDSTfflRD
ANNUAL CONVENTION
LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA
Will Discuss Problems Pertain
ing to the Ethics of
Journalism
round table discussion
Feature Banquet Announced as Climax
of Convention Held May 12 Prof.
Ellard is Convention Director
Commencement Plans
Dick Douglas, senior president,
and senior class advisers have
planned and arranged the senior
class commencement schedule.
Senior examinations start May 2.3.
Baccalaureate sermon, May 27.
Class day exercises. May 31.
Commencement exercises, June 1.
(Speaker not yet secured).
Regular examinations. May 28.
Lexington, Ya., March 10. 1 he third
annual convention of the Southern
Inter-scholastic Press Association will
meet May 11 and 12, at Washington
and Lee University, the Lee Journal
ism School announced today.
Under the direction of the School ol
Journalism, assisted by Pi Delta Ep
silon, national honorary jouralistic fra
ternity, AYashingtcn and Lee Univer
sity has entertained high and prepara
tory school teachers, publication ad
visers and secondary school editors foi
the last three years, for a two-day
practical discussion of problems per
taining to the ethics and practice of
journalism in secondary schools.
Delegates from high and preparatorj-
schools all over the South will assem
ble in Lexington for two full days.
Prominent speakers on various phases
of journalism will present their views
to the young editors, and the profes
sion of journalism will be viewed from
both the angle of the technician and
that of the layman.
Round table discussions will be con
ducted and all aspects of newspaper
work considered. Contests will be
opened to the various schools and
prizes will be presented for the best
newspapers, magazines and annuals en
tered in two classes; the class to be
determined by the size of the school
issuing the publication.
JUNIORS MEET FOR
PLANNING BANQUET
Committees Are Appointed by
President to Begin Work
Immediately
CLASS MEETING FRIDAY
TEACHERS GATHER IN
ANNUAL ASSOCIATION
AT STATE CAPITAL
Meeting Divided in Sections for
Deans, Principals, and Dif
ferent Teachers
LOCAL PEOPLE PRESENT
Open Forum Arranged in Order That
Questions Pertaining to Work
May Be Answered
MISS MARY MORROW
WILL ATTEND MEETING
Miss Mary Morrow, math teacher
at G. H. S., will attend the Physi
cal Educational Association meet
ing at Atlanta on April 11. Miss
The annual meeting of the North
HIGH STUDENTS’ PRESS
ASSOCIATION TO MEET
Second Annual Affair to Be Held in
Asheville the First Week
in May
The North Carolina High School
Students Press Association will meet
in Asheville the first week in May.
This is the second annual meeting of
the press association. Last year the
meeting was held in Raleigh under the
direction of Mrs. Nina Holland Cox-
ington, instructor of .Journalism at the
Hugh Morson High School. At this
time it was decided to make the meet
ing an annual affair. .Jack Brooks
was elected president, .J. D. McNairy,
vice-president, and Carlton Wilder,
chairman of the ways and means com
mittee.
Delegates from North Carolina,
South Carolina, and Virginia will at
tend the association.
The officers of the junior class and
junior-senior committee met Tuesday
afternoon, March 13, to discuss plans
for the spring banquet.
There are 19 members of the junior
class who came from Pomona. They
have transferred their class dues with
those of Central High.
At a class meeting Friday, March IG,
C. lY. Phillips discussed plans with the
juniors. Charles Rives, class president,
appointed committees, as follows;
Transportation, Harold Cone, chair
man, and Ervin Stone, assisting; en
tertainment, Clyde Norcom, chairman,
Virginia Wade, Carmen I’atterson,
IMary Imet T^nderwood, and Carl Jones;
music, Charles Wilhalm, chairman,
Charles Crews, Dorothy Johnson; in
vitations, Gladys Fisher, chairman, and
Eugene Curtis and Imuis Brooks will
assist; finance, Bobby Scott, chairman,
Mary Hoyle, Malisse Mullens, Henry
Weiland, Emma Hardee; placement.
Marguerite Wells, chairman, Catherine
Sykes, Frances Burch, Max Holland,
and Elizabeth Hester; programs. Bill
Troxell, chairman, Bernard Ahman,
Charles Rives, and Ruth McQuaige;
favors, Nancy Hay, chairman, Edna
Sockwell, Elizabeth Bray, Catherine
Lambe, Mary Moore, and Elizabeth
Wood; decoration, Ruth Barton, chair
man, Mary Imuise l^atterson, Nannie
Bell Clendenin, Bill Tranter, and Bil
lie I’ayne.
FRENCH CLUB MEETS TO
ELECT NEW OFFICERS
At the meeting of the French Club
Monday, March 13, new officers were
elected a.s follows; President, Catherine
Murray; vice-president, Frances De-
Vault; secretary and treasurer, Sadie
Sharp; press reporter, Dorothy Don
nell.
At the meeting on Monday, March 27,
the program consisted of discussions
on “Cathedrals” by Margaret Sockwell
and Eugenia Isler. A special feature
was an account of the meeting of mod
ern language teachers at Raleigh by
Miss Estelle Mitchell.
MATH ASSOCIATION HAS
SIXTH ANNUAL MEETING
Professor G. E. Evans of Rice Institute,
Houston, Texas, Principal Speaker
at Convention
Carolina Teachers’ Association was held
at Raleigh, March 22, through the 24th.
The association was divided into the
following sections; deans and prin
cipals, high school teachers, grammar
grade teachers, and primary teachers.
Miss Sarah M. Sturtevant, professor
of Education, Teachers College, Colum
bia University, had charge of the meet
ings for the deans. Her general sub
ject was “The Office of the Dean of
Women.” At each meeting an open
forum gave the college deans, princi
pals, and superintendents an oppor
tunity to answer any questions pertain
ing to the work.
The following program governed the
meetings for deans and advisers:
Thursday, March 22, 8:30, executive
board meeting ; Friday, March 23, 9 :30-
10 :.30, business meeting; 10:30, Miss
Sturtevant; 2:30-3:30, sectional meet
ings ; 3:30-4:30, qviestion box hour;
6:.30, dinner; Saturday, March 24,
10:00-12:00, Miss Sturevant; 2 :.30-3 :.30,
election of officers and reports from
different sections.
Those who attended the meeting from
Greensboro High School were Charles
W. Phillips, principal, Fannie Starr
Mitchell, dean; Inly Walker, J^aura
Tillett, Jmcille Mercer, Estelle Mitch
ell, Amy Caldwell, Sara I^esey, Mrs.
Mary S. Ashford, and Mrs. Alma Cole-
trane.
The program for the council of Eng
lish teachers was an inspirational
meeting. The speakers secured for this
occasion dealt with things of the spirit,
the joy of tbe work, and the catching
of visions. Professor Jack Dunn. North
Carolina College for Women, spoke I^ri-
day afternoon on “Creative Writing.”
Dr. William J.ouise Poteat, president of
Wake Forest College, addressed the
council on the subject. “Wider Fellow
ship.”
Greensboro High School will also be
well represented at the State Associa
tion of Deans at Raleigh. Miss Fannie
Starr Mitchell, dean of girls at G.
H. S., will be a representative for G.
H. S.
Morrow will speak on “The Ath
letic Association for Girls in N. C.
High Schools.”
In 1921 a point system was
worked out by Miss Morrow and
was later submitted to the state
organization. The plan was adopt
ed and since then has been in use
in the state.
While at the convention Miss
Morrow will lead an old-fashioned
country dance following the get-
together at the Henry Grady hotel.
DR. ERNEST GROVES
SPEAKS TO P. T. A.
MEMBERS AT MEET
Believes Modern Trends in
Child Training Are Valuable
for Parent and Child
PRESS ASSOCIATION
MEETS IN NEW YORK
IS AUTHORITY ON SCIENCE
Dr. Groves Is Graduate of Harvard and
Yale—Formerly Professor of Bos
ton and New Hampshire
Editors Assemble at Columbia
for Two Full Days—Greens
boro Delegates Attend
WINNERS GIVEN RIBBONS
The Southeastern Section of the
Mathematical Association of America
will hold its sixth annual meeting in
the Science Hall of Duke University,
Durham, N. C., Friday and Saturday,
April 1.3-14. Miss lone Grogan, head
of G. H. S. Math department, and Miss
Mary Morrow, Math teacher, will rep
resent Greensboro High School at this
«
meetmg.
Anyone who is interested in Math
ematics has been invited by W. AV.
Rankin, chairman of the program com
mittee, to attend the entire program.
This includes the informal dinner in
honor of Professor G. C. Evans on Fri
day in the Duke Hotel. Professor
Evans, of Rice Institute, Houston,
Texas, will be the principal speaker.
His excellent work in this field has won
for him the honor of being starred
among the American Men of Science.
Those attending the meeting will be
entertained at luncheon as guests of
the Duke University immediately after
the program Saturday morning.
AUTHORS SUBMIT WORK
TO “QUILL AND SCROLL”
Send in News Articles, Essays and One-
Act Play—Contest Open to All
High School Students
The Columbia Interscholastic Press
Association Convention was conducted
this year along the same general prin
ciples as in the past. Two differences,
however, lay in the fact that the
awards were made to a group of three
or four in each classification rather
than to one, and that ribbons and
medals rather than loving cups were
awarded.
The boys from Greensboro attending
the convention, made the trip through
the country, arriving in New York
M'ednesday night, March 7th. The
girls went b.y train and arrived Thurs
day.
The most outstanding features were
the welcoming address by Dr. John
Finley, of the Xeic York Times, a dis
cussion of English and American news
papers, by S. K. Ratcliffe, of London;
and a luncheon for the entire delega
tion, given Saturday.
Among the most interesting things
seen by the delegates were the liner
Olympic, and the Museum of Natural
History, and Metropolitan Museum of
Art. Outstanding among the theatri
cal productions were “Capponsacchi,”
played by AAffilter Hampden; “Escape,”
John Galsworthy’s latest play, and
“Coquette,” a drama by Ann I’reston
Bridges, of North Carolina. “Good
News,” “Rio Rita,” and “Rosalie” were
among the best musical comedies seen.
The boys had a more or less unevent
ful trip both going and returning. One
puncture and an hour or so spent in
digging the car out of the mud were
the only mishaps experienced.
Although the convention lasted only
two days, the delegates were gone
nearly two weeks. During this time
they saw practically all the standard
sights of New York and nearly all of
the leading theatrical productions.
“Spare the rod and spoil the child”
has been changed in Greensboro to
“Spare the rod and study the child.”
Dr. Ernest R. Groves, research pro
fessor at the state university, and
national authority in the study of child
and family life, spoke on “Modern
Trends in Training the Child” before
a packed house Tuesday night, March
27, at Greensboro county courthouse.
This was in the interest of the child
study class of the Greensboro Congress
of Parents and Teachers. There are
105 now enrolled in the study, and each
week finds new members in the class.
Eight years ago the North Carolina
Congress of Parents and Teachers first
touched on the idea, when formulating
a state program, that the study of mod
ern trends in child training would be
immensely valuable for any type of
parent and all adults who come in daily
contact with children.
Greensboro is the only city at present
reaping the benefit of the idea. Local
women took the first pioneer step in
this field. They secured Mrs. Gladys
R. Groves, Chapel Hill, to conduct the
study classes. The classes are held
each M'ednesday at the Y. W. C. A.
Dr. Groves treated his subject in
finished style, being an authority, re
search worker, and a writer of some
dozen books touching vital life prob
lems. His lecture was not the theoriz-
kind, but instead his conclusions
in;
and observations were in simple home
ly phrases.
“The proper study of mankind is
man,” is for him a real working prin
cipal. The well-known lecturer at one
time desired to be a minister. He has
not changed his early aim for he se
lected “the ministry of science, the
teaching of people how to live and do
right.” He is convinced that the busi
ness of living is always complicated by
ignorance and he devotes his energy
to finding out and spreading informa
tion that might help make better
human beings, and more enjoyable life.
Dr. Groves is a graduate of both
Dartmouth and Yale and has been a
professor of New Hampshire and of
Boston.
Aliss Laura Tillett is sending several
articles by creative and journalistic
students to the “Quill and Scroll,” a
national honorary society of journal
ists. The society is conducting a con
test which is open to all high school
students.
The productions which Miss Tillett
has already selected are Irene McFad-
yen’s story, “A Piece of Paper,” which
has been highly commended by con
temporary writers; “A Farewell,” a
poem by Carlton AVilder, and a poem.
“In a Chapel,” by Dick Douglas.
Besides these selections some essays,
news articles, and one-act plays will
be entered. All material must be in
by April 1.
MUSIC CONTEST TO BE
AT N. C. C. AUDITORIUM
The annual state music contest will
be held in N. C. C. auditorium at
Greensboro on April 12-13. For the
past several years Greensboro has been
the guest of high school musicians
throughout the state. This year a
larger number of entrans are sched
uled, and, too, several new numbers
will be special features.
Central High is enrolling chorus and
contestants in practically every event.
H. Grady Miller, music director of G.
H. S., forecasts a successful year for
the local teams.
PROGRAM CHAIRMAN
ASKS EDITOR TO TALK
Davis Reed, Jr., chairman of the
program committee of the Southern In-
ter-Scbolastic Presss Association, has
written to the editor of High Life ask
ing him to make a talk at the conven
tion to be held in Alay.
He has been asked to talk on the
following points:
1. Accomplishments of your publica
tion during the past year.
2. Helpful material brought out at
the last convention which has been suc
cessfully utilized by your publication.
3. Any changes or innovations in the
departments of your publication since
last year.
Mr. Reed writes in his letter: “As
an editor of a prize-winning publica
tion at last year’s convention you are
requested to give a three-minute talk
before the convention this year.
■t
!(
(
; (!
I
i'
■I
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view