North Carolina Newspapers

    PAGE TWO
“HIGH” LIFE, MAECH 11, 1921.
“HIGH” LIFE
‘POE A GEBATEE G. H. S.”
Pounded by the class of ’21
Published Every Other Week by the Students of the Greensboro High School
Application for change of name from The Sage to “High Life,” with entry as
second-class matter at the Greensboro, N. C., post office, now pending.
Acoeplea for*mailing at special riite of postage provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917,
authorized December 10, 1920.
SUBSGEIPTION RATES:
5 Cents per Copy 50 Cents the School Year
Kenneth Lewis Editor-in-Chief
Alice Waynick I Managing Editors
Prances Harrison i
Hunter Eoane 1 Assignment Editors
Ruth Underwood /
Hoyte Boone Athletic Ediotr
Katherine Wharton Alumni ditjr
BUSINESS DEPARTMENT
Bertram Brown Business Manager
Dick “Wharton Asst. Business Manager
Fred Mans Circulation Manager
Archie Brown Asst. Circulation Manager
Look and see who makes this paper possible by advertising in-it, and then trade
with them.
EDITORIAL
JUNIORS ATTENTION!
Are we setting an example to the Sopho
mores and Freshmen by our conduct in
Chapel? Wliy they even behave better
than we do. We are the first ones to come
into chapel and you know if we come in
giggling and talking the other classes will
follow our example. Let us start the ex
excise right by coming quietly into ehapel.
Then the other classes will follow their
leader. -Let’s be one hundred per cent
strong in perfect ehapel behavior.
BASE-BALL
'Ihe baseball practice for the coming sea
son has just begun and from the looks
of things, it seems that the baseball team
representing G. H. S. this year will be as
good as the last year’s State Champions
big team.
There is a large number trying out for
the various positions, but there are not
as many as were expected to come out.
It seems as if the main object of these
boys now out practicing is to equal the
record made last year, and under the guid
ance of Mr. Phillips, our coach, this seems
possible.
When a fellow goes out for base ball
he .should not only consider the enjoyment
he derives from it but also the fact that
it helps him. It develops a boy mentally
and physically and w’hen I say it helps
him ■mentally I mean it helps him to think
more quickly and more accurately. Physi
cally it builds up his body and he enjoys
good health. It also occupies the time
that he would spend loafing or at some
thing not half as beneficial as base-ball.
college to take part 'in that 'of another col
lege were the main rules adopted.
If'the colleges think that it is necessary
to adopt stricter rqles^gOTerning the eligi
bility of men, in athletics, shouldn’t the
high schools at least look into the matter?
If these rules "were adopted by the high
schools, it would cause the' athletic con
testants to be more equalized; and'thus not
have boys of the right high school age play
ing boys in the twenties who have, failed
on their work for two or three years. Thus
the rule would prevent much of the tales
concerning “ringers” which is prevalent
in high school athletics of today, for in
fact, many of these so-called “ringers”
are only men who have failed on their work
and are still playing on high school teams
despite their age and size.
For this reason and this one alone it
would be a wise move for the high schools
to look into this matter, especially after
the colleges have taken such steps.
GREENSBORO’S NEW VENTURE IN
MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT
The new College Athletic uliugs w'ere
noted by us with interest. These rules
were drawn up by several southern col
leges and have been, set up by them to gov
ern the eligibility of college men in, ath
letics. The one year rule, which prevents
Freshmen from being on athletic teams;
the three year rule, wliieh permits men in
a four year college to be on athletic teams
for only three years; and the rule for
bidding men taking part in athletics in one
Greensboro became somewhat discont
ented with the commission form of munici
pal government because of its apparent
backwardness and unprogressiveness. On
March 1, the voters of the city unanimous
ly 'chose the council manager plan of
.mfinieipal govei-nment to supercede the
commission plan.
- The council manager plan is worked on
a basis very much like the big business cor
poration. The members of the council,
who are chosen by the people, correspond
to the board of directors of a business firm
and the manager, himself, to the manager
of a business firm. He is hired by the
council to supervise the civic health, civic
works and other departments of the city
government on a business-like basis and
not from a standpoint of political power
which is bound’-to arise in the commission
plan. . , . '
BOYS!
Always Remember:—
True; economy lies in buying the best and skipping the rest.
You get out of SHOES what the maker puts into them. Cheap
shoddy SHOES are most EXPENSI'YE in the END because of
their EARLY END. This is not a “JUST OUT” Store. We
have been in business more than thirty-two years; and last year
was the largest in our history, and feel that we can justly claim
to know something about SHOES. When you buy SHOES here
you get the benefit of our knowledge and experience. We are
all set for a big spring business. Are you with us?
J. M. HENDRIX & CO.
“The Home of Good Shoes’^
223 South Elm Street Greensboro, N. C.
, The business-like manner in which the
city manager plan is conducted ought to
make it less expensive and more efficient.
Any man with a good business head ought
to make a good city manager. One prom
ising thing about this plan is that if a
manager does not prove satisfactory the
council can discharg him at any time and
choose someone else in his place.
The general opinion of the people is very
optimistic in favor of this plan and with
its present “backing” it should prove very
successful.
THE NEED QF STUDENT’S GOVERN
MENT IN G. H. S.
Oilr country is democratic and all of
its citizens should work for the good of it.
Our school approach the monarchies of the
eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The
pupils are the subjects of such a monarch.
The object of our schools is to make good,
citizens for the country. Then why not
malve the government of our schools more
dmocratic? The future citizens of Ameri
ca will be we boys and girls, who' today
are going to school. Then why not start
while in school?
Have yon ever seen a person who, did
wrong and thinks he hasn’t a chance at
anything? Then have you ever heard that
this same person was given a chance on
hig' own accord to do btter that he made
good? Yes, all of us, perhaps, have known
this kind of person intimately.
When we are put on our honor to do
what we think is best for ourselves and
others, are we not going to do better ? This
one, fact can put Student Government on
a fine running basis in our school.
If you look about you, you will see
daily, things which are both disguesting
and demoralizing. Is our school to be
classed low because of its students con
stant use of lowly things ? No, Greens
boro High School has the material for one
of the finest schools in North Carolina, if
we only heed the things which are con
stantly coming in our pathways.
Student Government vs^ould not make
our school perfect, but it would help cor
rect some of these things, and make us a
better school. We Juniors a're trying to
put this system in 6. H. S., but we cannot
succeed alone. The success of this method ,
depends upon every individual as well as
the classes taken as a whole.
If we are for the best athletic teams and
debating teams, then, why not the best
government? Before long it will be the
privilege of the three upper classes to de
cide whether or not we adopt this system.
The Juniors are working hard for this^
to succeed. Won’t you help us?
If we suppor our school in other activi
ties, then, why not in government, for is
not the key to the success of all concerns
the management? The Junior Class with
the help of every student in the school can
make this one of the best govened schools
in the state. Are you with us for a bigger
and’better G. H. S.?
.'*1
    

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