North Carolina Newspapers

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September 9,1927
HIGH LIFE
Faye Three
SIX LOCAL BOYS ARE
ENROLLED IN CAMP
AT FORT BRAGG, N. C.
Routine of Day Similar to Reg
ular Army—Companies
Drilled 7:30 to 11:30
ON DUTY JUNE 14-JULY 11
Ben Wood, Lee Vanstory, Harvey Blue,
Marshall Barney, Glenn Gurley and
Harris Ogburn Attended Camp
G. 11. S. was represented at the Citi
zens :\Iilitary Training Camp at Fort
Bragg, .Time U-.Tiily 14, by six boys.
Those who attended were: Ben Wood.
Lee Vanstory, llarvcy Bine, Mjirshiill
Barney, Glenn Gurley, and Harris Og
burn.
The routine of the day was similar
to that of the regular army. The
hardest part of the work, according to
Ben Wood, was from 7 ;30 to 11 ;30.
At this time the companies drilled.
After this was completed nothing else
was reciuired of the boys except to
play games in the afternoon.
The camp had an excellent baseball
coach and also coaches in tr'acdc, tennis
and football for those intere.sted.
During the stay at camp each person
had to do Kitchen Police Duty for
one day. This was unanimously agreed
upon as the worst part of the camp.
Harris Ogburn said he didn't know the
potato crop was so large until he
jiealed spuds one day.
If a boy attends three seasons of this
cam]) he will receive a commission in
the li. O. T. C. This is a way to
train the American youth to be pre-
jiarcd in time of war and yet not have
to enlist in the army for any time
whatsoever.
BILL BYERS WINS
MORRIS PLAN CONTEST
$25 Leposit For First Prize; SIO For
Second; $5 For Third Place—Held
Last May
A tirst prize, consisting of a bank
a‘count was awarded Bill Byers, May
.30. in the Jiorris Plan Bank ad con
test. The second prize, a iplO bank ac
count went to Margaret Aldred and the
third iirize. a bank account was won
by Aileen T'entriss. A .'fl ])rize was
awarded to each of the following;
('haiies JIarsh, Gynthia Vaughn, Henry
Biggs, Evelyn Kives, and Helen Shn-
ford.
This contest was conducted by tbe
Morris Plan Industrial Bank during
the montli of May and was open to
any student in tlie high school. Many
teachers allowed the ads to be banded
in as themes.
IMPROVEMENTS
No more can tlie students of G. H.
S. send up S. O. S. calls through tlie
Open Opinion colmnn concerning nar
row walks, lack of steps, and niaiiy
other things whidi furnished material
for complaints. Tlie Open Opinion
(rolniiin luis been forced out of business
for the present, at least.
With the beginning of school sur
prised students found all kinds, sorts,
shaiies. and sizes of walks, .steps, etc.
We have nothing to complain about, but
better still, we Iiave soinetliing to brag
about, (i. H. S. has so many new trap-
])ings that we can liardly recognize her.
There are the church pews, some
thing at schools. After much consul
tation, it was decided by the faculty
that each pupil should bring his own
cushion as it would probably cause con
fusion for the school to furnish a cer
tain number. It lias been suggested by
the pupils, after much consultation,
that each unfortunate who finils it
necessary to visit the mourner’s bencli
in Miss Mitchell's olfice, bring two
cushions.
Aliss Lottie Morgan, also, has a new
addition to her apartment, a time
keeper ! Now, don’t get excited, it’s a
clock, not a man. AA’e hope she does
not try to keep u.s here all day just to
try it out.
SPECIAL COMMITTEES
APPOINTED BY PHILLIPS
(Tentative)
1. Publications—High Life and Pub
licity, Mrs. Ashford, Mrs. Coltrane,
Alisses Chilton and Harrell; Homespun,
Alisses Tillett, Sumner, Causey, and Mr.
Blair; Re^icctor, Miss AValker and Mr.
Farthing; T/andltook, in connection witli
Student Council.
2. Dramatics, Misses Hollingsworth,
Wheeler, .Tones, Freeman, Mr. J. H.
.Tolmsoii, and Air. Blair.
3. Scholarship, Alisses Grogan, E.
Alitcholl, AIcNairy, and Greenwaldt.
4. Debating Club, Air. Farthing,
Alisses Blackmon, Bridgers, and AIc
Nairy.
~t. Social, Alisses Bullard, Hill, AIc
Nairy. F. S. Alitchell, and Alorrow.
(5. Alusic, Aliss Searcy, .1. H. .Tohn-
son. anl Airs, liobinson.
7. Student ouncil Committee, (tem
porary), Alisses Grogan and Lesley.
5. Chapel, Alisses Hosier, I’otts, Hall,
and Airs. Hogsette.
Library, Alisses (.'aldwell, Behney,
and Hall.
10. Folk D;tncing, Alisses Alorrow
and Potts.
n. Girls’ Athletics, Alisses Dry, Free
man. Aloore, Behney, A’onng, and Airs.
Smith.
12. Boys’ Athletics, Alessrs. Routh,
Coltrane, .1. S. .Tolmson, Woodward, and
Lambeth.
13. Otlice, Alisses East ami Young.
1-1. Thrift. Airs, (.'hristie, Alisses Har
rell, i.esley, Searcy, Sumner, and Aiar-
fin.
l.C). Aluseiim, Alisses Alercer, Jones,
and Greenwaldt.
HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS
SPEND HAPPY VACATION
Enjoy Many Forms of Pleasure, Recrea
tion and Improvement—Return to
School Duties With Zest
FEW TAKE MEDICAL TREATMENT
'I'he teachers of (L H. S. have re
turned to school, having spent the sum
mer in various and sundry ways.
This year li) teachers attended snm-
iner schools. Aliss Alar.v E. Blackmon.
Aliss P>essie B. Behney, Aliss Alary
Hosier, Aliss Rachel Freeman. Aliss
lone Grogan, Aliss Eleanor Hill and
Aliss Fannie S. Alitchell attended Co-
Inmbia. Aliss Alitchell also enjoyed
trips to the monntaiiis and beach. Alis.s
Alary Ilarrel and Aliss Lucile Alercer
was at Duke Fniversity. Aliss Alercer
siieiit some time at lake Jnnaluska.
X. c.
Aliss Alary Wheeler and AIrs\ H. B.
C.’liristie took courses at N’. C’. C. AA'.
Aliss Sarah Lesley and Aliss Amy
Caldwell went to Harvard. Aliss Laura
Tiilett. who toured New England, and
Aliss Lily AA’alker. wiio enjoyed a Ford
liegira. also attended Harvard.
Other teachers at summer school
were: Aliss Julia Seare.v, University
of Georgia ; Aliss Katherine Jones, Uni
versity of A'irginia: Air. Louis IT.
AA'oodward anl Air. J. 11. Johnson.
Alisses Estelle Alitchell taught at
G. H. S. simiiner s-liool. Aliss Alar-
garet Bridgi's coached students.
Aliss Alary Alorrow went “pioneer
ing” in the Smoky Aloimtains.
Aliss Ruth (ireeiiwalt traveled.
Aliss Evelyn Alartiii went ‘‘honieseek-
ing.” Aliss Dorothy AIcNairy “kept
house.”
Aliss Julia Potts was in Salisbury.
Aid., Aliss Lena Bullard in Fayette
ville. N. and Aliss Taila East in
Senatobia. Aliss; Aliss Edith Robinson
ill Richmond. A’a., Aliss Nellie K. Dry
in Concord, X. C., Aliss Alary Broome
in Kinston. X. C.. and Aliss A'irginia
Hollingsworth in Dawson, Ga.
Air. AA’illiam Blair did boys’ work
for the Friends Church. AA'. H. Col
trane was connected ivith the Y. AI.
C'. A, activities and Air. Stanley John
son found work in the held of athletics.
A. P. Routh was in Asheboro, N. C..
and Air. Mark Lambeth in Brown Sum
mit. .1. A. Farthing traveled.
Airs. AA'illiam Smith and Airs. Alma
Coltrane stayed in Greensboro.
MISS BROOME
NEW LIBRARIAN
AT HIGH SCHOOL
Is Pleased With Collection and
Arrangement of Books
Aliss Alary Broome will be in charge
of the High School library this year.
Aliss Broome is a graduate of Greens
boro College, and also of Simmons Col
lege, Boston, from which she received
her degree in Library Science last year.
For the three years preceding last
year, Aliss Broome was connected with
the Aycock School library.
The new librarian says she is very
much pleased with the splendid collec
tion of books which we have in the
High School library and is very enthus
iastic over the prospects for an ex
cellent year’s work. She hopes that
every student in school will find much
pleasure in the use of the library as
wel as assistance in his school work.
GRADUATING CLASS
CHOOSES PRESIDENT
Mary Jane Wharton Elected at
Last Meeting of Sen
iors, May 24
ACTIVE IN SCHOOL LIFE
Alary Jane AA’harton was elected
everlasting president of the graduating
class of June 1027 at a meeting of
the senior class held at chapel period.
Alay 24, 1027.
Alary Jane was a member of the
Torch Light Society and president of
the Girls’ Athletic Association. She
took tlie leading part in several plays
during the year and was a member of
the Dramatics Club. During her
Junior year she icas president of the
Girls' Council. vShe wore a gold star
during all her senior year and Inid the
highest average in her class.
Alary Jane was an active member of
the l)!4)--‘t!ng (.’lub iu 1020 and '27,
was president of the “Girls’ Athletic
Association.”
SEMESTER OPENS WITH
MANY NEW STUDENTS
101 Pupils Come to G. H. S. From
Grammar Schools and 12 From
South Buffalo
At'ith the ushering in of the fall term
of school many new i)upils enter the
high school. Fi'om the grammar
schools lol ])n])ils come to G. H. S. and
12 students from South Bncalo begin
the semester's work. The roll of new
stiKlents from Greensboro schools is as
follows;
Mclver School
Dick .Andrew, Douglas D.-Uton. liig-
don Dees. Clara Garrett. Jewell Goode,
Fi-ances Grantham. Alary llorney,
Helen Landreth, AVinifred Alarsli.
Lewis Perdue. Beverly A. Snstare,
Charles A'estal. Robert AVogord. Alar-
garet AA'hite. Eleanor AA'elboni.
South Buffalo School
Alildred A])ple. Joseph Coble, Bronna
(’(M-hiiuin. Edith Frazier. Rhesa Lee
Johnson. Frances C. AInrcIiison. Alarga-
rct AInrcIiison. Sylvia Irene ,Spooii.
I'velyn Stedman. T-ouis Sutton. Leonard
Sutton. Kn te AVoodbnrn.
Caldwell School
Lila Best Brower. Gordon Bason.
Rena Aiay Collins. Edith Corsbie. Hazel
Fox, Willard Randolph Freeman. Dor
othy AXerle Garrison, Carolyn Hay,
Helen Holbrooks, Bernard Jenkins.
Elizabeth Kelly. Byron Lyon. Helen
Lovin, .Jack lyewis, Doyle AlcKinney.
Louise Park, Helen Pritchett.. Charlie
Pemberton, Owe;? Rothrock. Alargaret
Smith, Herbert Sbelton, AA’illiam El
liott Sullivan, Kathleen AA'renn.
Aycock School
Frank P. Aberiiethy, Alarguerite An-
man, Howard Anderson, Speight Bird,
Frances Bishop, Ellen Bush. Frank
('ox. Evelyn Cornelius. Frances Craw
ford, Frank Causey, Katherine Davis,
Bill.v Edgerton, Cristo Lane Fogle,
(Continued on Page Si.x)
NEW BOOKS IN
LIBRARY
Ratks—Talks on Writing English.
Kezari)—.!/.(/ Class in Composition.
Boui)—Gasoline.
Bury—.1 History of Freedom of
Thought.
Coe—What .\ils Our Youth?
CoEBY — Literature and Life in
School.
Dewey—Reconstruction in Philoso-
phy.
Drur/i—Backhone: The Develop
ment of Character.
Eliot—Training for an Effective
Life.
Fairchild—The Teaching of Poetry
in the High School.
Hamilton—A Manual of the Art of
Fiction.
Harrington — Typical Kewspaper
Stories.
Hawley—Tcachiny English m Jun
ior High Schools.
Irwin—The Next War.
.Jackson—IPiiof I/cn Do.
Lefebure—7'hc Riddle of the Rhine.
AIathews—The Faith of Modernism.
AIcA'nioitt—English Words and
Their Background.
Shipherd—The Fine Art of Writing.
Sinclair—The Brass Check.
V7//.vxxM^Narratlve Technique.
A’anderwalker—Wood Finishing.
The library has a number of other
new books wbicli were purchased
during the snnnner and these will
be ready for circulation in a short
time.
EMMA GRIFFIN ELECTED
PRESIDENT FORSEM. SIX
Other Officers Were: Vice-President,
Bill Latham; Secretary-Treasurer,
Katherine Nowell
Emma Griffin was elected president
of Seme.ster (1 at a meeting held Alay
2b, 11)27. at chajiel period. Other officers
elected were; Bill Latiiam, \ it-e-presi-
denf: Katherine Nowell, secretary and
treasurer.
George AlcSwain, former president,
expressed his thanks for the support
given by the class to him during the
last semester. The new president said
that she hope the coining semester
would be a good one for her class and
that she would give all her support
to it.
During the year 11)20-1027 Emma
was captain of the sophomore basket
ball team and played guard on the
team. She was a reporter on the High
Life staff last year; was a member of
the varsity swiniiniiig team in 2r)-20,
and belonged to the Girls' Council dur
ing 1020.
G. H. S. SUMMiRACHOOL
HELD UNTIL AUGUST 1
Eighty-Five Pupils and Eight Teachers
Compose Session—Only Two Failures
Among Students Taking Courses
The Greensboro High School Sum
mer School was in session from June
13 to July 30. from S :30 to 12:.30,
every morning, including xSaturday.
C. AA’. I’hillips was principal of the
si-hool for three weeks, and Air. Scott
for the remainder of the term.
There were eight teachers and So
juipils with only two failures. The
teachers were : Alisses Estelle Alitchell,
Nell (fiiilfon. Z. Hunter, Nam-y Little,
C. Ferguson. Ada AlcCracken, Messrs.
AVilliam Neal, and Bobby AA’llkins.
BILL BYERS RECEIVES
ANNAPOLIS NOTICE
Bill Byers, new student council pres
ident. j-eceived a notice from Annapolis,
Friday, August 2, saying that he had
been recommended a place by Alajor
Stedman in the United States Naval
Academy. Bill also received papers
and numerous blanks to fill out.
He sa.vs that as long as he can re
member lie has wanted to go to An
napolis, and looks forward with much
pleasure to his years there.
DR. FREEMAN HEARD
AT ODELL MEMORIAL
BY JUNE GRADUATES
C. W. Phillips Awards Medais
and Distinctions—Frederick
Archer Presents Dipiomas
94 RECEIVE DIPLOMAS
Speaking For Wider Horizons Dr.
Freeman Urges Class to Be in
the Spirit of Going On
The commencement exercises of
Greensboro High School were held
June 3, at Odell Alemorial.
Following the invocation by Rev. I.
H. Hughes, Air. E. D. Broadhurst,
chairman of the board of education, in
troduced the siieaker of the evening,
Dr. Douglas S. Freeman. Dr. Free
man is editor of the News Leader, of
Richmond, A'a.
Speaking for wider horizons in the
future Dr. Freeman said, “the tragedy
of life is loss of interest in other things
and the development of interest in only
self.”
He characterized the first cause of
narrow lioridons as mental sloth. He
gave intellectual short-cuts as the sec
ond cause of narrowness, and as his
final cause, faith in the superlative vir-
tiire of specialization.
The way to widen horizons, lie said,
was to be in tlie spirit of going on.
AA'ider horizons would liring not only
physical and mental advantages but
those “in the realm of the mind” would
be of far greater value.
After the address C. AY. riiillips,
principal of the High School, gave the
records of the year and awarded
medals and distinctions.
Following this Frederick Archei’, sup
erintendent of the sch(X)ls, presented
diplomas to the 94 graduates.
vSinging of the i-lass song and bene-
iliction by Rev. II. A. Fesperniaii, pas
tor of the Firs*- Rofoi-Mi .-loaod
the exercises.
LOCAL SCOUTS ATTEND
GRAYSTONE IN JUNE
At Least Seven New Troops Are to Be
Organized Among the Various Schools
and Churches—Scouting Better
Even though most of the troops have
been disbanded during the summer,
scouting has been active in Greensboro.
Alore than two hundred and fifty boys
spent at least two weeks at Gre.vstone,
the camp of the Groenshoro Council of
the Roy Scouts. The sea.son, the
camp's third, was divided into four
periods of two weeks for the scouts
and two periods of one week for the
boys who are too young to be. scouts
but who intend to enter Scouting when
they reach the age of twelve. The
program included nature study, water
sports, athletics, handicraft and other
subjects of a scouting nature.
Air. J. AA'. Geeslin, the Scout Execu--
tive, has a number of plans for the
promotion of scouting in Greensboro.
He intends to organize at least .seven
new troops among the various churches
and schools.
Of interest to scouts in G. 11. S. is
Air. Geeslin’s jilan to enable them to
pass merit badges while in school. He
and Scout Commissioner Benbow have
arranged to have different business
nuMi of the city who have qualified as
merit badge examiners, to visit the
school during study jieriods and pass
the boys on their tests.
The Executive says he has every
reason to believe that scouting, this fall
and winter, will be even better and more
successful than the last.
RILEY SCOTT RECITES
NATURE POEMS HERE
At chapel period Thursday, Alay 13.
Riley Scott recited several of his poems
to the girls and boys of G. H. S.
Air. Scott’s poetry is mostly about
nature. He travels in Keutuck.y, Ten
nessee, and North Carolina, studying
nature and visiting camps for boys.
    

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