North Carolina Newspapers

    •RAINEY OUSTER THREATENED
*! MAN BITES
| POLICE
jt>HU.Aiit.LPHIA lANP)
A Saturday night family tight
between tv»o brothers ended in
a free tior ail with two poiice
mtn Joining in and one suffer
ing bites on the right hand.
/ Brothers Alfred amt Marry
Alston ate said vo have been
having it out so loudly that
neighbors called the wagon
When police came to quell the
fracas, the brothers, once di
vided, now joined forces
agains. the cops, Fists fiev> and
sticks bounced tn ana oft heads
until the eider Alston was drag
ged from the house to the
wagon.
its Alston was being lugged
to the wagon, he struck out
with hi; beet aa>d sen. Patrol
man John Holden to the pave
ment. it was here that the of
ficer said Alston jumped on
him and bit him in me right
hand.
At .he nos pita), the officer's
hand required three stitches.
At the hearing, Alston was beia
without bait charged with
mayhem.
RANBOIMTO
CONTINUE ‘CIVIL
DISOBEDIENCE'
WASHINGTON (ANP) ln a
letter issued Finlay to’loaders of
the major political parties, A
Philip Randolph is quoted as
savins he is still hoping that con
gress or the President will ye!
outlaw racial segregation in the
a; my.
The letter, addressed to Presi
dent Truman, Thomas h. Dew
ey, Carroll Reece, J. Howard Mc-
Grath and others, stated that "the
abolition of segregation in the
armed forces is the only solu
tion acceptable to a vast majori
ty of Negroes and liberal Ameri
cans.’"
Mr. Randolph made it cleat
That he has no desire to advocate
siifh a drastic treasure tor ita
own sake but that “under the
circumstances' he has "no alter
native but to counsel civil dis
obedience'’
Randolph is quoted as desiring
"all leaders in the nation to know
tnst. the League lor Non-Violent
Caul Disobedience Against Miii
tary segregation -considers tin’
executive order establishing the
President's Committee on Equal
ity ot Tratrne-m and Opportunity
in the Armed services as most
inadequate.”
The national coordinating com
mittee of the league, which met
in Chicago last, week went on
record to denounce the Presi
dent’s executive order as totally
inadequate and voted “to con
tinue the civil disobedience cam
paign until sgregation in the
armed forces is abolished either
by congressional action or exeeu
tive order even though thousands
may face intimidation or impri
sonment.”
postal" aluance
HOLDS INSTITUTE
Thirty-three members of the
National Alliance of Postal Em
ployees from nine states and in
eluding three national officers,
three district presidents, and Mrs
Alberta J. Braxton, National Vice
President of the Ladies Auxiliary,
were in attendance on July 30
31. ana August Ist at a week-end
institute on worker education
held at Ohio State University.
The Alliance’s .Education Com
mit tee in co-operation with the
(Continued on page 8. Ist Section •
OKLA. COURT DENIES
3 PERMISSION TO
ENTER UNIVERSITY j
Oklahoma City (AMP) —Three
women, Mosdarnex Ada Fisher of
Chicasha, Mauderi* Hancock Wil
ma and Helen Maxine Holoiro,
both of Oklahoma City, were de
■nod court orders compelling the
University of Oklahoma to admit
them for graduate study, here
last week. The refusal to rule in
their favor was made by District
Judge T. JttsLin Hinshaw.
in the Fisher case, the jurist
held that a separate but equal law
' school had been established .by
the state, offering Hw courses, in
compliance with the U. S. Su
preme court verdict. He did not
say anything about the adequacy
~ of the. school.
As fer the other two women,
their pleas were denied on the
contention that they had given
uoiiee of their desire to pursue
graduate studies In social work
and commercial education only
three days before the opening of
the university’s winter season last
January.
Hinshaw did not make it dear
whether the- ruling was based on
_★★★★★★★ ★★*★★★ ** ★ & '★ ★ ★ ★ ★ * •k W W W :
30.000 VOTE IN S. C.
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- f ""' 1 'at, • * • '’ ■ - ■
THE CAROLINIAN
lB'rv::-v;V,T:^Liiw.Aw;: ; y,“ ---w-T--A/■■ -■■■■■- •- -----——
16 Pages
VOLI ME XXVIII
POLIO CASE REPORTED HERE
-jfc- ★ ★ ★ ★ T*r ★ ★★★★★★★ ★ '★★★★★ ★ if ★
TELLER 1N52,977 SHORTAGE
. POLIO DOWNS 8-
VEAR OLD BOY IN
CHAVIS HEIGHTS
'North Carolina’s polio toll
- climbed to the unprecedented to
~ • ltd ot l,3kf this we«A. with one
i cgse reportc-i in the city's Chavis
. Heights Housing project.
'1 he stricken youngster, who
. was admitted to St. A.;nes Hospi
tai last week, was identified by
s County Health Officer Dr A. C
i Buiia as eight year old Louis Ha
; vi*, ?• , the .m, , i XL. a:i.. .r«
i Louis Davis of 3 Asha Ter; at e,
Chavis Heights.
This case two others which
were admitted to the Hex H- s-'
> pita! during the week boo-fed
the county’s total for the y.--:,r 28
t At St Agnes the Davis child’s
condition was reported on Wei
nes.lay morning a-, “tair".
- Alate an 1 local health ofticiai
Stated Htji if, CP.s llgM ot Uie . *3i ■
,- tinued high in-idc-nee of the dir.
t eaSe PXiStilig pdio ’ »-\t!' ICt > jUS
would be continued m eifect.
In the meantime a dreary-' pos
t si-bilitv was offered bv Dr. Hav!
i Van Ripe;, medical director for
- i Continued on page. 8. Ist Section?
; ON UNIT BLASTS
MARRIAGE BAN
GENEVA (ANPi The commit
tee on human rights of the UN
f■■ ..iiomic and s-,0,, ai cour.cd , ■-r-d
ia-ft in xa\ or ot « Caiiackan resoiii
; lion condemning all legal measures
■ against mixed marriages, ii was
learned here Thursday. Six tiiem
i :be is of the comrmtee abstained.
The Canadian proposal was a
' compromise between conflicting re
; olntions advanced by Chile and ike
iSov.et Union. Since the committee
j Las the same membership as the
[council, it is considered ccrtant
That the council will also back the
i j Canadian revolution which says the
I j council deplored "all legislative
j measures to prevent mixed mar
l riages between persons of differ
? jent color, nationality, race or re
• ; Jigion “
? the fact that the applicants had j
t not given sufficient advance no- j
* bee to enable tW state u set. up i
. the graduate course for Negroes !
t a«f they desired.
* : According to Ally, Antes T. j
t jHail of Tulsa, the -cases are to be )
* i appealed to the state and U. S. !
5 ; supreme courts. Mrs. Fisher's j
> cast has already been before the j
<vo courts twice. Hall also said
' he would launch another ■vitack j
•’ !tn the state’s segregation sta
< | lues in the U. S. district court
* I He will seek to compel admission
- equal facilities feu the two races
t | of Negroes to white schools when
■ r i cannot be provided.
Meanwhile, the state govern !
. ; ment began work on a bill for the •
6 | next 1 egislature which would
t i alter Oklahoma’s 40 - year -old
“ ' segregation laws. This measure is
{ designed to open up white schools
* jtc Negroes when the state urn
s : versify at Langston does not of
t : for similar and ectu&l work. The
: atl-white university at Norman
1 bus 70 graduate courses which;
i '■ Msngston doss hot offer. *
NOR TH CAROL IN A ’.S' LEADING WEEKL Y
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA WEEK ENDING SAT! ED AY, AI'GC ST 11. 10-18
W
\
t ifiqk y. -— y'.
UR MINI)! 1> VISITORS
Above are .mown Willutn and
time- Rainr.*., <4 Sew York Oij
who flew to Raleigh Monday to
visit their parent* Mr. anti Mrs.
E Rainer of 5?8 East i.enoit
Street.
tV.hiam .with earphones) u.
the owner and pilot ~f the plane
iturfag me war he v as a flight
instructor in < ii.cagn and then at
Tuskegee. He is now a practicing
attorney in Sew York t H\ with
otiii-r at t*l4*t geventh Avenue.
Janies set i etl during the war
with the Sea tees and now oper
ates an electU-al business in New
York till
Carolinian Photo by Shephard
Ready Plans For Negro
Business imposition
CHICAGO s'ANP) Heralding
a new era of progress for Negro
business, tire Chicago Neg; o
. Cfcapaber of Uommeroe announ
ced here last week that it is ra
pidly comp;eting plans lot the
‘ forth.r iming Expofitioa on Ne
; gro business to be held at Giles
Avenue armory, Sept. 4-6 A pro
exposition conference with Negro
businessmen throughout the mid
; die western state* is scheduled
jfoi Sept. 1-3 in the Ida B Wells
j-i.Ontitit.ua on pay.. S Ist Section)
RACF PROBLEM IS
Sill) TO BE SCUTE
M SOUTH AFRICA
! I.OUISVTLLF < ANP; Better
J polict- projection, bettet vocational
■ gtiid,-u-. fi and more opportunity for
Negro physicians were borne of tiv
improvements askvj for bj an in
terracial group aftei completing a
siA./ev of Negro problems in Louis
; iHc lasi week
J The interracial committee, of 50.
i headed b\ Po-'tmastev Joseph D
Scholtr, reviewed' a ’’7s page .re
port of the study completed ;o
April, The repot > will be publish
ed in September.
J. Harvey Kerne, assistant di
rector of the departm-snt of re
search and •community projects of
the National Urban league com
i pleted the report, and the in terra •
i (Continued on vagi 8, Ist Seuticc)
Robeson And Wife
| Named Communists
NEW YORK (ANP) Paul
Robeson. c<> chairman or the
Progressive patty aiut hi-, wife,
Mi-. F-landa iioode Robeson
an anthropologist in infield,
< timt., vs tio is running for sec
retary of .rale on the i'fofn-s
--ttve party’s six e in that state,
were termed member-, oi the
('uiftiuunifct part's in an article
written by Frederick Wellman
*>i the World Telegram on
August
A Who's Who of Henry Wai-
WA s I‘rogre- -.re party ccwi
vintion unclosed today .hat
?'♦ of ihe key figures who
founded the new party vvtre
' x " '
«***•*»-'
CAMPAIGNER —-Vat Wash
ington (lefts confers with Her
bert Brownell, Jfr. Campaign
Manager far Dewey - Warren
open or secret members of the
< oiitmunity party,” the • ruy
begun
Continuing, the story said
that "the survey was marie pub
in- tn Counter-attack, ami
<Mmmunist newsletter publish
ed by former I BI agents.’
At ei stating "among other
leaders listed as Communists
were Paul Robeson, Airs. Robe
son." etc. The story said, Mrs.
marietta Bass, co-chairman of
Women For Wallace, has sup
ported Communist candidates
tor office anti backed no less
than eight organizations on the
government's subversive list.”
I Ticket daring a mcHmic in Wash
ington iti vitiich Mr- Washing
! tffia accepted an appointment as
1 Assistant C&mpaijre Ma®ag-«r.
SINGLE .
COPY IOC
NUMBER 6
GIRL HOilS USE
OF FUNDS FROM
BANK ACCOUNTS
The- need tor money and the
handling of large sums of it
proved too strong a combination
tor Miss Leo la Lee, an employee
of thi Raleigh Branch of the Me
chanics and Farmers’ Bank who
was reported last week as being
$2,99? short in her accounts.
According to the bank official;,
Miss Lee who has been employed
by the bank for nearly two years
. and was in charge of Christmas ;
savings accounts, admitted re- !
sponsibility for the shortage
The loss, which was covered
by the employee’s bond, was im
mediately reported to State
Banking Commissioner Gurney
Hood who in turn reported it to
John Hall Harming, federal dis
trict attorney and to an agent
of the Federal Bureau of Inver
tigatiOii wrnch is making an ia
-■ est igatioii.
Miss Lee, who could not Vie
reached sot comment, was ques- .
Coned Tuesday by agents of the ;
FBI whom she was reported to j
have '.old that she had appropri- j
• a ted the money for her own use [
over j period of several months, j
J. H. Wheeler, vice president in
charge of the Durham Branca, |
and J. E. Strickland vice press- j
dent in charge of the Raleigh
Branch stated that the loss was j
the i;rst in the history of the.
B. :k since it was organized 40 I
years ago.
This was borne out by Com
missioner Hood who described i
the nank as one of the soundest I
in the state and said that he had j
not heard of any other shortage :
since coming to Raleigh 17 years i
ag"-
C C. Spaulding, president of |
: < Continued on page 8, Ist Section' j
Baptists Fo Raise J'
Million For Seminary
LYNCHBURG, v a . iANPi —!
. Baptist leaders ot Virginia backed,
•by Baptist lenders in several other I
'states and the District of Columbia |
approved a plan here August 3 to j
rais. $1,003,000 for Virginia Thco-j
i logical Seminary and college over;
! a five-year period.
One hundred Baptists of Virginia I
and leaders of the denomination
i from other states were .-•lied herei
bv Dr M Allen, president of]
Virginia Theological Seminary and j
.-ollege. who delivered the main !
add res- to the leaders who gather-'
(Continued on page 8, Ist Section l j
OKLAHOMA SUIT j
SCHEDULED FOR !;
STATE COURT !
NORMAN, OkTa Denied ad- c
mission to the University of Okla- v
homa by a decision of District c
Judge T. Justin Hinshaw, Mrs. Ada t
[Siputl Fisher, Mis: Helen Maxine I
Holmes and Mrs. Mauderie Han- f
rock-Wilson prepared to carry their i
ease to the State Supreme Court, C
Amos T. Hall of Tulsa, who togeth- j 1
- r with Thurgood Marshall, N A s
A. C P. special counsel, represent- s
ed tiie young women, announced !r
today. ; f
For more than two years Mrs. jfc
; Fisher has sought admission to the i/
' university lav. school, The United;
j State;; Supreme Court last January i
I ordered, the State of Oklahoma to t
i (Continued on €» Ist Section; jP
ELECTION ODIET,!
NEGROES CAST !
PRIMARY VOTE i
| ;
COLUMBIA, S. C. For the j
; first time since the days of Re- j
; const: action, Negroes went to the
i polls Tuesday and cast approxi- !
: matcly 3U.OUU ballots in a Demo- '<
1 era tic primary in the Slate of j
| South Carolina.
The voting, made possible by
rulings handed down by Federal .
Judge J. Waites Waring, a na
j live South Carolinian, was car- j
j ried out without incident despite j
j the fact that the State’s Cover - j
nor, J. Strom Thurmond, is the J
| Dixiecrat candidate for President
■ and one of the most staunch foes I
j of President Truman’s civil rights j
program.
The rulings, the first of which !
! was handed down by Judge War
! mg more than a veai ago, disal-
I lowed the party’s contention that \
| it was a social club and therefore j
| entitled to restrict its membei-j
ship to members of the Caucasian j
i race.
Only Impartant Election !
This first ruling maintained k
that the Democratic primary was : !
the only real and important elec- !'
lion held in the state and was ;
therefore an integral part of the 1
State’s election machinery anc! ’
consequently open to qualified '
»lectors regardless of race.
The party then complied with !
the better of the law and permit- ; 1
ted the casting of votes by the
(Continued on page 8. Ist Section? 1
CITY TO DONDOGT i
RACE RELATIONS
SCHOOL FOR COPS:
LOUIS Vi LLE (ANP) five <
irst course in race relations giv- ‘
on by a southern city to its rookie
policemen will be started about j
Sopt. 20, according io an an- }
nouncement made here last week j
bv Safety Director Davis A. Me- *
Landless. The course will consist .
c< a series of lectures presented 1
during the next eight week train- ’
ing school for police. ‘
The decision to have the course 1
Continued on page 7. Ist Section *
$20,000 Offered For |
New Palace Designs
NEW YORK (AMP) lt was : f
announced here by John A. Shaw, c
Ethiopian 'counsel general in New s
York, l.bat hu native country was 1 1
offering prizes totalling $20,000 10 1
,he architects and engineers de- j j
■ igr.ing winning entries for the new \
emperot’s palace in Addis Ababa, i
First prize to the winning design 11
will be $10,000; second prize, $6,000 j
and third prize, $4,000 j t
Those wishing to enter the con- j i
test may get regulations by writing; ;
to Shaw at 78 Water Street, New j s
York. All entries must be submit- 1 c
ted to his office by Dectember 10. ;
Judges will be announced later ;i
FIRST jl
T'fis new palace wi]l be the first (
COLUMBUS, OHIO IS
HOST TO LOTT CAREY
MISSION CONVENTION
The Fifty-first Annual Session of t
’he Lott Carey Baptist Foreign Mis- 1
sion Convention, USA will be held ; %
at the Trinity Baptist Church, Co- j p
lumbus, Ohio August 31-Scptetrr jii
ber 3, according to Rev Wendell ] J
C. Somerville, executve secretary j s
More than twelve hundred offi- i
eial delegates from nineteen states jii
will be present at Columbus. Ac- V
cording to the Rev. Mr Somerville, 1 C
the Lott Carey Baptist Foreigr !1<
Mission Convention has 9,j R
foreign missionaries currently serv- ; F
mg in Bermuda, Belgian Congo,; b
China, Haiti, India, Portuguese Is-. N
land and West Afirca. ;3V
The executive secretary further R
states that the convention is cur- g
rently erecting a one hundred and V
fifty thousand ($150,000) dollar j
building program in Liberia, Wes'! ft
Africa. Iv
SPEAKERS ! v
Among the outstanding speakers jcl
to address the Convention are: Miss;
Paomal Das, Indian educator, Ai- ((
Prisoners
Pull Plows
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (ANF)
Negro prisoners have been
l used in the place o l mules to
I puli plows in the fields. State
! Prison Director Frank Boswell
admitted here task week. 15c
was testifying before prison
investigators making a study of
conditions in state penal insti
' tutious.
According to Boswell, the
| convicts "voituVarily" fonmstl
] teams of four, six or eight to
plow the fields-
According to his explanation,
at Kilby prison farm the ground
j vs as too »of. for the mules to
work there. The prisoners de
cided •'that it was better to puli
the plows themselves rather
than hoe the area. So, be added,
they formed their plow teams
and went to work.
Men hni dragged plows at
Atmore prison farm before his
regime, Boswell said. He told of
this 'workhorse” group to a
legislative - public, committee
which will eventually work out
a reform program for state pri
sons.
PA. MAGISTRATE
DEFIES WARNING
TO QUIT RACE
j PHILADELPHIA - Faced with
! the threat of criminal impeach
ment unless he resigns from the
| bench or withdraw.*, as the Pro
gressive Party candidate for Can
cic-s from the Fourth Pennsyi
i vania District, Magistrate Josepn
H. Rainey this week branded the
threat as an attempt to halt the
progress of the Third Party in the
Quaker City.
The Philadelphia jurist an : for
mer New Deal Demo
leader was warned r
Deputy Attorney Gene;
H. Eldredge- that his e
dated the Magistrates’
j passed by the Pa. Sian . . s.a
;lure in 1537.
A3fha« ■' .Jndge ’am: .-.as
Warn;-.d m 3 letter from Elareaga
mere than a weelt ago, no such
warning has been .received by Mag
istrate Hobson H. Reynolds, who
is candidate for the State Senate
on the Republican ticket for the
S venth District.
Commenting upon the letter to
Rainey. Eldredgv said that he had
intended the letter to be a "friend
ly warning'’ and that he had also
“in 1 ended’’ writing one to Magis
trate Reynolds since he interprets
the Magistrates Court Act as being
designed to keep the judges out of
politics.
iContinued on page 8, Ist Section)
government-owned ruler’s resi
dence in Ethiopian history Any
style of architecture may be used
in thr- designs,
Shaw warned, however, of article
14 of the regulations of the Public
Works department of Ethiopia, say
ing that "the palace ensemble shall
be of a sober and majestic style.”
It must be noted by architects
that “the Ethiopian dynasty draws
its origins from King Solomon and
the Queen of Sheba.” facts that
should be considered in making the
designs
In the past, Ethiopian rulers have
used their private estates as their
homes.
(Continued on page K, Ist Section)
torney Eva Parker Crosby, prom
inent Oberlin Ohio, Atorney, Dr.
Vernon Johns, brilliant scholar and
philosopher; the Rev. C. B. W. Gor
inent. Oberlin, Ohio, Attorney', Dt.
J. Vance Mclver, Orange, New Jer
sey
Other prominent speakers will
include Dr. J. M. Ellison, President
Virginia Union University, Dr. M.
C, Allen, president, Virginia Theo
logical Seminary and College; the
R*v. C. M. Long, Jr., McKeesport,
Pennsylvania, the Rev. H. T. Myers,
Norfolk; the Rev, J K. Burkes,
Newark, N. J., The Rev. Corscy O
Mitchell, Berkley W. Virginia, the
Rev E. E. Smith. Richmond, Vir
ginia, and the Rev, R. M. Pitts,
Winston-Salem. N. C.
Professor V* E. Pat< 'Tv.
folk, Virginia will dry*. •
mention Chorus, con ,; '. - mi:
voices, made up ot u n>u
sfaoirs of Columbus
One <*f the 1 ighliptua ■ 1 <*n
(Continued on pajge tt, Ist Peruaa!
    

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