North Carolina Newspapers

    Holden Is Reinstated
By Post Office Dept.
Now Works
In Md. As
Mail Carrier
In a surprise move last week, Ed
ward B. Holden, of 616 Hadley
Road, was reinstated to his position
as letter carrier in the Post Office
Department.
Raleigh Postmaster D. Staton
Inscoe advised Holden that the
Board of Appeals and Review
had sustained his appeal con
cerning his resignation from his
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 2)
Thompson’s Principal
Mother’s Day Orator
Mrs Minetta G. Eaton, principal
of the Thompson School, will give
the Mother’s Day address at the
St. Matthew AME Church. 804 East
Davie Street, Sunday, May 10, at
the 11 am. service.
Mrs. Eaton is an honor graduate
of Morgan State College, Baltimore,
Md., where she earned the Bache
lor of Arts degree in Social Studies,
and received the Master of Arts de
gree from New York University.
She has done further study at Chi
cago and New York Universities in
supervision and administration.
She has had much experience
working with women and is affil
iated with several national organi
zations. Among these are: National
Council of Negro Women, Jack and
Jill of America, and the Association
of University Women.
Mrs. Eaton is the wife of J. W.
Eaton, principal of Washington Jr.
(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11
14 Ligon High Students
“Take Over” City Hall
Seize Two
In *ltccfcr*
Crackdown
Two Rraleigh men were arrested
hci-e last weekend by city. State
and Federal officers and charged
with producing and selling mari
juana. better known as "reefers''.
A Shaw University student, Wil
lie Walker, was charged last week
with similar charges. However, he
has been released on bond and is
now allegedly still on the campus
of the Baptist institution. He is a
native New Yorker and was being
supplied by his uncle, a 19-ycar-old
youth, who lives with Walker's
(CONTINUED ON PAGE 2)
i muLiHaaf 11 'Mi
W E AT H E R
-
Temperatures next five days,
Thursday through Monday will
average a few degrees above norm
al In the Western sections of th#
Carolines and near norma) else
where. Continued warm weather
through Friday. Turning a little
rooler over the weekend. Showers
llkelv about Triday and Saturday,
will be light and average generally
below one tenth of an Inch.
CAROLINIAN
ADVERTISERS
BIA FROM THEM
PAGE *
Huron » Cash
«or M’irnlcV'» Promotion'
I inro'n l.iratr*
Nmbas&ado* Theatra
I-AGF J
T rsen«
p.ne Mat* Creamery
P.V t 3
H H'-Mjn-Belk—Efird* *»f RalfUh
lohn '%» ?V infer* A Co.
O nn % r.sso a»er\te<
t > n»r Realty Co.
A im?i Sanders Til * Co
i ari’al Caca-Cola Battling Co
F "rif' Meat Market
j n ?rilia
r g. *
( .>• nial Stores
T r. C»ii»nn Fim.tur* Co.
f Karl Ut<hman
~ - n nanf Shop
A m' L timfrv A Cleaner* !m
L.*n<.»D Oil Co.
» <,«>♦• Builders Co
r\< r *
r-tf* -( »y
TACT *
C onsoiir'ated Credit Corp
Record Shop
ood i s i ]«r Store
Dru( Co.
f nar:aln Store
Ra’eirh Co.
f,- s Rnsio* Hatter* A
- T-“ We**’! Florist
C 'mmunity Drug
Daniel*
I C. Penne*a
Hellif-Levtne
Tint’s Studio
Shoe Mart
Mother A Daughter
Raleigh CommKrion Hou r
Jov'* American G"1I1
Green Cleaner*
B: ffalo* Co. A Builder*
PAGE 14
Deadline For Registration Ms 3iag 8. Get Four
EDWARD B. HOLDEN
jtm
M
MRS. MINETTA G. EATON
... Mother’s Day orator
Fourteen students from the J. W.
Ligon High School along.with Need
ham Rrougbton. Failoe and Cardi
nal Gibbons high school students
took over Raleigh City Govern
ment. temporarily, Friday as a part
of the annual Kiwanis Club-spon
sored Student Government Day
Tli is is the largest number from
Ligon ever to participate.
All positions in the city govern
ment were filled by students from
the schools, from the mayor to the
sanitary inspector.
The purpose of the event is to
better acquaint students with the
operations of their municipality.
During the morning, student
councilmen and department heads
worked with their professional
counterparts observing the "busi
ness as usual'' routine and hearing
some specific explanations and in
struct ions. .
Students from Ligon partici
pating were: William Peacock
and Helen Morrison as mem
bers of the city council: Doro
thy Shaw, city clerk and treas
urer: Carolyn Cartff, public
works director; Walter Ellis,
cemetery superintendent; Earl
Quiller. building Inspector;
Lawrence Reid, chief operator
of water plant; James Reid, city
court judge; Dlsnn White, clerk
of city court; Patrick Bryant,
street superintendent; Robert
Banders, planning director; Reg
inald Smith, personnel officer.
Steven* Golf Nrrk>
Kalelgh Seafood MarVof
lltv'i Drive-In Onwri
Lightner'* Funeral Hom»
Flre*teue Stores
PAGE 11
Al Smith Bulrk
Wearer Bro* Rambler
Raw I* Motor Co.
PAGE 12
Colonial Store*
Merhanir* a Parmer* Bank
Hotel Andrew Johnson
Abram's I'nted Rent-AD
Klni Cole Motel
PAGE U
Preble*' Charcoal Plan** Restaurant
PAGE 14
Gtanldes Raleigh. Inc.
Broaden Produce Co.
Poole’* Pie Co.
O. D. Sauls Barbecue
L'nlted Restaurant * Equip,," ■! « o.
security Meat Market
Jeffrey'* Seafood Market
Montgomery-Green Co.
PAGE I*
Murray'* Rarbecue
Pierre Music Co. of Raleigh
C rom Poultry
National Meat Market
Watson's Seafood A Poultry Co . fur
TAGS I*
r a Irish Funeral Sons
McLaurtu Parkins Company
Medlta-Davt«
Hudson-Bclk—Eftrd • of Ealetfh
Ambnrn Pontiac. Inc
Branch Banking A Tmat Co.
SSL An to Service
Raleigh Savings A Loan Aaooelation
PAGE IS
Supreme Brake A Alignment Service
PAGE M
Carolina Power A light Co.
Mechanics A Farmers Bank
Bunt General Tire Co
Correll Coal Co
Taylor Radio A Electrical Co.
LocalYW‘
Members At
Ohio Meet
Members of the East Raleigh
Branch Young Women’s Christian
Association, upon their return home
last week, reported to the local
membership on their participation
in another historic Association con
vention in Cleveland, Ohio.
In the city, where in 1910 the
YWCA adapted a statement in
which the organization assumed re
sponsibility to help correct social
injustices, the 33rd national con
vention took major steps in relation
to both the YWCA’s membership
policy and to its commitment to
further racial integration.
In the action on membership, the
convention voted, according to Mrs.
Lillian Freeman, secretary of Com
mittee on Administration and Mrs.
J. A. Boyer, branch director, the
YWCA opened voting righto to all
dues-paying members over 17 years
of age. Previously, they pointed out
voting members had to assent to
the YWCA’s Christian Purpose. The
new policy does require, however,
that all leaders must accept indi
vidual responsibility for furthering
the Christian purpose of the YWCA
in the life of the Association. Lead
ers include members of the board of
directors, professional staff, stand
ing committee and the voting dels*
j gates to the national convention.
In another action, the convention
also took cognizance of the Asso
ciation's concern for further study
on its role and responsibility as a
Christian movement by voting es
tablishment of a national commis
sion to work closely with local As
sociations. The commission will ex
plore what is involved in being a
movement that is both Christian
and open to all women and girls in
communities with wide-spread re
ligious pluralism and many persons
of no religious faith.
The convention also adopted a
mong program priorities for the
next triennim a “deepened recog
nition of the YWCA's responsibil
ity for providing for its members
opportunities to increase their
knowledge of the Christian faith
as a basis for discerning life's
ijpeaning. for making responsible
: personal decisions and for engaging
in civic responsibility and social ac
tion.'’
! ' (CONTINUED ON PAOB t)
UNCCites
J. Cofield,
t
Raleighite
The Air Force Reserve Officer#
! Training Corps at the University
of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, be
stowed a coveted honor upon Cadet
A-2C James E. Cofield, Jr., Sun
day when he was cited on Parents'
Day for winning an honor unit •-
v. aid.
Young Cofield, son of Mr. and
| Mrs. James E. Cofield. Sr.. 232?
Wade Avenue, was the only Negro
cited out of more than thirty s
-1 wards given.
A 1363 honor graduate of too
'„ J W. Llgon High School. Ra
leigh. James and hit Identical
twin brother, Juan, entered the
university In September es last
year. James Is s politic*! science
major sad hopes to huoma aa
attorney, while Jaaa la pw.’aa
lag a pro-medical course, hop
lag to become a physietaa. Ho.
too. was aa haaer stud eat at
Ligea.
The program, held in Memorial
A'tdiiciium on the campus of the
* g* m
I. ‘ 1 1
I
JAMES a COnELO, A
historic univuraity at 1 pm, was
attended tap the Coflald twins’ pur-
Plltt.
Following is tbs oontenta e t the
citation bo James Cefield, Jr.:
-Bauarvu Offlecn AmagtaHan
as Me Unites Statue. Dept, of
North CareHaa. Hunt Unit
Award. Cadet A-tC Jamea E.
CefleM. Untvurstty as Barth
CareHaa, Is awarded Mi Car
ttfheta ad tihimaml. as a
UaM ad tWa achset far He qua!
Canrteny. gebetarabtp and Fan
fCOBTUTCED GW PAGE 21
N. C. Field Organizer Declares
‘HALIFAX OFFICIALS
LIKE MISSISSIPPI’S’
KILLER GETS SHORT TERM HERE
THE CAROLINIAN
VOL. 27, NO. 77
‘Don’t Stop Fight, 9
Mrs. Evers Urges
Freedom
Rally Is
Success
BY &Br HARIIEN *
Jome two thousand NAACP
workers and frineds, comini from
at far wett at Asheville and from
the east to Pantego and Wilming
ton area, braved threatening weath
er to travel the 250 miles each way
to tee and hear Mrs. Myrlie Evers,
the courageous widow of Medgar
Evert, Mississippi NAACP leader
who was ruthlessly slain last year
because of his dynamic civil rights
leadership ability.
Tarheelis was net disappoint
ed for Mrs. Evers made glad
the hearts of the 48 "Mothers’
(special guests of the light for
Freedom program) who had
raised several thousands of dol
lars for the NAACP In their
home communities.
The next highlight of the pro
gram presided over by N C NAA
CP prexy, Kelly M. Alexander, was
the presentation by the combined
Prince Hall Masonic Lodges of Tar
heelia-more than a hundred of
whom came to the platform—of a
donation of three thousand <53.000)
dollars (This marked the second
year Prince Hall has given $3,000i.
Alexander recognised the Eastern
Star, and announced that their con
tribution would coma In later.
The "Mother of the Year" from
tha larger cities or branches was
Mrs. Roberta Judge of Greensboro
who reported $771. the second
time in three years, Tarboro.—un
der the leadership of school-teacher
Mrs. Beatrice G. Burnett,—won the
honor for small towns with Mrs.
Lillian Ricks turning in $505.
la her gaiet and aaemational
asaaaaga ta She audience Mrs.
•vara, a charming and graceful
lady, fall as dignity, ability and
(CONTINUKD ON PAOB t)
From Raleigh’s Police Files:
THE CRIME BEAT
BY CHARLES R JONES
EDITOR* NOTP Each tad
drat described below waa ob
tained from the records and
film ad the Baleigh Police De
partment through a day-to-day
cheek aad each earn la autben
tte. Me ptrisnsl opinion* are
ever expressed In this column.
Baca wad of the rant number as
ummea abtained each week. It
la Impuooihie ta interrlew every
CROOK RTEALB FIFTY CENTS
Mias Mary Ferrell. 1812 Poole
Road, told the cops, at 9:29 pm
Sunday, she had been visiting a
friends a short distance from her
home and when she returned, the
discovered someone had entered the
house by a rear window in her
room. Bothing wad found muting,
except fifty cent*, taken from a
wallet in her dresser draw.
Exit was made through a tide
dooc A neighbor stated *he
two men come to the front door of
North Carolina *s Leading Weekly
RALEIGH, N. C„ SATURDAY. MAY 9. 1964
Hr
A I *4l A, §HBSHhu§|
HP® 1 -
v
\ a l^nm
s .... .*!!?~#
MRS. MYRLIE EVERS is shown addressing a Freedom Dtty
rally, held last Sunday at the Raleigh Memorial Auditorium. (See
story).
Mrs. Daisy Bates Here;
Feted By Voter’s Body
The Raleigh Women Voter's
Council sponsored a dinner meet
ing, Tuesday May Bth, at the Cellar
on East Hargett Street. The pur
pose of the meeting was to present
the World Renown Civil Liberties
Fighter, Mrs. Daisy Bates, of Little
Rock. Akansaa, to the women of
Raleigh.
Mr*. Rates cams to Raleigh under
the auspices of the Raleigh Citl- j
zens Amociatlon. to climax the In- j
tensive vdter registration drive
the Farrell home, but couldn't de
scribe them.
SAMPSON BATTLE BEATS
WOMAN WITH PAN
Officers C. B White and W. A.
j Thomas received a call to go to
■ 738 Quarry Street at 10 pm. Mon
day
i I'pon arrival, they talked to
Mrs. Land Is Dunn. M. who told
them Sampuen Battle. 48. bit
her en the head with a heavy
frying pen. There was Meed en
her eletheu and a eat en the
beck es her head.
The report continued. "We asked
Sampson Battle if he hit her and
he admitted it. "He was then arreht
' ed. charged with aasault with •
| deadly weapon and jailed under
$l5O bond.
j Mrs. Dunn refused to be treated
for her head wound.
(CONTINUED ON PAGE J)
conducted here ter toe pest five
months. James A. Shepard serves
as coordinator for this project. Mrs
Bates stressed the need for more
(CONTINUED ON PAOB 2)
L - THB m ‘ W m
m} Km
■ff 5 ..*
m- If ■ B 1 .!#
VOTERS COUNCIL HONORS MRS. BATES The Raleigh Womens Voters Council
honored Mrs. Daisy Bates, noted wtegrationist ol Little Rock, Arkansas here Tuesday afternoon
at a dinner meeting, held at The Cellar. Shown here, left to right, are Mine Maye E. Ligon, vice
-1 i hairman of the Council; Mrs. Virginia K. Newell, who introduced the speaker; Mrs. Bates, who
addressed the Council; Mrs. Janet M Marchena. chairman of the Council; and Mrs. Bertha M.
Edwards, executive secretary. Not shown is Mis Harveleigh R. White, who was on the commrtee
| in charge ol arrangements. (See story).
Name On The Rooks Now!
PRICE 150
Discuss
Victim’s
Record
Accepting a leaser plea of man
slaughter in the Frhino./ II pistol
death es a Holly Springs woman.
Judge Hal Hammer Walker sen
tenced James Jeffrey Davis, of
Wake Foraet, Route 2 to a period
of not late than one nor more than
five yeara In prison.
Davis pleaded guilty to man
slaughter last week in th# death of
Mrs. Alma Marla Upchurch Spell
ings. <
Ha had originally been charged
with murder, but the court accept
ed the lesser charge.
Defense Attorney George An
derson even asked Judge WaIk
(CONTINUED ON PAGE t)
Negro Church
Group Votes
For ‘Mixing’
GREENSBORO— United Church of
Christ delegates voted unanimously
here last week to merge with two
white conferences of that church to
form a single administrative organ
ization.
Discussing the merger were dele
gates to the two white conferences,
who were in session here. The three
groups met together for s joint
i ( ONIIMItn OV ('»( 1 ’>
Registrars,
Cops Blamed
For Delays
ENFIELD The first Freedom
Day in rigidly aogrogatod Halifax
County resulted In registration es
300 Negroes to vote, raising too to
tal In the county to over 2.000.
11)18 was done In the face at de
laying tactics by registrars and ha
rassment by police. The latter to
eluded setting off of a stench bomb
in police headquarters attar the
polling place was moved there from
its regular location.
“In some places It was as M
as anything In Mississippi.” auto
John R. Halter Jr., white, field
organiser far too Southern COst
feronce Educational Fund (BC
EF). Salter, wha organised pro
tests In Jackson, Mias., last year,
Is aiding toe Halifax Vetera
Movement to too registration
drive.
More Negroes are running for of
fice In Halifax County than In any
county In the South since Recon
struction. Eleven are seklng coun
ty-wide offlcee and one is a candi
date for Congress.
Salter said that in some places
registrars took half an hour to reg
ister applicant. And registrar took
throe hours for lunch. In another
place, the registrar refused to toll
applicants whether they wore reg
istered or not Salter noted toot
this is a familiar tactic In Missis
sippi.
He said that proteats have boon
sent to state officials and to the
Justice Department in Washington.
Very Intensive legal aetton ia toe
Federal Courts la also llktly. ho
adftod.
Two mom Freedom Days are
planned before the May M primary
election.
(EONtarUEP ON PAGE »
Ministers,
I
Laymen Set
Ball Game
Ministers of Raleigh and Wake
County will form a softball team
and play a group of citizens in a
benefit game here Saturday, May
16, at 7 p in. The. game will be play
ed Hi Chavis Park
The Rev. I). V Howard, 8r„
has been named manager of the
riffles' tram, while Ralph
Campbell, Hr., will manage the
laymen's squad.
The baseball gams will b« plsycil
n connection with s barbecue sup
per for the benefit of Clarence E
ißaby) Lightner's and J. J. han
som. Jr.'s campaign fund. Lightner
is treking a seat on the Wake Coun
ty Board of Commissioners, while
, Samson aspires for the State House
of Representatives.
I Promoters of the unusual base
ball game are expecting 4.003 spoo
j tators.
Following Is a partial 11-t of both
teams. A comp'ele list will be pub*
(CONTINI ED (I' P’C" V.
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view