North Carolina Newspapers

    Board Decides To Operate Public Schools
As Now Constituted For School Term 54-55
To Study Problem Until
Final Decree Made By
Supreme Court
North Carolina public schools will
be operated next year, 1954-55, as they
are now constituted, the State Board
of Education decided at its regular
June meeting.
This decision came from the Board
as a result of the United States Su-1
preme Court’s recent decree holding
that segregated schools are unconsti
tutional. The Board's action was tak
en in view of the fact that the Court
has called for a further hearing and
argument this fall before a final de
cree is issued indicating the proced
ures through which non-segregation
shall be implemented and effectuated.
“In view of this and the necessity to
make allotment of teachers and other
arrangements to operate the public
schools of the State for the school
term 1954-55, the Board deems it for 1
the best interests of public education 1
to await the final decree of the Court
and in the meantime operate the pub
lic schools of North Carolina as now
constituted.
“At the request of the Governor, the
State Board, in cooperation with the
State Superintendent of Public In
struction and others, will continue to
study the problem and work toward
the best possible solution. The Board
appeals to every citizen in North Car
olina to remain calm and reasonable
during the consideration of this prob
lem.”
In its decision of May 17. the Board
pointed out, the Court adjudicated a
principle. Each of the cases upon
which the Court used as a basis for
its momentous pronouncement was re
stored to the docket for further argu
ment, in the main on four questions, as I
follows:
1. Should Negro children be admit
ted without further delay to “schools
of their choice”?
2. Should school districts be allow
ed time for a gradual transition to a
non-segregated status?
3. Should the Supreme Court ap
point a special master to hear evidence
and recommend specific terms of de
crees to be ordered by the Court ?
4. Should the high court send the
segregation cases hack to the lower
courts with instructions to form de
crees for implementing the non-segre
gation decision; if so, what procedure
should the lower courts follow in ar
riving at specific terms of the de
crees ?
In the rearguments on these points,
the Attorney General of the United
States has been invited to participate,
and the attorneys general of the states
requiring and permitting segregation
in the public schools have been invit
ed “to appear as amici curiae unon
request to do so by September 15, 1954
and submission of briefs by October 1,
1954.”
In support of its decision of May
17. the Court said that “Segregation
of white and colored children in pub
lic schools has a detrimental effect
upon the colored children. The impact
is greater when it has the sanction of
the law; for the policy of separating
the races is usually interpreted as de
noting the inferiority of the Negro
group. A sense of inferiority affects
the motivation of a child to learn.
Segregation with the sanction of law,
therefore, has a tendency to retard the
educational and mental development of
Negro children and to deprive them of
some of the benefits they would re
ceive in a radically integrated school
system.”
How the decision will affect North
Carolina public schools is not yet
known in view of the fact that the
Court has set the cases for further
hearings on certain points, Both po
litical and educational leaders of the
State, as well as the press, are in the
main taking a “wait and see” ntti
ude. Opinion seems to be that imple
mentation of the Court’s ruling will
take time, much study', and wisdom in
a calm approach to the whole ques
tion.
A reflection in the democratic lead
ership of the State was indicated by
the resounding applause if the dele
gates to ‘lie Si ate Convention held in
Raleigh May 20 to the statement made
by r Irving Carlyle of Winston-Salem
the keynote speaker. Mr. Carlyle said:
“The Supreme Court of the United
States has spoken. As good citizens
we have no other course except to
obey the law as laid down by the
Court. To do otherwise would cost us
our respect for law and order, and if
we lose that in these critical times we
will have lost that quality which is
the source of our strength as a State
and as a Nation.”
Debutante Ball In
Raleigh Sept. 9-11
The Terpsiehorean. Club of Raleigh,
announces that on September 9th, 10th
and 11th it will present the 28th an
nual Debutante Ball. Approximately
155 young ladies of North Carolina
will make their debut. This announce
ment is made by Mr. C. A. Newcomb,
president of the Terpsiehorean Club.
The ball will take place at the Ra
leigh Memorial Auditorium on Fri
day night, September 10 and on Sat
urday night, September 11. Included
in the events of the week-end are: two
evening dances; a morning tea dance;
and various luncheons and parties, in
cluding an afternoon tea at the Gov
ernor’s Mansion.
| Vets Question Box [
Q —l am a Korean veteran and I’m
thinking of opening a business. I will
have to wait for several years in or
der to accumulate enough cash. When
I’m ready, will I be able to get a GI
business loan, or is the program due
to expire soon?
A—You will have plenty of time to
I get your GI loan. The Korean GI Bill
loan program will not expire until ten
years after the end of the present
emergency.
Q —l’m planning to take farm train
ing under the Korean GI Bill, but I
found out I’ll have to pay S3O a month
tuition. My cousin, a World War II
veteran, trained, and the Government
paid his tuition. Why the difference?
A—Your cousin trained under the
World War II GI Bill; you will be
training under the Korean GI Bill.
They are separate laws, and each op
erates differently. Under the Korean
GI Bill, you pay all training expenses
yourself. But you get a single month
ly allowance to help do this. Under
the World War II GI Bill, the VA
paid a veteran’s traning costs.
Morehead City Port
Inaugurates Cruises
For the first time in the history of
North Carolina’s ports, pleasure cruis
es to the vacation islands of the At
lantic and Carribean are now avail
able from the Port of Morehead City.
A total of four deluxe cruises will bo
conducted from the port this fall
aboard the Swedish Motorship “Stock
holm”, a new trans-Atlantic liner.
The Stockholm’s premier cruise,
scheduled for October 16, will mark
the beginning of a series of annual
cruises to be conducted from the More
head City port. Havana, Cuba, and
Nassau, capitol of the Bahamas, are
the ports of call on the maiden voy
age.
Reservations are available now. Citi
zens from 32 states have already book
ed passage for one of the cruises this
fall, in addition to hundreds of North
Carolinians.
LIKE NORTH CAROLINA
New parks, roadside tables, and im
proved highways in North Carolina
are bringing appreciative responses
from tourists.
Director Ben E. Douglas of the De
partment of Conservation and Devel- j
opment says the volume of “thank |
you” notes received from travellers is |
i increasing.
mmon Dow* **>-*»«
YOU can see for yourself the gay and
gorgeous styling that’s sure to be the
fresh note next year, too.
And you can easily learn that here is
power a-plenty—the highest V 8 power,
Series for Series, in the annals of Buick
history.
But what you can never know, till you
try it yourself, is the feel of a Buick in
motion.
It’s a ride as precision -soft and firm as
only coiled steel can make it.
Yes, coil springs on all four wheels. And
a full-length torque-tube drive for true
tracking. And a massive X-braced frame
tor solid steadiness. And specially cali
brated shock absorbers, V- braced struts,
1 " 1 WHOI BETTER AUTOMOBILES ARE BUILT BUICK WIU. WHO THEM ■ ' ■■■
CHAS. H. JENKINS MOTOR COMPANY Inc.
105 to 109 E. Queen Street PHONE 147 Edenton,N. G
THE CHOWAN HERALD, LDENTON. N. C.. T&TTRSDAT JULY 29, 1954.
COTTON FRESH! j
Cool and fresh on a mltrj wn»
mer afternoon, this pretty miao
wear* a trim cotton frock in a re
freshing color, aeafoam green. Her
dress, designed by Nali-Bee, is in a
rich, textured Everglaxe cotton with
rhinestone and cord trim. Hie cot
ton fabric has a wrinkle-resistant
finish.
FOR 2 YEARS
Family Policy ... $lO.
(inc. children to 18)
Individual Policy ... $5.
less than $ 2.50 a year
protects your income
f: - -cisit/e polio expenses!
PARKER HELMS
204 BANK OF EDENTON BUILDING
PHONE 175-W
home OFFiCF ■
COLUMBUS B
0,4,0 jS
| Apple Association Board
Approves New By-Laws
Members of the board of directors
of the newly formed N. C. Apple
Growers Association have approved a
constitution and by-laws which will
be presented to the membership at the
next general meeting.
M. E. Gardner, head of the depart
ment of horticulture, N. C. State Col
lege, said the directors also mapped
plans for an immediate membership
campaign.
The directors also voted to purchase
a color motion picture, “Gateway to
Health,” which tells the story of ap
ples and health. The movie will be
shown throughout the state to vari
ous civic, social, fraternal and welfare
groups in an effort to promote a more
widespread use of North Carolina ap
ples. Purchase of the movie is the as
sociation’s first concrete step in its
forthcoming promotion campaign.
Truman Nold, executive secretary of
the National Apple Institute, Wash
ington, D. C., spoke to the beard mem
bers, who met in North Wilkesboro.
Nold termed North Carolina as one of
the nation’s few “coming” apple
states. He said North Carolina has
distinct advantages over many other
states, particularly in new apple plant
ings.
Only Advisory
Bump: “Has your wife learned to
drive the car yet?”
Bumper: “Yes. In an advisory ca
pacity.”
FARM BUREAU MUTUAL
PROTECTION AGAINST
POLIO
Along with the ravages of
polio, count the skyrocketing medical
expenses incurred. The burden may be
unbearable apart from the heart-break
of the physical problem. Dependable
Farm Bureau insurance protects you
against the unforeseen. Pays polio
medical expenses to $9,000 per easel
wide-rim wheels, a unique front-end
geometry—plus a host of other better
ments too numerous to mention.
You feel the result of this advanced
engineering every mile you drive —in
what is literally and figuratively a Million
Dollar Ride.
You feel it in the superb and buoyant
cradling. You feel it in the serene level
ness of your going over ruts and ridges.
You feel it in the precise snubbing of jars
and jounces. You feel it in a new kind of
steadiness, handling ease, curve control.
Only thing for you to do, we believe, is
to come try this miracle of motion—and
we’ll be glad to oblige.
That way you’ll also learn firsthand about
Corby’s Reserve Blended Whiskey is dis
tilled from selected, choice grains only.
The base whiskey is brought to maturity
in charred white-oak barrels, stored in i
temperature-controlled warehouses.
Before it is bottled, it is rigidly and scien
tifically inspected to insure full quality.
*
i/s !
RESERVE BLENDED WHISKEY-86 PROOF-31.6% STRAIGHT WHISKEY. FOUR YEARS OR MORE :
0LD—68.4% GRAIN NEUTRAL SPIRITS-JAS. BARCLAY & CO. LIMITED, PEORIA, ILLINOIS I
Try A Herald Gassified Ad For Quick Results!
the style, the power, and the value that
have made Buick such a best-selling
success this year. For Buick today is out
selling all other cars in America except two
of the so-called “low-price three. ”
(Smart tip: With Buick such a beautiful
buy this year, think what a winner it’s
bound to be at trade-in time! Come see
us this week!)
SECTION TwO-
Page Three
    

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