North Carolina Newspapers

    PAGE TWO
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R»v. Charles W. Dick
Three Churches Join
Three churches in Cho
wan County next week
will participate in The
Crusade of the America’s,
termed one of the greatest
evangelistic crusades of
history.
Macedonia Baptist
Church, Rocky Hock Bap
tist Church and Center Hill
Baptist Church will all
conduct a series of revival
services next week.
More than 20 million
Baptists in approximately
100,000 churches are mobil
izing to cover North, Cen
tral and South America in
1969 in the special cru
sade.
Theme for the services is
“Christ, the Only Hope.”
Services at Macedonia
will begain at 11 A. M.
‘License’ Needed By Homblower
By JOEL ARRINGTON
Outdoor Editor, C. Travel
and Promotion Division
BAKERSVILLE A. D.
Harrell sat on a rock pile,
placed the muzzle of the
double-barreled shotgun
against his lips and blew a
long plaintive wail. It
was louder than I expect
ed and echoed through the
hollow with ghostly rever
beration.
“From the top of one of
these ridges,’’ he said, point
ing to the Mitchell County
terrain surrounding us,
“you could hear that for a
..Wile or more.’’
Harrell owns a dairy
flfliu near here. Some days
there is just no time for
grouse hunting. Yesterday,
for example, in addition to
daily milking and feeding
chores, he played midwife
to a cow and settled the
estate of a deceased mule
which came out on the
short end of an encounter
with a truck. But most
Saturdays and many week
days during the season he
may be found poking
around Mitchell and Yan
cey county laurel “slicks”
and rhododendron “hells”
with his pointer' bitch and
one or more friends and
ME
Sterling
iii^
TO COMMEMORATE ITS
75TH YEAR j
save 25%
on WTTiUiin
£. T. Davis & Co.
fek JEWELERS
LAferf To Taylor Theatre
'JL Edenton, N. C.
_,, ~
.■ ML M
H»t. Johnnie Bradley
Sunday with Rev. Charles
W. Dick of Western Heights
Baptist Church, Peters
burg, Va., as guest evan
gelist. Services will be
held nightly at 7:30 o’clock
through Friday.
Mr. Dick received his
theological training at the
New Orleans Baptist Sem
inary. He is married and
has two children.
The music will be under
the direction of Woodrow
Lowe.
Rev. Johnnie Bradley,
pastor of Calvary Baptist
Church in Rocky Mount,
will be preaching at Rocky
Hock at 7:45 P. M. Mon
day through Sunday, in
cluding Saturday. He is
well known in this area,
guests. Today he was
helping me host Jan Won
grey, outdoor writer for a
South Carolina newspaper.
“Several years back,”
Harrell continued, “I was
grouse hunting not too far
from here with a friend
and somehow we got sep
arated. Hoping he was
within hearing distance, I
blew my gun barrel, wait
ed a few minutes, and
blew it again. Well, it
worked, and when we got
together again my hunting
partner told me about the
darndest thing that hap
pened. He said he was
sitting on a stump resting
when he heard me blow
the barrel. Suddenly a
boy came running down
the mountain by him so
fast he didn’t see my part
ner sitting there. He
stopped in a ditch down a
ways from the stump and
covered himself with
leaves. Then when I blew
the second time, the boy
exploded from under the
leaves and fled, obviously
in panic, on down the
mountain out of sight.”
Wongrey winked at me
and we hunkered down as
Harrell went on with the
story,
THE CHOWAM HERALD, EDEWTOH, WORTH CAROUKA, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, lit*.
Rot. Kenneth Gibson
In Crusade
having pastored here prior
to going to Rocky Mount.
Congregational singing
and special music will be
under the direction of Jack
Evans.
At Center Hill, Rev.
Kenneth Gibson, pastor of
Canton Baptist Church,
Albemarle, will be guest
evangelist. The services
begin at 7:30 P. M. Sun
day and continue through
Saturday.
Mr. Gibson taught in the
public schools before en
tering Kentucky Baptist
College and later South
eastern Baptist Seminary.
A nursery is provided
fcr each service and the
public is cordially invited
to attend.
“I was teaching at the
local high school at the
time,” he said, “so I asked
around among the stu
dents. In a day or two I
found the boy and inquir
ed about what had hap
pened.
“ ‘I was deer huntin’ out
of season up there,’ he
told me, ‘and never had
been that far from home
by myself before, and I
was g little uneasy. I
don’t know whether I was
scared of being caught or
of being off by myself.
Then about dark I heard
this horn blow from way
off. First thing jumped in
my mind was that it was
the end of time and Gab
riel was blowin’ his horn.
I figured the best place for
me was with my kin. I
thiew down my gun and
ran down the mountain,
but then I decided I’d be
safe if I hid. So I cov
ered up with leaves in a
little ditch. But in a few
minutes I heard Gabriel
blow again and figured
he’d seen me, so I lit out
for the house. Course,
when nothing came of it
all night, I began to feel
easy again’.”
Wongrey and I found
the story humorous but ex
pressed good-natured doubt
about its veracity. Now,
A. D. Harrell is a man of
unquestioned integrity and
has never been reported to
take liberty with the truth.
When pressed, however, he
admits that certain license
is permitted in these mat
ters when slight embellish
ment of the facts makes
for a better story.
In any regard, Harrell
takes no chances now on
scaring boys in the woods.
He carries a whistle.
to (dfiemembel
By tunvn BJUUUM
Many of us can sum up those
j simply stating: ‘1 want happiness for me and
my family.”
“To study without thinking is waste of time;
To think without studying is dangerous.”
We don’t particularly want this happiness
handed to us—we want to feel we have deserved
it through our own contributions and personal
efforts. An inner-instinct tells us nothing worth- 4 *
while is obtained without effort. Common sense
tells us that roses will have thorns—and any
adequate road bed has a hard-rock base. Four
thousand years of recorded history has taught us
this fact.
One of our most unfair criticisms of others is:
‘They have had it handed to them.”
Take a good look at our heritage. We cannot
ignore our many great legacies—our freedom—
our prosperity— our way of life! These were
fought for and won by our forefathers. People
who removed many thorns and labored on the
hard-rock roadbeds. And didn’t they impi.nj
most of the noble ideals within us?
It is well that we remind ourselves that we,
too, will be die forefathers of future genera*
tions and we will be handing them something
eitner good or bad.
Colonial Funeral Home
SSm*m, IViftt CmUm
j BROAD STREETjMH
bulletin^H
KATE WM
Get me some Biz and get me some Axion
While I sit down with a good cup of Maxim;
[ Let me start my morning with a swig of Scope
[ And keep my skin soft with Palmolive Soap.
Then keep my day from a “Total” loss,
And my complexion clear with Irish Moss;
If then I find that money comes hard
I can always use that Credit Card.
To keep your talk quite controversial
Be sure to watch each TV commercial.
The above I call (Soap
Opera).
As of Tuesday all the
pyracyntha berries are gone
from our neighborhood. A
huge flock of cedar wax
wings made their annual
tour and in short time
those beautiful birds got
their tummies full and left
for redder pastures.
I read in the Women’s
Medical New Pamphlet an
article on reasons for
hurting feet and one doc
tor states that when you
purchase new shoes, one
way to know if your toes
will be pinched is to place
your heel in the shoe and
allow the remainder of the
foot to rest over the shoe.
Wherever your foot ex
tends over the shoe, trouble
brews.
In another article which
I read recently concerning
school drop-outs, poverty
and juvenile delinquency,
the blame for much of
these problems is Absent
Fathers. Absent or weak
fathers help to break up
many families and children
of such families have dif
ficulty of becoming ma
ture or responsible adults.
When either parent, in
fact, is absent because of
death, divorce or separa
tion, our society should
find ways to fill the gap.
No child should be allow
ed to grow up without the
companionship of adult
men and women.
ATTENTIONI Parents
and young people, too. By
all means, go to the show
ing of “Tne Restless Ones"
at the Taylor Theater,
starting Thursday of this
week. I’ll guarantee that
you will long remember
this picture and be very
glad you went.
Here is a recipe for
spicy Pumpkin Pie, sent to
me by Mrs. Lucy Farless.
It sounds delicious and as
soon as I can eat sweets
again I shall make this pie
and eat most of it myself.
Melt 2 tablespoons but
ter, then add 1% cups of
fresh or frozen pumpkin,
1 tsp. ginger, 1 tsp. cinna
mon, V« tsp. mace and Vs
tsp. cloves. Beat 2 eggs
until frothy, and add 2
tbsp. flour, V 4 cup brown
sugar, % cup white sugar,
% tsp. salt, 1 cup canned
milk. Combine mixtures
gently. Pour into unbak
ed pie shell and bake at
450 degrees for 15 min
utes. Reduce heat to 375
degrees and cook for 45
minutes. Serve with whip
ped cream.
(Thank you very much,
Mrs. Farless).
A Few Hints
Girls, if you’re always
losing your bobby pins or
even safety pins in your
handbag, let me tell you
an easy way to keep them
collected. Simply find an
old key case and hook
your pins inside.
Use an old tooth brush
to clean along the back
bone when cleaning fish.
Male Dove Os Peace
“Jack and I have part
ed forever.”
‘Good gracious! What
does that mean?”
“A five - pound box of
candy in about an hour.”
Anyone is entitled to an
opinion, but no one has a
right to be wrong in re
lation to the facts.
—Bernard Baruch.
WE Are Celebrating Our 16th
_ L W
UlliißSflßfl
1 *'#i.VVr
FRIDAY And SATURDAY
And Invite You To Join With Us For FREE Refreshments And
Drawing For Prizes Os Bags Os Groceries, A Gwaltney Ham,
Turkey And Many More Valuable Prizes.
Below We List A Few Os The Specials For This Event...
SMOKED OWAUTNEY
PICNICS BACON
«>. 39c lb. 59(
SMOKED GILL’S HOTEL SPECIAL
SAUSAGE COFFEE
3 lbs. SI.OO Ib. 59t
■ - - 11 ■
Morton’s 18-oz. No. 303 Size
TV Dinners Grape Jelly ap S hower Peas
each 39c jar 29c SI.OO
Frozen . Mrs. Filbert’s I Mrs. Filbert’s
French Fries Oleo Salad Dressing
29c it-25c pi** 29c
No. 2Vi Size 14-oz. Del-Monte No. ZVz Del-Monte
Pork and Beans Catsup Peaches
3 can * 59c 2 bowfea 43c 3 cans sl.oo
WESSON OIL ......... 24-oz. bottle 49c
Light Docket
Aired In Court
Eight cases were tried
in Chowan County District
Court Tuesday with Judge
W. S. Privott presiding.
Probable cause was
found in the case where
William Rasco was charg
ed with embezzlement.
Judge Privott set Rasco’s
bond at SSOO for his ap
pearance in Superior
Court.
Clarence Walker, who
was called and failed to
appear last week, was
convicted of passing a
worthless check. He was
sentenced to six months,
suspended upon payment
of SIOO fine and costs. He
gave notice of appeal and
bond was set at S2OO.
In other cases called by
Solicitor Wilton Walker,
the following action was
taken:
Warren Wynn Brown,
speeding, nol pros with
leave.
Hildred Brothers, Jr.,
traffic violation, 30 days,
suspended upon payment
of $25 fine and costs.
Casper Overton, larceny,
nol pros.
Rufus Whitaker, assault
on a female, 30 days, sus
pended upon payment of
$lO fine and costs.
William Alphonso Bow
ser, speeding, 30 days, sus
pended upon payment of
S2O fine and costs.
Alfred Lee Holley, as-i
sault with a deadly weap
on, 10 days, suspended up- 1
on payment of costs.
Fee Quick Results. Try
A HERALD CLASSIFY i
FARMERS TO MEET
Another in a series of
organizational meetings of
National Farmers Organiz
ation will be held Monday
night at Ghowan Commun
ity Building. The meeting
begins at 7:30 o’clock and
all interested farmers are
urged to attend.
Every man is best known
to himself.
How to lose
5 a lot of weight
safely
Maybe you’ve been in our
pharmacy and noticed all the
ways there are to lose weight.
Pills, tablets, capsules—all
kinds. Most are designed to
reduce your appetite—and thus, you. All well and
good, but if you have a serious weight problem,
there is only one sensible thing to do. See your
physician. He will prescribe a diet, tailored to
your condition, with proper drugs and nutritive
supplements to make it safe and sure. We, as
pharmacists, dispense these more potent drugs
only at his direction—a practice which exists for
one reason—to protect your health.
HollowelVs
Rexall Drug Store
TWO REGISTERED PHARMACISTS -:-
Registered Pharmacist Always on Duty
Phone 482-2127 Prompt Delivery
High-Pressure Operation
Test chambers capable
of duplicating pressured
found many thousands of
feet under the sea are be
ing used to evaluate mod
els of
research and rescue ves
sels. One such chamber
uses 750 tons of nickel
containing steel and has
walls 16 inches thick.
    

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