North Carolina Newspapers

    . 'HE CAROLINA INDIAN VOICE
Published each Thursday by First American Publications, NC
JUMBER 27 THURSDAY. JULY 3, 1997 TWENTY-FIVE CENTS
Twenty Swett High Teachers & Counselors
Learning New Skills in Computer Lab at UNCP
Pembroke - "Comparing the
knowledge 1 had coming in Mth the
knowledge 1 have now, it's outstanding."
said Purncll Swell High School
teacher Boss Locklcar.
Before participating in a tw o-w eek
Internet workshop sponsored by the
physical science department at The
University of North Carolina at Pembroke.
Mr Locklcar had never seen
the world wide web. Today, he is
building his own "home page" on
the Internet w ith links to a world of
information which he can use in
teaching Vocational Education
courses
The project, which includes funds
for wiring Mr. Locklcar's classroom
to the Internet, is funded through
UNCP by a $.10,000 federal
EiscnhowcrGrant coordinated by the
North Carolina Science and Math
Institute
twenty Purncll Swell High School
teachers and counselors were in a
computer lab at UNCP for tw o weeks
of basic Internet instruction from
June 16-27. Besides learning about
e-mail, surfing the net and building
a home page, the grant will give
teachers practical ideas for using the
world w idc web of information in the
classroom
Project director for the grant is
Dr. Jose DArruda. chairofthc physical
science department
"The Eisenhower Grant is going
to pay off well for the teachers." Dr.
D" Arruda said "Most knew little or
nothing about the Internet, but every
time I go down there they have made
progress"
The Internet project consists of
six workshops, but classroom instruction
is only the beginning. Dr.
D"Arruda said Six UNCP professors
will go to the high school as onc-ononc
mentors for the teachers.
"The Internet is like a library in
the classroom." Dr. D'Arruda said.
"But the onlywav to learn any kind
of computing is to do what they arc
doing by sitting down and getting
their hands on it with expert instruction
backing them up.
"We at UNCP need to do more
with thehighschools." hesaid. "I've
been here for 24 years and can remember
workingWith a NSF (National
Science Foundation)grant with
the schools on Apple lie computers
"
D Arruda's pioneering efforts
continue to pay dividends as he ushers
another generation of teachers
through another technological frontier
of computing.
While Boss Locklcar looked
through an Internet site on house
construction plans. French teacher
Melody Gill toured France. A recent
college graduate. Gill is computer
trained but found new uses for the
I nlcrnel in the classroom at the workshop
"I am looking for links to put on
my home page so that my students
will be able to see and hear French
language and culture." she said "I
cannot leach then) all the things that
the French can. I'm also looking for
(e-mail) pen pals "
Although she was familiar with
the resources oflhc Internet. Gill has
learned some new applications "I
have learned mam things I did not
knowshe said "We went to a' net
meeting where we actually saw the
people we were talking to Our computers
had video cameras, so thc\
saw us too "
The computer skillsofsocial studies
teacher Jerry Jones and physical
education teacher Nancy Ow en (bot h
UNCP graduates) fall somewhere
between Locklcar and Gill, Both arc
new to the Internet and fascinated by
there sources available to them
"I teach a minority studies class
and I'm looking for Nalixc American
and African American sites that
I can link them to m> home page."
Jones said "The key is if the school
can gel on line and gel us a computer
then this will be \aluablc "
Owen was scanning siteson plwsical
rehabilitation of sports injuries
for a class she is teaching on sports
medicine
"There are not a lot of classroom
malcrialsavailnblcforthiscoursc. so
lvc done searches in physical thcrap>
and rehab." Owen said. "I've ordered
a catalogue and some other
free materials including one from an
anatomical supply company
"1 think the Internet will be very
?
useful." she said "This is good for
me because there have been a lot of
changes in computing since I was at
Pembroke in the 1980s."
Dr Lcs/ck Pialkicwic/. assistant
professor of mathematics and computer
science taught the Internet
workshop He was impressed with
his pupils' progress
"They arcdoingjusi fine. Teachers
make good students ." he said
" About halfhavc been on the I ntcrnct
before, but wcalwayshavc people on
different levels."
Dr Pialkicwic/ noted several applications
he was working on during
the workshop including creating a
home page for each teacher located
on a computer server at UNCP "I
want them to create a home page for
their students to hnv ca^wfes to in the
classroom " lie said "They may create
links to any other site on the
Internet for the students to use in
doing research
"We have also worked with network
news (chat rooms) so they c-an
discuss am subject with anyone in
the world." lie said
Whether its French or carpentry,
the .Internet is a link tot eh world for
teachers. Dr Pialkicwic/. believes.
And UNCP is the teacher's Hnk to
the Internet .'
For more information on the
Fiscnltowcr Grant program, vou mav
call Dr D'Arruda at 521-6423.
Miss Lumbee Says Farewell
Rcbckah Revels. Miss Lumbcc.
wilj relinquish her crown July 4.
1997 but she will continue to honor
the Lumbec people with dignity, grace
and love, Rebekah has traveled over
24,000 miles to 16 slates and Washington.D.C.
duringhcr reign totouch
the lives of thousands of people with
the story of the Lumbcc people and
how important it is to respect our
elders and learn about our culture
Rcbckah has sung, spoke and danced
her way into thousands of hearts in
making more than 165 appearances^
and performing this past year.
Although Rcbckah is the most
traveled Miss Lumbcc. she stresses
quality not quantity in appearances.
Most of the pow wows she attended
last 2-4 days and she averaged 10-12
hours per day each pow wow day
"People appreciate you spendi ng li nic
at their function, not just showing up
to be seen, but talking, relaxing and
cnjoyingthcircompanv and the functions
they worked hard to make a
success." Rcbckah said "I loved
spending hours as Miss Lumbcc."
She continued "The Miss L.unibcc
title and crown one of great
importance that should be honored at
all times with dignity, honesty and
respect. Miss Lumbcc represents all
of the 47.0OO+ Lumbcc all of the
time."
Rcbckah dedicated her reign to
the memory of her cousin. Loric
Strickland, daughter of Daniel and
Cherry Strickland, who died with
cancer in 1995. Lorie was well known
for smiling regardless of what blows
life dealt to her and Rebekah's smile
has also brought happiness to many.
Rebekah feels that Loric would smile
upon her reign and be v ers proud of
her
Love for Miss Lumbcc was cxidcnccd
at the Lumbcc Queens Farewell
Tea o Sunday as he was honored
by contestants friends, family, and
her church. Many came forthlo attest
to Rebekah's helpfulness, love for the
Lumbcc people honesty, smiles,
know ledge and dignity She w as presented
many beautiful gifts. HcraunL
Cherry Strickland presented
Rebekah with a coverlet, a family
heirloom, made by her grandmother.
Mrs. Lulu Carter Hunt Rebekah's
-J grandmother died w ith cancer before
she was born
Ten Mile Maplist Church presented
Rebekah with a surprise portrait
ofMiss Lumbcc by artist Karl A
Hunt, which was painted from photographs
Rebekah's little sisters. Junior Miss
Morgan Hunt and Little Miss Angelica
Chavis arc precious and dear
to her hear. The families have traxclcd
extensively (his past year and
many memories arc heart stored As
Rebekah dedicated friendsand friends
forever to her little sister, the tears
flowed as she honored them
As a last tribute, as Miss l.tinibcc.
Rebekah Rex els honors her ( reator.
parents. l.RDA. family, church,
friends, lox cd ones and ex cry person
xxho has touched hci life this past
year in a posilixc wax
Representing the Lumbcc people
with dignity and pride Rebekah's
last xvords to lis as Miss Lumbcc arc:
"HEART GIFTS"
It's not the things that can be bought
that arc life's richest treasure,,.,. ?
It's just the little "heart gifts" w
that money cannot measure..;
A cheerful smile, a friendly word,
a sympathetic nod
Are priceless little treasures
from the storehouse of our God...
They are the things that can't be bought
with silver or with gold,
For thoughtfulncss and kindness
and love arc never sold...
They are the priceless things in life
for which no one can pay.
And the giver linds rich recompense
in g/r/'ttg them auuty.
Rehekah was honored hy her family and church, Jen Mile center
Itaptist Church on June 22, 19V 7 with u surprise Farewell Social in the
church fellowship huildinp.
i, (ilenda Revels, Sunday school'teacher, Eurnie Hammonds, Castor;
Miss l.umhee, Rehekah Revels, R ondo Hammonds, Castor's wife, Joyce
l.mvry, Sunday school toucher shown left to ripht.
Pastor Hammonds made warm and wonderful comments about Rehek ah
as he announced the surprise social. Many dear friends ami family
members including Junior Miss l.umhee Morgan Hunt and her mother,
Hemetrice Hunt, joined Rehekah for the social.
Ten Mite Center Huptist ( hurch us f>iven outstanding support to Miss
I nmbee this year H e love you, Rehekah
Mclntyre Co-Sponsors Recognition Bill
to Help Lumbee Recognition Efforts
Washington, D.C. - Seventh District
Congressman Mike Mclnlyre
announced today that he hasco-sponsored
legislation in tbo-lkS. Houseot
Representatives that would create an
independent commission that would
help the LunibeC Indians achieve
federal recognition
Mclnlyre is calling on Congress
to pass HR 1154. the Indian Federal
Recognition Administration Procedures
Act of 1997, This bill would
create an independent commission
to evaluate Native American applications
for recognition. The Commission
would be made up of three
presidential appointees (no more than
two from the same political party and
no more than one from the same
American Indian tribe). The commission
would review applications,
make grants for application research
(e.g.. research thc_ genealogy of a
tribe), hold hearing's and grant tribal
recognition Once the commission
recognizes a tribe, the tribe would be
eligible to participate in Federal programs.
including the specific land
treaties with the Federal government
Congressman Mclnlyre continued.
"This bill, if enacted, would
remove the politics from the l-umbcc
Federal recognition process and give
us a much better and fairer opportunity
to get recognition. As everyone
knows, neither the Congress nor the
bureau of Indian Affairs have yet
granted recognition The Lumbcc
mm ? - ? ? -
people have been working for many
years for Federal recognition through
this current process, and it is now
clear thai a new approach is needed
' Be assured 1 will be working feverishly
lo push for enactment of HR
1154."
Congressman Mclntyrc staled
"Since January I have been researching
and evaluating every possible
option to pursue the long sought
Federal recognition for the Liimbcc
people In fact, our ofTicc has documented
and studied every singlccongressional
bill, from 1888 to 1996
that would grant this recognition
After extensive discussions with
Native American leaders, we have
concluded that the congressional and
federal proccdurcscurrcnlly in place
have not been working, and a new
approach is needed to give the Lumbcc
people their much deserved Fed
cral recognition "
HR 1154 is supported by both the
Lumbcc Regional Development Association
and the Lumbcc Tribal
Council . ;
Mclntyrc further added that his
o(Ticc is still "exploring the feasibility
of enacting a separate bill by
which Congress would grant the
Lumbccs Federal recognition However.
such a bill has never succeeded
in the past, and the prospects continue
to look unfavorable That is
why it is rnv hope that this new
approach .will be the long-soughlahcr
success needed "
mmberly Hunt is a graduate of
Northfield Mount Hernton School
Northficld Mass -- Kimbvrlx
Hunl. the daughter ofEric D Hum of
PembrokeVNe. and Karnicl Brooksy
also of Pembroke is a l')')7gradnn||C
*of Northficld Moumllcrnion School
n Massachusclls independent colIcgc-prcpnratorx
boarding school
She has completed a IW7 Apprcnliccshipprogrnmintcrnslnpxxiih
the Garbcr Talent Agency in Nexx
York She has performed in the I'Wi
Theatre Program production of
Much Ado About Nothing" and
has served on the Class Steering
Committee and as a campus lour
guide A member of the NMH Dance
Company, she has volunteered
through the Outreach Program xx ilh
a Martin Luther K ing Jr Workshop
a Bosnia Relief Fund Project, the
school's National Serxicc Dax a
Peace Pagoda Project, and as a teacher
of a Children's Interest Group in
dance. A member of the junior basketball
team and manager of the
boys' varsity swimming and football
teams, she has participated in the
American Indian Student Association
andattendedthe I9')4 American
Indian Science and Engineering Society
Conference She has studied
Advanced Placement U S History
and attended the NMH Advanced
Summer Studies program A member
of "Who's Who Among American
High School Students, she has
earned the "I Dare You' Leadership
Award A Better Chance. Community
and Dr Rosa Mmoka Hill Fund
Scholar, she also is the recipient of
vrlie Charles Curtis Scholarship Fund
f Award She Iras taken part in the
Broadway Dance Center and Steps
on Broadway program A member of
Association in the Interest of a
Multicultural School Circle of Sisters
and the Robeson County 4-H
she assisted in the PRISM Orientation
Workshop
She also Iras earned academic
honors for the IW7 spring term
She will .attend the University of
Southern California, rnajoring iit
theater and foreign studies
Northficld Mount Hcrmon. established
in 1X7*). is located on twin
campuses along the Connecticut
River in rural Northficld and Gill.
Mass The class of I9?)7 included
^y) seniors aird postgraduates
\
Celebrates 96th Birthday
Mrs. Eunice Sampson of Pembroke, NC celectrated her 96th birthday
recently. Family and friends gathered at Linda's Restaurant to honor the
great grandmother. The dinner was given by her son and daughter-in-law,
James and Linda Smapson and her daughter and son-in-law, Sarah and
Buddy Belt
Honored guests were her brother, Mr. Ancil Sanderson, andher sister,
Mrs. Elizabeth McGirt. Mrs Sampson has one other brother, Mr. John ?
Sanderson ivho lives in Cocoa Beach. Flordia.
Left to ripht: Murphy Strickland. the honoree \v brother, Jackie Strickland,
(son), Mr. Robert Stricklaml, am! Robert l ee Strickland (son).
Celebrates 90th Birthday!
Mr Robert Strickland celebrated
his Wilt birthday Saturday. June 21st
at Deep Branch Church Fellowship
Hall Mr Strickland is the son of the
late Arleandl.nla Strickland oCl. umbcrton.
NC Htcisprobabls one of the
oldest lis ing StricklaiuK in Robeson
Count) When asked what he attributed
his long life to. he said "I
alsvass honored andobesed nw parents
Mr. Robert married Dollie
l.oeklear (now deceased) in l')V>
During World War II. the) ntoscd to
Wilmington. NC looking for work in
the ship sard While there both were
trained to be welders Thex worked
on L.ibcrl\ Cargo Ships At the close
of World War II Mi Strickland
came back to Robeson Counts and
made his home in the Deep Branch
conimmiil) lie continued in his occupation
as a welder while lus wife
and children farmed He retired form
Wcslpoinl Pcppcrcll as Lead Welder
in the Maintenance Department in
I *>7 V Hisbcloved wife. Dollic. shared
60 years w illi him She departed this
life November 22. I'Wft.
Mr Robert lives with is daughter,
l-stellc Hodges. 2 miles below Deep
Branch Clmreh. where he attends
c\ crv Sunday During the prist 45
years of his members, he has served
in several different capacities. For 24
years of his membership. Ik has been
a Deacon }lc attributes his health,
keen mind and willy sense of honor
to obedience to God first and his
parents, second
He and Ms Dollie s children arc
Robert I.. Strickland Jr . Lucille
F.mery. I slcllc Hodges. Jackie
Strickland.Bobby R Strickland and
Jerlene Hunt The children arc so
thankful and blessed to have had a
falhei and mother with such a spiritual
impact upon their lives
    

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