North Carolina Newspapers

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North-Carolina Chronicle ; or.
4 i
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i-rN-2,of Vol. II. M O M D A Y, SEPTEMBER
1
1790.
Total K- 54.
HISTORT.
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Carvers travels.
Continued.)
HE Green Bay or Bay of Pucnts is
L one of 'thefe places to which the
fnchhare given nicknames; it istermed
" vfhe inhabitants of its coaft, the Mono
:anie Bay ; but why the French have
.dcae-minated it the Puant, or Stinking
jBaj, I knovrnoiv The reafon they them-
i iclrcs give fori it is, that it was not with
. c view 10 muiaci itrangcrs, but mat by
, adopting thij method they coulel converfe
, :,i?ith each other concerning the Indians,
their prefence, without bcipg undcr--apd
by them.j For it was-remarked by
.'A c perfons who firft traded among them,
that when thejr were fpeaking to each
,'ot!er abut them, an 4 ientioaed thtir
; t proper name, they infrantly grew fufpiei
N ,ou$,and concluded that their vifitors
T.-cre either fpeaking ill of them, or plot
is their deftniiAion.- To remedy this
' they gave then ibme ether name. .The
Only had confequenre arifing from the
; prafrice then introdaccci Ut that Enplilh
, . ZTjd French gicgf; ?! ei s, their p'ans
... 'of interior prvrts ef America, give diife
relet names to the ram.r people, and there
.v perplex rhoic who have oecafion to
refer to 'hrvn.
L.nkc Michigan, of v.;i, h the Green
Bay is a r-r:. is divided on the Wcrth-
J ' - lali from Liks; Hurrn by the ftraijhts
cS Michiilimakifiac ; an J is fituati be
II' ' tifeen iort; -twoiaud forty-Ox degrees of
j'- nrthlatituie, &ibteen eighty-fourand
4 cigbtyfevsn decrees of d lrngitu.de.
sits greatril length it two hundred and
- itWTtv !c Kt o-?tli V-rtir Vit-t- frA
I its? circumference nearly fix hundred,
j, There is a remarkable filing of fmall ill
I r ids, beginning over agatnft Allan's
I . m,nnd running abdut 30 miles into
; lake. 1 iine are cnlied the Heaver
ana's. Th-ir fim iticn :s very pleafanf,
t the foil i bare. However they af
fd a beautiful profped.
On theNerth Weft psrts of ibis Like
I waters branch out into two bars :
pt which lies towards the North is the
J of Noqucts, and the other the Green
Cji'.ft defcribcy.
The wleis of this, as v;SA as the
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other great lakes, are clear and v. hole
feme, and of fufficient depth for the na
vigation cf iaigt ftipi. Half the fpacc
cf the country that lies ti tlie Ea.fr, and
extends to .Lake Huron, belongs to the
Ottowaw Indians. The line that divides
their territories ficm the Chipewaiys
rnasneaily North and SoiuIb, and reach
es almoft from the Southern extremity
of this lake, acrofs the highlands, to
Michillimakirac, througk the centre cf
which it paffes. So that -when thefe
two tribes happen to meet at the faftory,
they each encamp cn their own domini
ons, at a few yards diftance from tlie
ftcckade.
The country adjacent, either to the
Eaft or Weft fide oi this lake, is eompofed
but of an indifferent foil, except where
fmall brooks or rivers empty themfelvts
iato it ; on the banks cf thefe it is ex
tremely fertile. Nearj th borders of
the lake grow a great mimber of faad
. cherries, which are not jefs remarkable
for their manner of growth, than fot their
exquitite flavour. They grow upon a
fmall ilirab not more than four feet hijh,
the boughs of which are fo loaded that
lhy grow ia clufters on the fand. As
they gfow oaly on the fand, the
warmth of which probably contributes
to brihg them to fuch perfection, they
are called by the French cherries de
fible, or fund cherries. The fiie of
them does exceed that of a fmall muflcet
ball, but they are reckoned fnperior to
any fort. fr the purpofe of fteeping fn
fpirits. There alfo grow arouad the
lake, goofeberries, black currants, and an
abundance of juniper, bearing great
quantities cf berries of the fineft fort.
Snraaek likewife rovs here in great
plenty; the leaf of which, gathered at
Michaelmas, when it turns red, is much
eflcesaed by the natives. They mix
about an equal quantity of it w-ith their
twbacco, whch canfes. it to fmoke plea
fastly. Near this lake, and indeed about
all the great lake?, is found a willow,
termed by the French bois rouge, in En
glifh red wod. Its bark, when only of
one year's growth, is of a fine fcarlct'co
leur and aprtars vfry beautiful ; but as
it grows older it ebknges into a rhixrure
cf g:cy zvdrrd. The flalks of this Oirub
grow many of them together, and rife to
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the heightef fixer eight feet, the hrfck
not exceeding an inch diarterer. Tlje
bark being feraped ficiii the flicks, rrjd
dried and powdered, is, hlio -mixed by
the Indians with their tcbacco, snd s
held by them in the higheft elurraticjri
for their winter ffnoaking. A-ivred. that
grows near the great lakes, in reeky pla
ces, they ufe in tlie Airrmer j feafen. It
is called by the Indiars Scgctkirrac, rrd
cr eeps like a vine on the gr curd, U me
tires extending fo eight cr ten feet, anil
Bearing a leaf about the fizc cf a filver
penny, nearly round ; it is of the fuhU
fiance and colour of the laiirel. r,d i?,
like the tree it referable?,, sri eyerprceri.
Thefe leaves, dried and powdered ibey
likewife mix with their tobacco ; and, ab
faid befare, fmcak it enly durirg the
fbmmer. By thefe three futcealaneums
the pipes of the Indians are vrell far plicel
through every iafon cf the year ; and,
as they are great fmoakers, they arc veiir
careftal in properly gajdjeriiJg and pre
paring them. J ; I .
On the 20th of September Ilcft the
iMGreen Bay, anq; proceeded up Fox Rl
Ver, Mill in .ccnipariy with fhe traderi
and feme Indians. On the 35th T arf
I rived at the great town f the Winaej
bagoes. fituaied oin a fmall iflknd, juft as
ycu enter the ea ft; End of Lake "Winnei
bago. Here the queen, who prefided
over this tribe intead of a Sachew, re
! ceivedmewith great civility, and enter
tained me in a very diftingiiifiied man
ner, during the four days I continue
wim her.
The day after my arrival I held a
council vvtth the chiefs, of vhc m I-sfked
permiffion to pafs through their country,"
in my way to more remote nations, on
bufinefs of importance. " Tljis was readi-f
ly granted me, the requefl being eficcm
ci by them as a reat compliment paid
to their tribe. The queen fat in 1I12
council, but only afked a few que fiicri
or gave feme trifling directions in mat
ters relative to the fiate ;. for womcq
are never allowed to fit in their councils
except tkey happen to be invefied with
the frpreme authority, and tacn it is noj
cuOomary fpr them to make anyifrfmal
fpeeches, as the chicA. dp. She was a
very ancient wo rnjinlmail jin ftature
and aot muchcfiflingui&ed by her dre&f
    

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