North Carolina Newspapers

    (VOL. I.)
T HE
(NUMB. 24.)
AND
E R A L
D VER-TISER.
«*■
W ^ D N E S D A - y, Aijjust 13, 1788.
Foreign Intelligence^
■
LONDON, May 20.
Revolution in the Frcncli Government^
and
Rebellion in France.
T he confe^uencc of the K.ing’s orders oi the 8th indaitf.
Bed of ^ujlice^ held at VerTailleS) is a Rektl^^'
Ikn in I'onie dt the provinces. In former papers, dffp
liuve related the lirong refolutions and prctelts of the
par’iamcntof Vhouloufe.
"i he Comte de Perigor^, of one of the'flrft families in France,
and V. .0 commaii^ diere, has been expelled the city on epdea-
vouiiu" to sntorc^ the King's commands, and the gates of the
town were kept (hot againft him. Two r^ments quartered
thereunder hi* command, .ire likewife withdrawn from thegar>
rTon, as the commandant did not cheofe to expofe them, know
ing that fo fmall a forceVould be totally infuAcienU He has
written to Court de firing a reintbreement of 10,000 men, with-
out w'.iicii, it was his opinion, that nothing could be efife^ed.
in Eritany, a great part of the province is in a^ual rebelli
on. 'i'he Commandant ..t Rennes, had oidered the regiment of
ticr.ij'.fe to march, but they refufed, and laid down theufiWms.
He ha* liktwife dirpatohc^l^o couriers to Verfailles, faring,
ffomthe ftateof the provfbce, that one might raifearry, defiring
sr. 'niniediate fupply of troops.
Un the izih and i3^h inflant, a large body of troops, both
hcri'e and toot, vi'ith a prodigious number of general'and otlier
cflicers, were met marching in gre.it hafte from Paris towaids
Bourdeaux. i he road was covered with carriages of every def-
C!>}.t.un, and appeared a feene of much confuhun.
i l:e King’s orders of the Sth, were to be put in feree the 15th
ir.ft^pt: and it is imagined they will be refiffed in the fame man*
*’ . .1.-
In V-ris, ti.c people ire more quiet { but it is only hecaole of
theiuge kody ot troops in its vicinity. They have been dif-
pcnccl with much circumfpeftion in every quarter of the town,
turicarct any tumult-
At V crfaillcs, where the King is, the palace Is furrounded bjr
adouole fentryof guaidi, and forae additional reglmentr^i^
fulled ill the neighbourhood.
Jieiidcs the refoluiion of the Parliament of Paris, not to ac
cept ui any feat in the CDur PleKierif thz grande ebafubre of Par-
li.uisntand feveral Pens have refufed giving their afliftance at
it i and they have declared turther, that no power (hall oblige
t! uiii toiL, as tlie exiltencc of the Court is a violation of their
pr;41-ges.
riis iviajefty was to declare his farther intentiona laft Tliurf-
day.
By the nuils which arrived on Mdj^^^ftplng, we find,
that the AuilrLnsluive received a mdre t.han
c.. unterhalance tlieit fuccefs at The Turks
hi"e raife l the fiegc of Dubi^ defca1||Hp|^^ps under the
ct.m.mano of Prince Charles of Litchu»m»n, and deftroyed all
his batteries. The atl on lafteu for mere than three hours in
thei'pen field. 'Ihe Turks dto this occafion, dilplayed the mofl
ferocious vahiur. This adlion happened on the Z5th oL April,
tiic day after-■ chabat* fu* rendered. ^
ic i3 a fin 'uiar faa, that at |{iis moment, every power in
lurcpe has 3 fleet either at fea, or preparing, or ready to take to
fea upen tlie thorieil notice.
1 hey writs from Bour*'eaux, that when the meffengcr arrived
a: -, ar piace, with the edid from the King of France, an-
r, i rcing his will relpeAing the Parliament, the citizens, who
we c apprifsd of his errand, threw him over the walls of the
tew: , and, in the vehemence of their patriotic rage, were pro
ceeding to flonehim te death. Tbemilita^ were ordared to
ii. etpofe, but they rem;fincd quite neutraipP'and it was only
tn.oufji tlic influence of returning pity that the man was per-
m.tieci .0 efcape to recount the tfi^vourable reception that at*
tv-ndco him.
* he Pu; liament of Paris is now Uo more. Thurfday laft was
thu day appointed for the king to hold his bed ofjufticc. Early
W tnc .normug every avenue to the houfe of Parliament was
fun -u ided by the military—!,« Cbambre Ajjimbieeu A captain
or thez^ing s guards entered, and arreftedtwo of the members
'' ho had fpoker. too freely on former occafions } and his Majef-
ty oirtcr.d ttie Parliament to be cajfee^ or annibllatedK for ever,
and the doors of the hbtafe to be ilmt. T
Inftrutfions have been tranfmitted to the Governors and Inten-
>ants ot the different Provinces in France* with authority to^bro-
gatt all the Provincial Parliaments. Military forces arc already
n-tioned in different diftrids, to «nfor^ obedience to the King’s
diouid reira&oriAefs appi^r* '
from the MASSACHUSETTS CENTINEL, of July a, |f88.
SHIP-NEWS—
fk RRI^^D fafe In port, the (hip Fedzr al Constitwti-
Mrvh Commander, from Elylium. In her
pafl«n|ers, Flour'^ing Commerce, formerly a refident in
thefe dates—MefTrs. Paj^c Faith, Cej/^^nti, and yuJliee—Gem-
rai IhJitaaeuo^ and National *Tbb1atter, we are told, is
i iiTtrtnrr'Tis tn-j.i- . /^
to deliver up to
'vRff a idtmrn'Tis TO Ooi
^ United Sates, tl« PoA on the VOKn frontiers, with Jlieir
"IWta to akc Ari mea.
o"-'' •" 'iSrfurrendet. -bn’the
rival of|brfe lUuftnous charaam We felicitate our readers—the
mws pMjcu!arly,«Je^ntcnilrcfiding in our dear -coun*!?
try.” The canto of this \
oOf thefe is oonflgned
cordially accepted.
the Oid Werld. There were no paflengers on board, js &e is
^own to be a s.«a.veflVI. and fufpedfed to be rottcMfo much
jo, that the o^ers could not procure infuiance. She had oh
^ard rundii7 bales of Englijb colourt, worn out by flying in our
harbour,- while onrfiriptt arc not fuffeicd to unfurl, oi‘ our Jlart
rwi^e in the Bntim ports^packagei of paper moncy-^inc
barrw and tender afts—local prejudices, jeaioufics, jflid f^s
of sifccrd.
'The(loop Anarchyare told. Is aftiore on the ef'
Ur.un^ and cannot be^pt off j the crew has periflied, and the
owners havCdbroke. r »
C?C3J«3£»tCa>«3 •
In CONGRESS,
JULY 3, lygg.
W HEREAS tpplleation has h.vn lately made to Congrefs,
by theiegiflature of Virginia and thediftiWf of Kew*
tucky, tor the admiflion of the faid diflri^l into the Federal Unu
on, as a feparate niember thereof, the terms contained in the
refolutiens of the faid
diftrlft, relative to the premifcs. . ind whereas Congr^s hav
ing fully confidered the fubjeft, did. on the third day' of Tune
lafl, rcfolve, that it is expedient t^ ihe faid dj(tri£l l>e cr©6ted
IkI’c and fep .rate member of
the Federal Union j and agj^inted a committee to report an aft
accor^ngly, which comrnmee, en the fecond inftant was *dif.
charg«^, ,t appearing that iiineftaics had adopted the Conftitu-
to'the Conven^on.
ot the people. And whereas a new confederacy is formed
among the ratifying ftates, and there is reafon to believe that
the ftate of Virpnia, including the faid dirtrift, did, on the
twenty.fifth of Junelaft, become a mwnber of the faid confr-
d^cy ; And whereas an aft of Congrefs in the prefent ftate of
government of the country, fevering a part »of the faid ftate
from the othw parts thereof, and admiring it into the eonfedc-
racy, formed by the articles of confederation and purpetual uni
on, a$ anindcpcndcnt|metnbcrthcre^ may beJittLlcd with
^**1!*® ^ e™ to make the
faid diftrift a feparate member of the Federal Union, formed by
the adoption of the faid Conftitution j and therefore it muft K
manifcftly improper for Congrefs affemblcd, under the faid arti
cles of confederation, to adopt any other mcafui«s relative to the
prwifes, th^ thofc which exprefs their fenfe, that the faid dif-
tnft ouglu to be an independent member of the Union, as foon
M circuimtances (hall permit proper meafures to be adopted for
that parpofe.
RpOLVED, That a copy of the proceedings of Congrefs,
relative to the ^independency of the diftria of Kentucky, he
tranfmittt^ tothe L^iflature of Virginia, and aifo to Samuti
M‘DowcU, £fq. jate Prclidcnt ef the faid. Convention ; and
that t^ fa^ Legiflature and theinhabitantsdif the diftria afore-
faid, be informed, that as the ccAfticution of theWnited States
IS now ratified, Congrefs think it utiadvifcable to adopt any
further meafures for admittingThe diftria of Kentucky into the
Federal Union, as an independent member thwaf, under the
article of confederation and perpetual union j but that Con-
^fs thinijjng it expedient that the f-iid diftria be made a fepa-
fia* and member of the Union, as foon after proedWings (hall
corammence under rhe (aid Conftitution as circumftances (hail
permit, racommend R to the fa^ Legiflature and the inhalfitants
of the laiu diftria, wto alter meir aas and refolutions relative
to the premif^, as to render jy^em conformable to the proviflons
made in the (aid Cpnftitutioi^ to the end that no impediment
may be in the way dl t^e fpcedy accomplilhment of this impor
tant bufinefs. . .
■ 0:^;ArLES THOMPSON* Secretary.
(A c^y) r
Atteft. Samvxl Colsmam, A. C. C...
K. I C H M O N D, (Virginia )
AMERICAN JV||NUFACTURe1
O T^T O N.
afford tbc.utmoft plcalurc
JO every goc^ citizen, to be inform-
ed that |he coftoo manufactory lately
f^n-^Kitdiy 11^ this city is in a very
Mourifhing conation. Many of our
patriotic, citizens are cloathing them-
felves with the jeans made by it.
^ In the courle of a few years, the
!»different1warcs made from cotton may
t^ply the ule of woollens, which,
from the infancy of our country, and
the prefent ftate of its cultivation, can
not be procured in a fulBcient quanti-
ty ttfeclothc all our inhabitants. Cot
ton enough may be raifed in -the
(cufticrn ftates, to clothe not only
every citizen in America, but half the
inhabitants of Earbpe. It is much to
be wilhed that machines for carding
and (pinning cotton, limilar to thole
now ^at woik in Philadelphia, were
•eftablilhed in all our country towns
and village*. Germantown, in par
ticular, (hould take the lead in this
hulinefs. That town has been famous
for the manufaduring of faddles,
ftockings, and carriages.—It will be
ncr own fault, if (lie is not celebrated
as much as formerly for her (kill and
fuccels in the manufa^fory of jeans,
fuftians, velvets, velvercts, corduroys!
and even mullins.
SUN-FLOWER OIL.
* It appears from experiment, made
forqierly in this ftate, that a bulhel of
fun-flower feeds yields a gallon of oil.
and that an acre of ground planted
with the feed, at three feet apart, will
yield between forty and fifty buihels
of the^feed. This oil is as mild as
fweet oil, and is equally agreeable with
it in (allads, and as a medicine. It
.may moreover be ufed to advantage in
paints, varnifhes and ointments. From
its being manufaflitred in our country
it may always be procured and ufed
m afrelh (fate.—The oil is prefled
from the feed in the fame manner as
cold drawn linfeed oil is obtained
from flaxleed, and with as little trou
ble.—Sweet olive oil fells for fix (hil
lings a quart. Should the" oil of the
fun-flower fell for only two thirds of
that price, the produft of an ’acre of
ground, fuppofing it to yield only forty
bulhels of the feed, will be^. 32, a
fum far bCTond the produa: of an
acre of ground in any kind of grain.
The feed is raifed with little trouble,
and grows in lands of moderate ferti-
fity. It may be gathered and (helled,
fit for the extraflion of the oil, by
women and children, ^
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view