North Carolina Newspapers

    Mimster Buys First Set Of Goodrich
Oil and Soap Tires Sold In Charlotte
tional jHilpit orator ami Irctiirfr.
A-'**rding to hi: rhunh and rc-
Odfd!, h»’ it- ill Iin«“'for tlip Dix-lor
of l>ivinitv
CHARI>OTTF — Rev. Paul
Davis of St. Mark street^ leadin^r
Pr«"i^iyterian ministers of Char
lotte wa* the first to buy a wt of
Ooodrieh Tires made with Amer-
pol America* Liberty Ruhbe.% an
artif*ial ruhl>er made from Oil
and Soap, to be used as an emer
pewy defense measure in ea.se the
niWjr supply should be rut off.
It may be stated that R>v. Daviis
!« a irradnate of Johnson C.
Smith University school of Liberal
Art* and from the frraduat> school
of Theologj-. Rev. Davis, is now
Moderator of the Catawiia Pres
bytery and receive* the recogni
tion and cooperation from hi» co
workers. In the course of his nine
year* of ministrj’ he has orsraniz-
ed and built two churches and has
completed two major repair jobs.
R^v. Davis has traveled exten
sively and ifi considered an excep
acquired at your T''niversity is'charf?p of personnel, at a eonfer-
])erfect.” enee held recently in Judge
“I mifjht best illuntrate his ac- Patterson’* ^office. The NMA will
eurax'y ir» the lumber also be called i*pon to furnish the
neef«ary, when I tell you that nnines of, civilian Ne^ro doctors
when the job was pompli*tod there Tor army service when ^those in
was only one (1) lK)ard left over, the reserve corps arq a#ipned. '
“I will be i)leased to show you[ This was the outfjrowth of an
this room an.vtinie you are in earlier conference held October
Washinffton.” |io. Ren. Arthur Capper of Kansas
“In closinjr I would say that aided the NMA fjroflp in jfettinpf
my twenty years experience in it* prop’am accepted and person-
prietors in the central states ex- tion that never reads the fanciful .real estate, I doubt if I have ever ally conducted them to Patterson’s
poets '41 to be a banner year in success stories of Horatio Al^er.Iseen a neater or better job than'ofllce where he recommended the
their line. The boys claim to But David is today at the climax this.” *aM*e«)tance of their requests,
have penciled table cloths to g personal story that would Back in school, David Byrd had Judfje William Hastie, civilian
prove it. have left jfood old Horatio gnisping almost forgotten his holiday work aide to the secretary of war,
is comiwseci i adventure when an unexpected },elped work out details.
The handsome young lad from letter arrived. “Will yon,” ai«kedj It was brought out that the
Hampton Sophomore
Outdoes Horatio |
Alger In Real Life
i • • • j
i HAMPTON Institute, Va. —'
David Hyrd, a -ophoniore student
^ Portland (Oregon) Oregonian: in carpentry a tHamoton Institute,
An association of laundry pro- Ih of the reaJistir younger gcnera-
of a billion
who think they are more im-^Vashington,-D.
portant than the human race. j’|,ristmas, just another hard workjmore renimleling jobs during your right of Negro medical officers in
iing youngster in the Hampton Tn-^sunvmer holiday and would you be!all Negro refriments, national
stitute trade uchool. Studying,|willing to let me finance you injguard units and units of the regu-
working, capably preparing him- opening a contractini? firm in ]ar army officered by white*,
self for the day when he would Washington upon graduation?” There are only 65 colored reserve
David is busy working at plans' physicians available and sinc« the
OT so individual.4
Dr. Rudolph Winstoo
Named C. & S. B.&T.
Co. Director
C. was until, his former employer, “accept seven war department conceded* tho
A nation, like a perdson must
be willing t© stand or fail up-
ofjgvital principals.
A nation, like a person, must
be willing to stand or fall upon
vital principles.
You can say one thing for F,
D. R., he is a glutton for ac
cepting responsibity.
to go job hunting. Rut the applica
tion of some of his Ham.pton learn jfor the business he’s step into in plan eventually called for 300, the
ing during the holidays has as-^another year, and Horatio Alger>emaining 235 would be furnished
sured nim of a business and a ig again a best-seller on the by the NMA.
'arfer upon graduation! Hampton campus.
Stninbliijg upon an opportunity
to bid on a job to rebuild a base-
^ ^ ^ ^ Tnenfc -into a recreation room for
„ . , , - . , one of Washington's outstanding
Gratitude is a fruit of great
cultivdtion; you do not find it g^, ^g]| that he contract was
Sweet is the breath of vernal his. Summoning several friends
from the Hampton trade school,
The practice of pacing all Ne-
David Pender Stores
and
Big Star Super lHarkets
BREVARD ST. BARBER SHOP
 Shower Baths... 15c
N. G. EDWARDS, Prop.
231 South Brevard SU Charlotte, N. G.
Philadelphia, — Dr. Rudolph
I
they went to work.
But this letter to Wilfred E.
Carter from the realtor tells its
own story;
“I am taking the liberty of
writing to you albout a young man
jby the name of David Byrd.
I “The intelligence used by him
in submitting a bid to rebuild my
Army Agrees To
Ha^Negro;
Physicians
Await First CaU*; Will Use
Them in Regiments, Station
Hospitals, Induction Centers;
NMA To Sapply. Civilian
Medics
WASHINGTON,— (A N P)
gro eases in one wing of an in- Winston, prominent physician, was
istitntion without re^yard to the na- elected a director of the Citizens'
ture of their diseases was discuss and Southern Bank and Trust
ed and it was agreed that placing company at the annual stockhold-
infec1;ious cases with others was ers’ meeting held Tuesday,
unfair and in the future would bej A native of Hampton, Va., he
discontinued. 'eame to Philadelphia at an early
As regards discrimination a- age, attended grammar school and
gainst Negro in private industries Central High school. He received
holding national defense con- a fouir year scholarship to the
tracts, Judge Patterson said the University of Pennsylvania nd
war department itself did not later won in a competitive ex-
discriminate Ifiit difficulties were amination a scholarship through
encountered because of the em- amination a scholarship through
ployers themselves mainly through the medical school of the niver-
the anti-Negro attiude of labor gity. He interned at City hospital
unions. Under the present law the nnraber two in St. Louis and,has
2nd St. Barber Shop
HAIRCUTS 25c
SHAVES 15c
500 East Second Sti^t ', R. R. Reeder, Prop.
H basement, encouraged me to hire Negro d^tors a (lannrt- department oould not a»Pecifi- jo^e graduate work at Harvard
a recreation reserve forces ot tlie war oepari ^ , s ...
ihim to construct « , i. •n.:„
'room in my home. I must admit ment hire Negro
,di-
callv ask
d lU UUvy nai.*****
that when his oi?er proved to be the next €0 hospitals and secretary said, but expressed a | jjj. "Kinston is a member of the
entual willingness to study
SCHOOL - RINGS, KEYS,
FRATERNITY - JEWELRY
GRADUATING - NURSES - PINS
—Write—
H. FLOYD-HORNE
108 E. First Street
Charlotte, N. C.
priv-ate employers to Medical school in internal
labor, the assistant .jjj.
$750.00 less than the lowest of regiments, •
three bids, I was reluctant to be- induction centers in further.
lieve he knew what he was doing, portion of colored ^ j _
I can now honestly say that this ratio of one ^n eac^^ ^mong gross people.—Dr. John- Laundry, Inc. He
,son.
the Pi'oWem Mercy hospital
"■'.and is eaipecially interested in
*gestroenterlogy. He js also a direc
job has far exceeded my fondest tors throughout the nat.on,
hopes, and it only nroves that the will finaLy total over ' | shower,
training and background he has These promises were made to a collected treasures
; special committee representing the ^ sweet.
National Medical associatioa by^ Sweet music's melting fall, but
Judge Patterson, assistant secre- sweeter yet
tary of war and Gen. Willivn.The still small voice of
Shedd, assistant jhief of staff in gratitude. —Gray.
DR. AUBREY L. PALMER
Eyes Examined Glasses Fitted
We maintain a completely equipped
office for the exclusive convenience
of the Colored People.
Tel. 3- 8500
(Om>osite Public Lilnrary) 317-A N. Tryon St.
Bargain Corner...
5th and Poplar Sts.
’40-01ds 6 Coach, Heater
'40-Pontiac, 6 Sedan,-Heater
’40-Ford Del., Tudor
Radio, Heater
’39-Ford Del, Tudor,
’39-Ford Std. Tudor-
’39-Nash 6 Tudor, Over
drive and Heater™
’39-Pontiac “6” Tudor
*36-Nash “6” Tudor, Over
drive and Heater..
36’-Ford Del. Tudor
’35-Studebaker Sedan
’31-Ford Roadster....
’31-Dodge Sedan
'29-Ford Coupe
MACK SANDERS
USE^ CAR DEPT.
Ptione 3-0032
$72500
$09500
$59500
$49500
$47500
$55000
$54500
$24500
$22500
$19500
$ 7500
$ 3500
I 3500
You Can Always
Find the Car You
Waat at Prices
You Can Afford
Here
145
195
*265
*265
*345
*625
*665
*495
To Pay
33 Ford
Tudor
35 Plymouth
Sedan
36 Chevrolet
Coach
36 Plymouth
Sedan
36 Chrysler
Sedan
39 Chrysler
Sedan
40 Chevrolet
Sedan
39 Plymouth
Coach
37 Ford $
Tudor
38 Pontiac
Sedan
Many Others $40 Up
HOPPE MOTORS
4th at Graham • Dial 3-1692
295
Davidson Brothers
Funeral Home
901 S. Mint St
Phone 3-2336
Recent Trade - Ins
• •
I 1940 Model 45 Harley- |
I Davidson Motorcycle |
'595
1940 Chev. Master
Town Sedan
1940 Ford
Tudor
J938 Buick Special 2-Door
touring sedan, ra-
dio, heater OOO
1939 Chevrolet $4 Qg
Coach
1939 Willys $yj OpT
Sedan
1938 Ford Deluxe Coupe . .
Radio, Extra $4 OP
Clean
1937 Oldsmobile 6 touring se
dan. Radio, heater, white
sidewall tires, $
spotlight —
1936 Ford
tudor touring—
GATHINGS
MOTOR CO.
WILLYS DISTRIBUTOR
519 S. Tryon - - Dial 2-0173
'385
'295
10% DISCOUNT
ON STRAIGHT SALES THRU FEB.
15.1941--ON THE FOLLOWING...
38 Pontiac 4-door Touring
Sedan, Clean as $/t OCT
new-equipped
38 Olds. “8” 4-door T. Sedan
Clean, A Real $CTOCr
Buy
38 Packard 120 T. Sedan—
Brand new mptor.
Radio, etc, only OmO
40 Plymouth 2 - Door Tour
Sedan—22,000 miles,
Clean and
‘.Varranted Ot/O
37 Dodge 4 - Door T.
*365
38 DeSota 4 - Door %A 17 fT
T. Sedan ^ • O
37 Pontiac 2-door $
T. Sedan
425
37 Packard 120 T.
Sedan O I U
34 Hudson Sedan— $‘
Ok'd
145
U will find 30 other choice cars on ow
Lot... See E’m!
Wfe hav^found some excellent cus
tomers among our Colored friends, and
will be glad to demonstrate any Car ...
If you have 9-n old c ar, our allowances
will be generous. Come in!
THOMAS CADILLAC - OLDS., Inc.
♦
“A Safe Place To Buy”
500 W. Trade St. Dial 3-1614
married Miss Wilhemina Adams,
and has one son, Rudolph Wins
ton, Jr.
Aocording to reports made by
the secretary aftd treasurer, the
net profits flrom 1939 were $30,
853.3, and for the year 1940,
133,870.31. The assets increased
from $729,259.99 to $829,178.99
for 1940.
Tar Heel Farmers
To Sell Produce At
Fort Bragg Market
Governor J. M. Broughton
said Friday the council of state |
had agreed to the use of “what-,
ever amount is necessary from]
the state's contingency and
emergency fund for establish
ment of central marketing ma
chinery for the sale of local j
farm produce to the artillery
post at Ft. Bragg.
At the same time the state
department of agriculture took:
further steps in its e^orts to ar
range a market at Bragg for
produce grovm^Tn the state.
George Ross, marketing spe
cialist of the department, con
tinued conferences with offi
cers at the post in an effort to
determine what marketing ma
chinery will be necessary to as
sure an adequate farm food
supply tq the post. |
The governor said the cost of
necessary machinery was not
expected to be large.
Randal B. Etheridge, markets
division chief, said he and Ross
were making all efforts to de-
be met, in the sale of produce to
the army, j
The department will attempt
to “assure orderly marketing"
with the view to eliminating
risk on the part of the farmer
in the preparation of commodi
ties which must conform with
army regulations.
There are 70,000 men at Ft.
Bragg.
A satisfactory arrangement
for the sale of farm goods
would be “like manna from
heaven" to the Tar Heel farm
ers, the governor said.
Regardless of how the War
in Europe ends, the sturdy de
fense of England has given the
United States time to prepare
for its own defense.
Th^re is no um .to worry
about the powers of the Presi
dent to begin a war. Every
president of teh United States
had had ample power to begin
warfare.
ALEXANDER
FUNERAL HOME
323 SOUTH BREVARD STREET
Day Phone 8431 Night Phones 3-6027, 3-2472
WINE and DINE at
ARCHIE’S BAR and GRILL
601 E. First Street
Specialities in Breakfasts
Lunches, Dinners
Imported and Domestic Wines
} Pints, 15c—Pints,-25c—Quarts, 45c
$3.00 Meal Tickets For $2.50
ELECTRIC RANGES
Hotpoint’s Lowest Brices^ Greatest f^lues in 31 Years
^ lit.
; ' * t
TNK Tiffany FEATURES
THtmy
C«P9inlad S'PlM* uttntf
Ml InefuM withttiU riAf»
• S N«w HI-8pMd,
Calrod Surfacs
Units, Moh with 8
MMtHrMi HMt*.
• All-Porceiain
«Min«l insid*
■ndout.
• Twin VMwtia-Ut*
Lamps.
• N«w IliuniliMtad
Switch Dials.
• Built-Ill El«ctrie
Ov«n Tlmw-Clock
• Ovsrslza, AH-Pur-
PM«, navw-SMl
Ov«a.
• Bidlt^liiTIni*
Chime.
• New Calrod Bak
ing Unit with HMt
D«fl«cter.
• N«w Duo-Speed
Broiler.
• Warming Com-
partmmt.
• Naw 7-Quart
Flavor-Seal Tlirfft
Coekar with 5^
Haat Calrod UnK.
/
Now Century FEATURES
o3 improvad Ni-Spaad Cal
rod Surface Uni^ each
with S Measured Heats.
0 New 5-Heet Thrift Ceeker
wttb Flavor-Seal Ud.
a New All-Purpose Flavor-
Seal Oven. «
a New Calrod Bakhig Unit
with Haatfleflector.
e New Rac*;ant Broiler Unft.
a Ail-Porcelain enamel
inside and out
0 New Indicating Switch
Buttons,
eCLEAN
as
electric
RghL
New low prices and attractive terms
bring this year’s superb ranges with-
y/y in mean* of more families than
ever before!
POWER COMPANY
    

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