North Carolina Newspapers

    SEPT. 20, 1941
THE CAk MN^ TIMES
PJuOf TBBtt
Welcome N. C. College
RECORD ENROLLMENT
EXPECTED AT LOCAL
COLLEGE THIS YEAR
Durham, Sept. 10.—The larg
est enrollment in the history of
North Carolina Collefife foi Ne*
irroes was expected here next
week when the local institution
opens its doors for the 19J1-42
session. According to advanced
reports more applications for the
entrance of Freshmen are in the
registrars office than ever be
fore and college officials were
being put to a task to find hous
ing space for those desiring en
trance.
A weJl planned program for
the Freshmen class has been set
*nd new students will find a
hearty welcome awaiting them
from both faculty members and
student body. Feshmen week
will begin on Wednesday, Sep
tember 17th with two days being
alolted for their registration.
Friday, Sept. 19 has been set
aside as registration day for ad
vanced students.
Last year’s enrollment at the
college showed a student body
of approximately 800, and it is
expected to reach near the one-
thqusand mark this year.
During the school tQrm last
year college officias found it
necessary to serve six meals a
day, the dining room which was
built only a few years ago to
accommodate around 300 being
too small to serve all the board
ing students at one tin^e. This
year the dinning room has been
enlarged to almost three times
its origina size, and will be able
toke care of any anticipated
growth of the college for the
next several years to come—it is
hoped.
Added to courses already es
tablished at the North Carolina
College is a library science de
partment which will offer a de
gree in that fidd. Many stu
dents are expected to avail
themselves of the opportunity
of this course.
THE HERITAGE
OF HISTORY
By Dr. Charles Stelzle
Historians are familiar with
what happened thousands of
years ago. They know that even
at that time there was almost a
complete framework for all our
present-day experiments in poli
tics, conomics, literature, drama
and government.
But the average man of today
has an idea that the ancients
were simply “a bunch of hea
then”, ignora,nt and depraved,
unmindful of the fact ‘hat how
ever limited they may have been
in some respects, without the use
and enjoyment of the telephone.
the radio, the motion picture,
the automobile and Ihe airplane,
they were really very similar to
ourselves.
“History repeats itself” only in
the application or the results of
certain fundamental principles
of human behavior. It does not
mean that the world is going on
like the endless swinging of a
pendulum, getting nowhere in
l>artieular. The whole charactfr
and life of the people as a whole
have gone steadily upward,
whatever may have been tlie out-
Avard form of culture and man
ner of living. What is of great
est interest and value today is
not so much the actions of par
ticular individuals in history, as
it is the movement and trends of
the people as a whole, as hu
manity kept marching on.
Just what historians 5,000
year hence will think of our pre
sent civilization, no man can tell.
It would probably be a confus
ing picture if they should deal
exclusively with what many of
us regard as the most important
events of the day. Some of our
leaders in journalism, politics
and industry are saying that the
second world war will be “the
end of civilization”. There have
been many such ‘ ‘ ends ’ ’, but the
world has gone on, because be
neath these “catastrophes”
there has been a basis for pro
gress which could not be halted.
On the whole. Democracy has
steadily made prgress—in reli
gion, in education, in industry,
in politics, in class distinctions,
in the democracy of sexes. These
were all part of the same move
ment. History has simply been
repeating itself. In every case
the people have won, although
the progress of Democracy must
CAMPUS SCENES AT NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE
»■ •«»
Three New Men
Added To N. C.
Law Faculty
Acconling to advancetl infor
mation the incoming law class
at the North Carolina College
for this year will exceed m num
bers by far that of last year
which was the first since the
establishment of the law school
two years ago.
I I
I I
j Added to the law faculty this i
I year are three new members all
! Negroes. They are as follows: j
, James Young Carter, A. B., A. 1
; M., LL. B.: Charles W. Qvyck,
!a. B., LL. B., Albert L. Tur-
A. B., A. M., LL . B.
tor. Interment was at the For*
eat cemetery of that city.
Faith it is recorded, nunrc*
mountains but mountains, it is
reported, have been known tO
reported, have been known to
move faith.
ner.
The above campus sccnes at
North Carolina College shows
several of the beautiful build
ings at the Durham institution. |
It includes the adminstration |
buildings at the left, the dining !
hall and one of the teachers cot
tages.
WELCOME
Students and Faculty
N. C. Colllge
FEDERAL INCOME TAXES
STATE INCOME TAXES
INSURANCE PREMIUMS
MORTGAGE PAYMENtS
have to be PAIDl
You will find it very convenierLt to pay them in
one lump sum. You can do this and get any ad
ditional funds you may require by selecting the
type of credit that suits you and budgeting^ the
repayment to the bank over a period of ten
months or a year, fitted to your income. ^
Mechanics & Fanners
Durham, N. C. Bank ' Raleigh, N. C.
C. C. Spauldinff, Pres. R. L. McDougald, Exec. V. P.
J. H. Wheeler, Cashier
Gov. Stassen Denies
Discriminating
Against Negroes
i Minneapolis, Minn., — White
and Negro citizens of the twin
cities rubbed elbows at a mass
meeting sponsored by the Min-
be judged by a long-time view—
not by what happened yesterday
or today. It may well be that
some future civilization may
learn from our follies and our
mistakes—^and our successe.s, too.
nesota Negro Defense committee
recently, in the Hallie Q. B/own
Community house, to hear Gov.
Harold E. Stassen defend him
self against charges of discrim
inating against Negroes in Min
nesota Home Defense force.
Rev. Clarence T. R. Nelson,
pastor of the Camphor Memorial
Methodist church and publicity
chairman of the defense com
mittee, gave a brief review ot
the committtee’s fight to have
Negroes enlisted in Minnesota’s
home defense program. Follow
ing this, Frank L. Alsup, chair
man of the committee, *in his
inttoductory remarks, told^^tfre
governor that the people would
not be interested in his speech i
if it were on any other subject ^
than that which they had gath-1
ered together to hear. '
Gov. Stassen’s address for the
most part was given over to the
ctiing of instances to show that
he is not and never has been
prejudiced nor ever done any
thing in his public career that
could be labeled discriminatory
to the Negro.
In answer to the governor’s
statement that he would work
with the committee to make a
test case of the discriminatory
army code, Cecil Newman, edi-
or and publisher of the St. Paul
Recorder and Siwkesman in Min
neapolis, challenged the govern
or to strike the first blow in the
fight by the issuance of an or
der to the effect that Negroes
be inculcated in Minnesota’s
home defense, to which the gov
ernor replied that fTe could not
do that.
HOUSES FOR
RENT
No. ROOMS ADDRESS
WEEKLY RATE
3
3 Adams Court
$3.50
3
1302 Alston Avenue
2.00
3
423 Cozart Avenue
3.00
Store 616 Fayetteville Street
4.00
2 Apt. 1010 Fayetteville Street
15. (M)
3
1011 Ferrell Street
3.50
2
604 Guys Alley
2.25
3
306 Hunt Street
3.50
Store 528 Proctor Street
6.50
2
606 Ramsey Alley
2.50
3
516 Ramsey Street
3.50
2
610 Ramsey Alley
2.50
2
612 Ramsey Alley
2.50
3
512 Ramsey Street
2.25
4
414 Roney Street
c
3.00
3
406 Roney Street
3.00
3
—407 Roney Street
3.00
3
408 Roney Street
3.00
3
410 Roney Street
3.00
4
416 Roney Street
3.00
3
404 Roney Street
3.00
2
704 South Street
2.50
3
307 Sowell Street
2.50
2
703 Whitted Street -
2.50
3
724 Whitted Street i
3.50
4
315 Lee Street
' 4.00
3
408 Lee Street
3.50
3
603 Mebane Street
3.50
5
507 Mobile Avenue
5.50
- 4
526 W Pettigrew Street
4.50
5
432 Piedmont Street
6,00
2
106 Piedmont Street
2.25
5
522 Proctor Street
5.50
UNION INSURANCE*
REALTY CO.
REAL ESTATE~.RENTING~.INSURANCE
REPAIRS AND BUILDING SUPPLIES
Nl
WELCOME STUDENTS &
FACULTY . . .
• Books
• Gift Shop
• Office Supplies
-i ■ ' ^
• Corona Portable Typewriters «
• Eastman Kodaks
• School Supplies
Thomas Book Store
>»r. Corcoran and Chapel Hill Sts. — Phone J-2331
Archie B. Brown, proprietor
of the Big Four Shoe Shop has
recently returned from attend
ing the funeral of his brother,
William Brown.
^'uneral services for the de
ceased were held at the Mt.
Zion Baptist church of which
the Rev. Elijah Benton is pas-
^FASHIMHIfVIEW^
For the ImK tkmt
its fetminimHy,
HtHuekmeping
mem’* en#»; Byrmm»e trfTT—. TM
pictured drew it **
with mm emMT tkirt,
It jo//, Uomted sfcL'tewie*
I r/v»mv nocief- $39^
WELCOME
Students & Faculty
NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE
When problems get
knotty...pause and
Toke a minute to relax, and
things go amoother. Ice-cold
Coca-Cola adds refreshment to
relaxation. Its delightful,whole
some taste has the charm of pur-
J
Ity. So when you pause through
out the day, make It th»pamm that
reliresfces with ke-cold Coca-Cola.
YOU TASTE ITS ilMUlY
DURHAM COCA-COU BOmiNG CO.
W. K. RAND. Mer.
    

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