North Carolina Newspapers

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THE CAROLINA TIMES
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1941
SPORTING WORLD
N. C. COLLEGE BEST S. C. STATE 19 - 0
NEfiROES HOLDING
OWN ON BIG WHITE
FOOTBALL TEAMS
MORTOWEBTERN SHIFTS
£ND TO HALfRACK
rOTENTlAL STAR IS
mEUGIBLE;
EVAXS(^’, IU„ —(ANP)
Pit the first time^in ser’eral
years Northwestern university
> will have iiln colored regular on
v|its football team. However, on
the sqtiad this year at the ritjht
j halfback post is Charles Warren
I a 180 pound junior who last
was a substitute end. He is
-expected to see considerable ac-
^"tion at the spot where Bernie
Jefferaon starred for three years.
Another candidate who wa.s ex
pected to set the conference a-
lire this yeiar, Danny Williams,
left halfback, has been declared
ineligible because of scholastic
deficiences. Williams proved so
senational &s a freshman that
I Coach Lynn Waldorf refused to
I use him as a sophomore in 1940
I because of a galaxy of other
Kyirc preferring to wait until
Bcmie of them graduated. He pur-
^poaely kept Wiljiams out of all
^unes this fall so he would have
three full seasons of competition.
However, Williams remained at
Northwestern and is a junior
this year.
DRAKE HAS TACKLE AND
HALFBACK •
the team as tailback. Motley
weights 210 pounds, and has
played varsity football for one
year.
Raymond Freeman, 20, former
ly of W'eber Junior College, is
tailback and Avingback. Weigh-
ing,178 pounds, Freeman is also
a member of the track team.
From Yubar Junior College
comes Ben Anderson, 19, and
weighing 202 pounds. His posit
ion is right end.
DES MOINES. la.,—(ANP)
Two of Drake’s football players
, this year are colored, Willard
 Cushingbcrr>', senior tackle, and
•Clifford Lovelady, brilliant
[|fi^>hmor(^ left halfback pr^pect.
5 Cushingberry, 6 feet tall and
195 pounds in weight, has been
jB regular the past two years. He
(eomes from Lawrence, Kans.
iLovelady, from West Des Moines
fwt 9 and weighs 165. Be
noted as an exceptional passer.
Diving completed heaves of 70
as a fresliman.
IkCHIGAH has SECOND
Potential grid star in
IJulius franks
ANN ARBOR, Mich.,—ANP
■iPor the second time in the his-
l^ry of the Unviereity of Mich-
l^^n, according to Fred H. De-
Ipjano, acting director of pr^
Ivelations, a Negro looms as a
ential letter winner in foot-
He is Julius Pranks, soph-
re guard prospect from Ha-
ek, Mich.
Although lettermen of the
iteasons are avilable, the 19
idd pounder may be the re-
guard before the season is
’ advanced. He is already out-
aa a defensive player
[ place Jcibker and if his block
imprqaae, he is to be on the
Uneup.
Ward, end through 19-
I the only, other N^ro
his letter in football at
aoeording to DeLano.
OF NEVADA
MMGBOBS ON
team
iO, Ner., (ANP) Al.
tiiece tn only a few
the Univer-
colored
iia rumtjr football
IMt aeamL The
of
D#e. 20.
Hot-
V IWritlBm
WALER STARS SENIOR
YEAR AS STAR IOWA
TACKLE
IOWA CITY, la., ()ANP)—
Jim Walker, since 1939 one of
the outstanding tackles in the
western conference, is playing
hi.s third and final season on
the University of Iowa football
team. He is the only Negro on
the current squad.
A 2Q0 pounder who stands 6
feet 1 inch tall. Walker is study
ing to be a coach. Last year he
played 60 minutes against Notre
Dame and Wiscounsin, blocking
a punt and grabbing the ball on
the bounce* in the latter game
for a 66 yard touchdown run
that broke a 12-12 tie. He was
handicapped part of his sopho
more year by a knee injury. Wal
ker is the only returning maJor
letter man among tackles.
A former football, baseball
and ba.sketball player at Wash.
High of South Bend, Ind., the
23 year old star is looking for
ward to his greatest season at
tackle.
BATES LOOKS FORWARD
TO GREAT YEAR AT
NEW YORK “U”
NEW YORK, (ANP)—With
on^ year of varsity cSperience
beliind him, Leonard Bates may
win the title of “Ramming Red
Cap” as regular fullback on the
1941 New York U. football team.
The chunky 25 year old star,
who has 198 pounds on a 5 foot
11 inch frame, is considered a
terrific defensive back aifd be
cause of his speed and build is
hard to bring down as a ball
carrier.
Bates, who worked the past
summer as a red cap, is ajunior
in the school of education and is
married. He is majoring in soc
ial work and gufdence. lie at
tended St. Paul’s in Ijawrence-
ville, Va. and Alexander Hamil
ton High school in Brooklyn be
fore enrolling at N. Y. IT. He is
also an outstanding member of
the track competing in the ham
mer, javelin, shot put and discus.
His coaches expect him to be
one ()if the ea.st’s outstanding
backs this season.
Hillside Hornets Take
Kinston Into Camp
By Score OF 31-0
Smart long distance runing
and excellent blocking were feat
ures of the Hillside High School
Hornets' 31-0 victory over
Adkins High of Kinston Thurs
day night at Durham Athletic
Park. It was the runing of Wal
lace, Kollock and PajK that gave
the Hornets an earmlead and
ma^.tJifi„Yisi*tJl^ defense look
gafcl^ed throftg!rotft the en
counter.
\ Although the—€irst—(quarter
elided without either team scor
ing, the Hornets got under way
in the second and registered 13
points. The first touchdown was
set up when W’’aUace took a re
verse from Pollock and dashed
15 yards. On the following play
he added another 13 yards to
bring the ball to the 18 from
which point Bower ran to cross
the goal line standing. Whitted
missed the kick for the extra
point. In the latter part of the
second quarter Richmond of
Hillside recovered a Kinston
fumble on Kinston’s 28 yard
stripe. Page ran from here to
the 5 yard line but was called
back when both teams were off
side. On the next play he ran
10 yards; then Wallace plunged
through left tackle for the se
cond tally. Kollock ran for the
extra point.
The first touchdown in the
third quarter made r^ady when
Brower intercepted a Kinston
Pass. Wallace brought the ball
to the 48 from where Kollock.
ran to the Kinston 12. Then Page
raced 11 yards to the 1 yard
stripe and Wallace went over.
After a series of attempted
passes,.^ Kinston, attempted to
Itick and the punt rebounded to
their 12 yard line. Page scored
on the following play for Hill
side. Wallace crossed over after
running ten yards for the final
6 points of the game in the final
quarter.
The Hillside band gave an ex
hibition at the half time and they
featured five petite brown ma
jorettes.
THE LINEUPS:
Hillside Kinston .
LE—Richmond Fields
LT....Howard Fuller
LG...-Macon S. Fields
C....Moore Codell
RG L. Smith F. Teach
RT....MeCullen Williams
RE DeBerry .... L. Moore
QB—Harris Moore
HB....Whitted Rliodes
HB__Wallace W. Teach
FB...fKollock Murphy
Substitions: Hillside; Rich, R.
Smith, Brower, Hopson, Whitted
Lee, Ford, Page, Galloway, Bul
lock.
Kinston: Hodgesm Wade,
Harris.
Score by Periods:
Hillside 0 13 12 6 —31
Kinston 0 0 0 0 —
HILLSIDE HORNETS HAVE
FIVJE HOME GAMES
This year the Hornets of Hill
side have three trips to make
and the local fans will get the
chance to see them in action five
more tmiesrTrips^’ill be made
to Chal^^ HlIl,^4)f^tober 17. Nor
folk, Va. October 31, and on
November 14 they journey to
High Point.
The home schdule is as follows:
October 2, Dudley High of
Greensboro
October 9, Booker T. Wash
ington of Columbia, S. C.
October 25, Peabody High of
Petersburg, Va. (Homecoming)
November 7, Dillard High of
Goldsboro
November 21, New Bern.
All of the home games will
be played at the Durham Athle
tic Park.
PARDON
c
COVERED UP THE FOREMAN
NE.W
ALL STAR GAME
TO PLAY HERE
Durham, Oct. 1, 1941. — An
All - Star baseball game, fea
turing civilian luminaries of the
diamond against those who have
entered the nation’s defense
forces, will wind up a big week
end of sports for fans of the
Durham territory on Sunday,
Oct. 5. The game, scheduled
for the local ball park, will fol
low the gala homecoming of
Duke University, with its “^an
nual parade and the Duke-Ten-
nessee grid game on Saturday.
Only bare expenses of bring
ing the players here will be de
ducted, and balance of the pro
ceeds from the game will go to
the British Pire Fighters, whose
work has been outstanding in
the bombed areas of England,
The Reception Center team of
oFrt Bragg will be pitted
against an array of maior and
minor league stars. The Port
Bragg team owns one of the
best records of the service ball
clubs, winning 44 or 49 games.
Many former professional stars
are in its lineup. Included are
Tex Deets, ace pitcher of the
Durham Bulls of the Piedmont
leagrue of 1940; Matty Topkins,
former University of North Car
olina shortstop who started the
past season with teh Boston Red
Sox farm at Greensboro; Julian
McCalf, formerly of Wake For
est; ‘ Lefty DeBruhl, Bernie
Keating and many others.
Heading the other nine will be
Buck Newsom of the Detroit
Tigers, Chubby Dean, Mickey
CHICAGO HOST
TO ANNUAL
CLASSIC
Chicago, .111.,—Thousands of
football fans will gather here for
the 12th Annual Tuskegee Wil-
berforce football game, which
will be played at t^oldier Field
at 8:30 o’clock Friday night,
Oct. 10. The clash has become
one'-of the nation’s outstanding
gridiron attractions and arousM
the community as perhaps no
other sports attraction does. It
is a battle in which Cleve L. Ab
bott, South Dakota State College
‘16, the crafty Tiger Mentor,
matches his wits against the well
planned attack of the widely-
know'n Gaston K Lewis, Wilber-
force alumnus, and the Green
Wave coach.
Tuskegee will bp without the
excellent services of Robert
'Moore, the Tiger Triple-threat
inducted into the army early,
summer who passed and punted
the team to several consecutive
victories last season. His duties
will be taken over by George
Robinson, the Hiawatha, Kan
sas, basketball luminary, who
will do the passing and punting
Marion Smiley and William
Shaw will give valuable assist
ance. Both are good field gene
rals and will be seen in action.
Word has been received here
that Coach Abbott is utilizing
every available hour to polish
the attack o| the Tuskegee team
Men who are receiving consider
able attention are Upshaw Sams,
the Beaumont, Texas, boy, mem
ber of the famous Tuskegee re
lay team, a dangerous man in
the open; Daniel James, 205
pound tackle; Robert Ivy, end;
Joshua Brown, tackle; Raymond
Head, one of the most elusive'
quarterbacks in Southern Col
lege circles: Junius Blake, tack
le: Dennis Stewart, Georgia,
basketball standouts who are re
garded as among the most pro
mising players on the 1941
squad.
Eagles Show Power
Against S. C. Eleven
In Interstate Meet
Hampton Hopes
Running High
For Big Season
ENTHUSIASM SWEEPS
HAMPTON CAMPUS AS
PIRATES' STOCK GOES UP
Hampton Institute, Va. —
There’s strange goings-on out at
Hampton Institute’s Armstrong
Field these days as the Pirate
gridders begin their last train
ing spurt before the opening
whistle Saturday, starting tht*'
season on the home gtounds a-
gainst St. Paul’s of Lawronce-
ville, Va.
A tital wave of entliusiasm,
generated by a live young team
and new coach, has swept from
the spectator fringe eagerly
watching fall practice, over the
campus and out to the Hampton
rooters throughout Tidewater
Virginia.
For Hampton this year
wearing a new brand of cocki
ness as it anticipates a break
once agin into its winning wys
of yesteryear.
With young James “Little
Train’ Griffin heading a veteran
coaching staff composing of
such stalwarts of C. I. A. A.
Livingston, Lester Brugc, Bill
Baker, Van Harrington, Crash
Davis, Gil English, Clarence
Campbell and others well known
to the fans.
A large crowd of enlisted men
and officers from Fort Bragg is
expected to be here for the
game to root, for their favorite
team. The game will be called
at 3 o’clock and admission has
been set at 35 cents for bleach
ers and 55 cents for grandstand,
tax included.
Cutest styles 19«i-42
THE TWO OREAT HATS
I*' ; ••rut
IWRIEMITE'; •
I ouioNfo iv'*HOWARD
rlHARUM'S UADINO MAT STYUST
news HCT£ — "MeWLY mveUTEO ttACMIUE MAKES AlAPUkHE RiVBTS
racM A SPOOL ex'WIRE-MUWPREP.7 FEU. MINUTE / *
mTIOOUCIKS"
I94i’» rACf-SEnn
/iMArt >Mt HARLEMITE*
mats in Alt SIZES—SHirrED ANTWHtS,j
^ Writ* for BeokM et HOWA»O S
ComplcM lliia el lf4l-42 SlylM
HOWARD HATS
air WEST IlSlh ST.
DEPT TY-I NEW YORK, H T.
competition as Gideon Smith, Hi
Harris and George Davis, Athle
tic Director C. H. Williams is
sporting the same grin that has
always warned the league of a
dangerous Pirate squad.
(This year it’s a light, fast
squad using an adaption of Min
nesota’s shifting wing back and
spinner plays. A backfield of
tricky “scat” backs, buttressed
by 12 lettermen from last year’s
squad. Competion is stiff at
Armstrong field and there are
eight good men battling for ev
ery position on the big blue and
white team.
Meanwhile, a concerted drive
to lacqujaint tJie student bod}'
and nearby, comnuinities of the
new prominent alumni athletic
stars ajul the newly reorganized
Varsity club at the seaside in
stitution.
The Club will sponsor an “all
out” pep rally in pgden Ilall
on the campus Friday evening
prior to the St. Paul game, and
the alumni stars have started a
movement among Hampton grad
uates who have won their “II”
N. C. STATE SCORES EASY
WIN IN INTERSECIONAL
CLAS5C #
'DarkJLaughter
By “Bill’» Tuck
The Eagles of North Coralina
College lived up to all expecta
tions at Wilson last Friday night
wlien they scored a decisivs 19-
0 victory over the Bulldogs of
South Carolina State.
The first quarter of this en
counter ended without first
downs. The kicking of Duck-
wilder of the Eagjes kept Sf C'.'
State deep in their own territory
most of the time. In the second
period the Eagles initiated a
touchdown march that would not
be halted until Brewington plun
ged through tackle from the
three yard stripe for the first 6
points. This drive began when
LaFayette, freshman back from
Pa., returned a punt 29 yards to
the 49, after which he threw a
pass to Ledbedder for a first
down. He fdflowed this up with
run to the 35. Hawis pi«fced
up 9 yards and Williams took a
pass from I^aFayette and ran
18 yards. Williams added anoth
er 12 yards on the next play and
Brewington came in to score the
touchdown after two attempts.
N. C. State scored again in the
fourth quarter when there were
just 6 minutes left in the game.
Lafayette had brought the ball
to the S. C. 28 when Edgsmonds
intercepted his pass. Lafayette
I later intercepted a pass from Mc-
BY OL HARRINGfOM
^ sis'teF-in-Iaw. 1 have a date tonigiit
with Mr. Bootsie and I thought I oughta have him around.”
    

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