North Carolina Newspapers

    rAOt SIGHT
m OAmouNA moi , Saturday, jan ». ims
BROWSING WITH BROWEH
By Frank Brower
A SOLDIE^ CONFESSION
Now Vve had my sake in oW Japan,
And pulque in Mexico;
I reckon I've drank from glass, or can,
Whatever liquors that flow.
Brandy and soda along the Strand,
And mescal doum the Rio Grande,
But gosh, what a drink in Dixieland
It sJdmmin's! i*
Damon Rumtom
NOTICE TO MR. AND MRS. AMERICA—The Rusiian
UN delegate said, “Dr. Tobias, you should be telling, us about
how your people are treated in the
United States.” He named every
state in the Union, tellings of its
laws. Th^n he mentioned Geor-
ginia .... Dr. Tobias in his clam,
learned ways said:. “I was bom in
the state of Georgia which has such
bad laws. But today I represent
my entire country in the United
Nations. I have never said that we
don’t have states with bad laws,
nor that we do noT have states
with good laws, which are not en
forced. I do say that we have the opportunity to move for
ward and so 1 am proud to represent my country ... all 48
states.”
Then Dr. Tobias went back to his original point, but
there was dead silence from the Russians.—Eleanor Roo6b-
VXLT.
TOOTH-PICKING TIME IN FALSETEETH VALLEY—
February 6 and 7 NCC have the first annual Midwinter
Sports Carnival . . . It’s shapes up to be the greatest sports
in local colleges . . . There will be two days of activities
bringing to this city teams from Tennessee Sti*te, West Vir
ginia, Lincoln, A. and T. and Shaw; engaging in Indoor Ten
nis, Swinuning Matches, Wrestling Exhibitions and Two
Ba^etball Games . .. From Lynchbiu'g comes news that the
Links Club will have a Regional February 14 there . . . Un
dertaker Cleveland Burthey is proud father of a son, Grover
Cleveland Burthey, Jr. . . . Better halfs of John L. Stewart,
(dean of men at NCC) and the Dr. Bob Dawson, are in-
fanticipating . . . H looks like the employees 9f NCC will get
a 10 percent increase across the board, probably March 1.
This will do much to increase Governor Umstead’s popular
ity.
THINGS YOU COULDN’T SEE ON A SIGHTSEEING
TOUR—new heart interest for Dr. Bill Clarke of Raleigh
. . . New doctor to Southern Pines replacing Dr. Ross ....
Nathan Garrett home on first furlough from Army .. . Law
Exams had Bill Pearson covered . . . Alex Rivera had John
son Motor Company pushing his car to the garage for repairs
and discovered later it was only out of gas . . . Beauticians
ended confab at NCC this week . . . Lath Alston presents
CLOVERS here Friday night. ,. George Logan, Jr. presents
Royals and Sweethearts of Rhythm at Regal Wednesday and
a Ramble . . . Lionel Hampton in Raleigb, February 2 . . .
Representative of School of Social Work at NCC opened his
remarks at NCC Chapel Monday ... “All interested students
are herewith requested to apply for UNC Schoql of Social
Work” . . . Looks like the Ph.D. program ends before it starts'
at North Carolina College as the State refuses to grant money
for necessary buildings . . . Ex-Govemor Scott advised, “No
need to pump more money in that Rat Hole ” ? ? ? Was he
speaking figuratively or metaphorically, a man on Hayti
Street asks . . . The Hillside High School Homete cop^
two victories from Johnson County Training School of Smith-
field, the girls won a 100-10 victory and the boys 65-50 . . .
The only time people dislike gossip is when you gossip about
them—^Will Rogers . . . and Joseph Conrad expounds that
gossip is what no one claims to like, but everyone enjoys
. . . The reason a great many people do not recognize an op
portunity when they meet it is that it usually goes around
wearing overalls and looking like hard work . . . Tales of
Hnffmnn . „ Tired and Thirty . .. Cousin Frank at the Logan
Building.
GLANCIMC AT THE
GIRL SCOUTS
CALL 5-0643
By WILHELMINIA MORRISON
ly and satisfying.
Bye Now,
Your Julia Warren Scout Newi
Reporter
-Board-
(Continued from Page One)
ttnued.”
Rev. Crawford laid that he
could fee no criteria in the find
ings of the committee to pre
vent Negroes from attending
cultural and religious events in
the auditorium.
E. T. Pullen, chairman of the
the city scool board, said he had
talked to many citizens about
the question—“some of our best
and most respected citizens—
and they have told me they feel
that the time is not quite ready.”
“Of course the time is never
ready if we never make steps
for it,” Rev. Crawford asserted.
‘We don’t know until we make
stei» in that direction. A few
Negroes have attended events at
Reynolds auditorium, and the
people who went in white came
out >vhite and those who went
in black came out black. Either
we are out ot line or we’re not
ready for progress,” he con
tinued.
What would be wrong v ith
my inviting a, few people like
the Rev. Kenneth Williams (ior-
mer alderman) Dr. Ftancis At
kins (President of Winston-Sa*
lera Teachers College) and other
^ighly respected Negro citizzens
to worship with me at the
Preaching Mission? (The
Preaching Mission is a program
held at the auditorium)
1 think we have made a lot
of progress since 1922, when this
auditorium was built. Many
things have happened to bring
atiout better relationships. We
first started out on a segregated
basis, but we have come to real
ize that culture and religion are
not confined to any race or any
particular groups. People in
every walk of life have an ap
preciation for these things.
"We have reached the poi^t
where this thing is out to be
more democratic. I assume every
person on the School Board is
a member ot a church—^if you’re
going to say you can’t worship
in the same building with us,
then it’s un-Christian. I don’t
think the School Board ought
to be a group saying you can’t
when the trends of the times say
it can, or will be, soon.”
■ Walter pointed out that the
Coliseum would be built soon
where undoubtedly some ar
rangements would be made to
take care of Negroes. He added
tliat most of the functions now
held at the Reynolds auditorium
would be held at the Coliseum.
“But in absence of the Coli
seum,” Rev. Crawford replied,
“let’s avail ourselves of what
we have.”
Mrs. McGee commented after
the vote that she felt there “are
still grounds for a lot of think
ing. I hate to see us reject this
oppertunity for better race re
lations on the basis that we are,
perhaps, a little afraid, or that
it will work itself out.”
At this point, Pullen injected:
“Oh, I think it will work itself
out.”
J. S. STEWART
HARRIS
JAMES T. TAYLOR
Hello there;
Your news reporter is again
spying in on your troops. Did
you do anything of interest last
week?
Girl Scout Troop 45 of East
End Elementary School is learn
ing First-Aid which is being
taught by Miss Dorothy Perry,
R. N. of Lincoln Hospital. Miss
Lenora Jeffries, who studied in
Mexico the past summer is sche
duled to visit and acquaint th«n
with Mexico. Mrs. E. B. Plum
mer is leader of this progressive
troop.
“The Girl Scout will leam
that Scouting means more to her
because her adult friends bring
maturity, good judgment, and
wider horizons and help her set
realistic but high goals for her
telf. She should leam also what
her enthusiasm, her zest for ad
venture, her energetic applica
tion al the trial-and-error
method do for you. It is your
privilege and your obligation
to make this relationship clear.”
Mr*. Lulu Booker, our ener
getic field executive, who suc-
cc?eded Mrs. Geneva Stanback is
now in Lenox, Massachusetts
matriculating in a Professional
Orientation Course. She will be
thtre until February 14. Drop
h a card, she would enjoy
hearing from you. The address
i.-i: Music Inn, Lenox, Mass.
/.crccts, Holidays, Special
Event*
Feb. 1-28—Girl Guide, and Girl
Scout International
Month.
Feb. 7-13—B6y Scout Week
Fe*) e—Race Relations Sunday
F- b 12 —Birthday of AUraham
Lincoln
Feb. 14—St. ValentltUi’s Day
' 1 Scouting is no lonely
|>uai»ws. it is-say, liagiiy, friasd-
‘It will never work
out without our help,”
Crawford asserted.
itself
Rev.
DR. C. E. BOVLWARE
Politics in the Hayti area of
Durham started popping here
this week as the names of sev
eral well-known personalities
in tlfe fields of business and
education were being mention
ed as possible candidate for
the City Council. Although the
election will not be held until
May 5, the political pot is be
ginning to boil with unsual in
tensity.
The names of two persons
most often mentioned aa be
ing most likely to seek the of
fice are R. N. Harris, secre-
tary-manager of the Bankers’
J. J. HENDERSON
Insurance Company and James
T. Taylor, instructor at North
Carolina College. Both Harris
and Taylor have sought ihe
office biefore and it is definite
ly known that one or both of
them is seriously thinking of
attempting; the race again.
So far as the vote-getting
ability of the two men. It is be-
Iic\ed that they stand about
on an even plane. Taylor, It is
believed, would have the sup
port of those in the field of
education, while Harris would
probably draw his greatest
support from labor and the
Harriet Tubman
Branch YWCA
Sunday, February 1, 1:30
p.m.—^The Dramatic , Interest
Group will meet at the YWCA.
Characters will be chosen for
the cast in the three act comedy
“Calling All Carrs” which is
under the direction of Her
man Boykin. Persons who are
interested are urged to attend.
Tuesday, February 3, fl:00
p.m.—The Gay Y’ers Club will
meet at the home of Mrs. Ber-
thfi Snipes, 1207 Glenn Street.
8:00 p.m.—^The Spinning Y’ers
Club will meet in East Durham.
For further information call
Miss Julia Morrison, 5-0643.
Sunday, February 8, 4:00
p.m.—The Yotmg Adult Com
mittee will meet at the YWCA.
Mrs. Willie B. Bradsher, the
chairman, will preside.
The Junior Hosteases’ Club
Recently, the members of this
club entertained servicemen
who are patients at the U. S.
Army Hospital at Fort Bragg.
Games, square dancing and so
cial conversation made the oc
casion quite enjoyable for all.
Miss Julia Morrison recited
“Creation” at the conclusion of
our brief program.
Refreslunents included cook
ies ^and a birthday cake which
were l>aked by the group and
Mrvod with punch.
Those , participating were:
Misses Troylee Holeman, Bessie
W.'nsten, Mary Cotton, Mamie
-Scouters-
(Continued from Page One)
Troop in Durham. Since then he
has served as chairman of the
Health and Safety Committee,
Merit Badge Counselor, Organi
zation and Extension Committee,
troop committeeman and now
Vice-Chairman of the Durham
Divisional Committee.
Other ^wards made at this
meeting were: Ten-Year Service
Award to Scouter J. H. Betts;
and an Attendance Award to
Scoutmaster A. J. McLucas of
Sanford for the highest man-
miles traveled to attend this din
ner meeting.
J. M. Schooler, Area Division
al Chairman presided and was
re-elected Chairman, along with
Rev. T. H. Brooics of Oxford
yice-Chairman and P. A, Wil
liams of Apex, Commissioner.
Short talks were given by
Horace W. Fowler, Chairman ot
Durham District and S. P. Gas
kin, Scout Executive of Occon-
eechee Council who presented
Scouters Clyde Wheeler, A. C.
Pledger and Field Executive II.
W.jGillis, D. N. Howard and Ros-.
coe Stevens.
The guest speaker of the eve
ning was Dr. M. A. Williams,
Professor of Education and Psy
chology at Shaw University. Dr.
Williams challenged and inspir
ed the Scouters, their wives and
guests on doing a bigger and hot
ter job in Spouting for the boys
of this Council.
P. W. Moore
Student Appears
On T. V. Show
ELIZABETH CITY
The principal, E. A. Ander-
.ion, faculty and student body of
‘he P. Moore High School
felt justly proud of the talented
Henry Rouson as they watched
him perform on the T. V. Show
“Teen Doin’s” last Thursday
evening. Acclaimed by T. V.
experts as a star of tomorrow,
Rnii.snn rendered two JjeautUul.
numbers, “The Lord’s Prayer,”
and “Because You’re Mine.” He
was accompanied by Mrs. Sarah
Mackey Everett.
Henry Rouson, a senior of
the P. W: Moore High School, is
a very outstanding member of
the choral club, basketball team
and student council.
As a result of the T. V. Show,
the talented tenor has been re
quested to appear in concert be
fore several civic organizations.
tiaining to the new replace
ments in the division on the
Japanese Islands. The 1st spent
17 months in the combat zone
before rotatefl out of the line iij
December 1951.
A rifleman in his unit. Sharp-
less entered the Army last July.
He is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
Oscar Sharpless, Route 1, Chin
quapin.
Run-A-Way-
(Continued from Page One)
Police said the 'two youths
were dead on arrival at the
hospital.
Mrs. Masten has been charged
with manslaughter and placed
under $5,000 bond.
D. B. MARTIN
business group.
So evenly divided are the
forces on the candidacy of Har
ris and Taylor that a possible
“dark horse” is being occasion
ally mentioned. Among them
are Dr. C. E. ‘Bonlware, math
ematics instructor at North
Carolina College; J. S. Stew
art, secretary-manager Mutual
Savings and Loan Association;
J. J. Henderson, assistant to
the comptroller at North Car
olina Mutual Life Insurance
Company and D. B. Marttn, as
sistant agency director of the
company.
secure an office for the local
chapter on the college campus.
President Rivera thanked the
members for their support of
the chapter’s program for the
past year and asked for their
continued support. He also
urged them to make meeting
nights, the third Wednesday of
each month, a “must” on their
calendars.
NQUTODE CONTROl PAYS OFF
AT THE TOBACCO HAtKET
Jesse Lyons, Negro of Mid
way community, " Route 5,
Winston-Salem, and his land
lord, Norman Shoaf participat
ed in something of a demonstra
tion last year that dramatically
shows the advantage of nema
tode control, according to C, E.
Bernhardt, Davidson County
farm agent for the State College
Extension Service.
Shoaf planted two acres of
tobacco which he fertilized with
2,100 pounds of 3-9-6 and fumi
gated the land, that had been
in tobacco for three years, with
DD. His yield was 4,282 pounds.
Lyons planted 2.9 acres, us
ing 3,000 pounds of 3-9-6 fertili
zer. Previously, the land had
been in cotton in 1951, lespede-
za in 19S0, and oats in 1949.
He did not use chemical fumi
gation for nematode control.
His yield was 4,764 pounds.
Both farmers used Yellow
Special plants from the same
plAit bed and set them in ad
joining fields. Both crops-were
.;ultivated and cured alike and
vere sold on the same day at
he same market.
Shoaf received $55.50 per
lundred for his tobacco grown
on treated land while Lyons re
ceived only $36.25 for that pro
duced on the untreated land.
M^^lnampton, accl£^c
the musical world as America’s
Greatest Showman, will ap
pear in Raleigh, Monday, Feb.
2 at the Raleigh Memorial
Auditorium. He will be ac
companied by hit orchestra
and a brand new variety show
for 1953, featuring Curly, the
sensational drummer, Sonnv
Parker, Jimmie Scott, and
Elsie Smith.
Weaver, Grace Fowler, Eunice
Josey, Gladys Moore, Margaret
Rogers, Julia Morrison, Mary
Cruse, Bertha Allen, Gertrude
Cobb, Ruth' McLaughlin, Jose
phine Morgan and Nezzie Carter.
Pvt. Sharpless
Serving In First
Calvary In Japan
WITH THE 1ST CAVALARY
”)lVISTON IN JAPAN
Pvt. Floyd Sharpless, whose
"ife, Mamie Lee, lives at 1714
•\. Jackson ave., Winston-Salem,
is now serving in Japa^ with
the 1st Calvary Division.
Veterans of the Korean con-
lict are giving intensive field
Membership Drive
Planned By NCC
Alumni Ass’n.
Plans for increasing its mem
bership will figure to a large de
gree in the year’s activities of
the Durham chapter of the North
Carolina College Alumni Asso
ciation.
This was made clear at the
first meeting of the year for the
local group held last Thursday
night at the Algonquin club
house. Durham chapter presi
dent Alex Rivera, now entering
his ^cond term, outlined a
broad program of activities for
the year which placed emphasis
on building the chapter’s mem
bership.
The proposed program was
received enthusiastically from
the approximately 40 persons
present at the meeting.
Among the officers elected at
the meeting were Mrs. Hazel
Rivera, recording secretary; and
Miss Alma Southerland, corre
sponding secretary. A committee
was also appointed to seek to
HILLSIDE PI A
TO MLET
The Hillside High School
Parents and Teachers Associa
tion will celebrate it’s annual
Father’s Night at the regular
scheduled meeting to be held
Monday. February 2, in the
Hillside High School Auditor
ium. Speaker for the occasion
will be W. A. Clement, Assist
ant Agency Director for the
North Carolina Mutual Life
Insurance Company.
NAACP HoMs
Monllily Meet
BURLINGTON
The National Association for
the Advancement of Colored
People held its first meeting of
the year January 12 at the Eben-
ezer Christian Church Hut, Ap
ple Street, with its new presi
dent C. H. Couch, presiding,
siding.
Other new officers o^ the year
ate: Mrs. Lorie Graham, First
Vice-President; Winfield Wiley,
Second Vice-President; Miss
Margaret W. Faucette, Secretary;
Mrs. Ella Stephens, Assistant
Secretary; John Hazel, treasurer.
Chairmen of the standing com
mittees are: Garland Corljett,
Membership; Mrs. L. L. Graham,
Coordinating; Mrs. N. Collins,
Publicity; Mrs. Pauline Johns^,
Assistant Publicity; Mrs. Lilly
Wagstaff, Finance; John Ba
hadur, Legal Redress; Dr. Robert
Lesueur, Education; James Isley,
Entertaining; Mrs. Pearlie M.
Lea, Chaplain; C. H. Couch,
Youth Council and Mrs. Nellie
Scott, Program.
Mr. Couch gave a brief outline
of the program for the year with
special emphasis on increasing
membership and finance. Much
attention was devoted to the dis
cussion on Youth Council and
ways in which the organization
might work with local juvenile
courts and officials in helping to
lessen juvenile delinquency.
-Goins-
(Continued from Page One)
He was married in 1923 to
Mrs. Eva L. Goins who sur
vives him. Other survivors in
clude two son, Elwood Whit-
ted and Martin Arthur, Jr., and
two grandchildren.
'•W% A I Memorial
RALEIGH
Auditorium
PIANO
fTHE
ST/W^l
^VAIIIETy SHaW
ONE NieHT-ONLY
ON. NITE, FEB 2-9 P. M.
°vance _ $1.50
— NOTICE —
NORMAN SMITH
Barber, Formerly With Beatty’s
Berber Sliop, Is Now With
DeLUXE BARBER SHOP
511 Fayetteville St. Phone 4-0752
ANNOUNCING THE OPENING
OF
BATES' IEAUTV NOOK
616 PINE STREET — PHONE 2-6363
WE WILL BE OPENED FOR BUSINESS
; FEBRUARY 4
’OPERATORS:
MISS MONTEZ BATES ' MRS MILDRED SELLERS
MRS. LELA WISE
Smart
ivUthTt
Calvert
lUNMO * BOTTUO n
THE CALVUT DfflTIUJNC Ca
■ALTlMOtt Nft. Lovttvlux K«
Calvert
RESERVE
*2-30
I’lNT
*3.65
Vi quart
CALVERT DISTILLERS CORPORATION
NEW YORK CITY
Blended Whiskey 86.8 proof, 6^ train neutral q>irlM
    

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