North Carolina Newspapers

    WORDS OF WISDOM
"There can be no equal justice
where the kind of trial a man gets
depends on the amount of money he
has."
Supreme Court Justice Hugo L. Black
VOLUME 51 No. 7
KU KLUX MAN MARCHING AGAIN IN MONROE
********** *********
A Hedged Panthers Given Prison Term
Mahalia Leaves Kin Over $1 Million;
Two Ex-Husbands Get Not A Dime
CHlCAGO—Despite letting an estate valued at more
$1 million, goapel great Mahalia Jackson did not
leave either of her two former husbands "a dime" accord
ing to press reports.
Jackson's attorney, Eugene J. Shapiro, is quoted as
saying that the magnifident gospel singer's ezhusbands,
Ike Hocpenhull and Minters Sigmund Galloway, were not
mentioned in her last will.
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AWARDED NNPA PLAQUB—From left, William Porter, Assia
tant to Vice President Marketing Operations, Anheeuser-
Bushch, Inc., shows obivious happiness over plaque Just award
ed in Los Angeles, Calif., by the National Newspaper Publish
ers Association, with Garth C. Reevs of the Miami Times, Presi
dent of the Association, in center and Association Director
John H. Sengstacke of Sengstacke Newspapers at right.
V/. T. Small, Jr.
Of Minority Affair U.N.C.
CHAPEL HILL - William
T. Small Jr. has been appointed
coordinator of minority affairs
for the UNC School of Public
Health.
The appointment was made
by Fred T. Mayes, dean of the
School of Public Health.
Small's role will be to re
cruit minority group students
into the school's 10 depart
ments.
"Right now the School of
Public Health has only two
percent minority group stu
dents," Small said. "But by
the fall of 1972 we expect to
have as many as 15 percent
enrolled. And by 1975 we are
shooting for a high of 25 per
cent."
Small said that during the
past two years the number of
students from minority groups
has been declining with four
percent in 1969 and three per
cent in 1970.
In his recruiting trips
around the state and outside
North Carolina Small is telling
prospective students to look
Three Youths Sentenced to 7
To Ten Years in Shootout Case
By JAMES VAUGHAN
Three Black youths, part of
a group of four alledged mem
bers of a local Black Panther
group were sentenced to prison
terms last week, in High Point.
The four youths were
brought to trial for participa
tion in a shootout with the
local police nearly a year ago
which resulted in the critical
wounding of Police Lt. Shaw
Cooke who was shot in the
chest by a bullet from a high
powered rifle.
The three, Larry Medley,
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Hi
SMALL
beyond the traditional profes
sions of law, teaching, indus
try, business and medicine.
"In the School of Public
,Health alone we offer 50 dif
ferent professional programs at
the graduate level. And in these
fields jobs are plentiful.> Best
of all - salaries generally start
at around $12,000 with pro
fessional training."
A graduate of North Caro
(See SMALL 10X)
17, Bradford Lilly, 20, both of
High Point, and Randolph
Jennings, 18, of Winston-Salem
were sentenced to seven to
10 years in prison.
The jury found the three
youths guilty of assault with
a deadly weapon with intent
to kill during the shootout
from an alledged Black Pan
ther headquarters.
The fourth defendant,
George DeWitt, 17, was found
innocent. All four were found
not guilty of assault on a police
(See YOUTHS 10A)
Che Ca^^Cim^o
I CONGRESSWOMAN SHIRLEY |
Chisholm In City
N. C. at Bottom
In Registration
Of Black People
John Edwards, Director of
the North Carolina Voter Edu
cation, speaking in Burgaw,
recently called upon Blacks
across the state to increase
their voter registration work.
The state ranks at the bottom
in Black registration among
Southern states. Edwards said
that while many Black candi
dates are filing - the deadline
for filing is February 21 -
many will not be elected unless
Black registration is increased.
For the past several years,
North Carolina has ranked at
the bottom among Southern
states in Black registration. The
director of the Durham-based
organization said that the latest
statistics indicate that the state
is still at the bottom in Black
registration. Only 46 per cent
of the eligible Blacks are re
(See REGISTRATION 10A)
Negro Running For
Student President
CHAPEL HILL
Richard Epps of Wilmington
has become the first black stu
dent to run for president of the
student body at the University
of North Carolina.
Epps, a junior journalism
major, announced Wednesday
he would be a candidate in the
student election, slated for
Feb. 29.
Epps, who has held several
minor posts In student govern
ment, is the only announced
candidate so far. .
British novelist George Mer
edith said, "Who rises from
prayer a better man, his pray
er is answered."
GRAND DRAGON GRIFFIN. „.
I Bring that Nigger
Bock ... So We '
MONROE - The Ku Klux -
Klan is marching again in Mon
roe.
The grand dragon, Virgin
Lee Griffin, says they want
"to bring that nigger Robert
Williams back so we can hang
him," according to SCEF news '
release.
That's what Police Chief Al-
Mauney quoted the dragon as
saying, just before the chief re
fused the Klan a permit to
parade in the street.
The dragon and his friends
from the National White Peo
ple's Party then paraded on the
sidewalk. Young black people
stood by and jeered. They
chanted "Free Robert Wil
liams! Free Robert Williams!"
Hundreds of black and
white citizens are asking Gov.
(See KLAN 10A)
DURHAM, N. C, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1972
Wf
I
MRS. CHitHOLM
•
Speaks at Duke U.'s
Page Auditorium
Monday, February 7
By JOHN MYERS
Mrs. Shirley Chisholm,
America's first black woman
elected to congress, from
Brooklyn, N. Y., spoke at
Page Auditorium on Duke
University campus Monday,
February 7.
Mrs. Chisholm strongly an
nounced her intentions for the
office of president in the up
coming national elections. In
her address she stated causes
for the wide-spread confusion !
(See CHISHOLM 10A)
Trial of Republic of New Africa 7
To Begin In Mississippi In March
JACKSON, Miss - Trial of
the RNA Eleven will start
March 27 before Judge Russel
B. Moore 111 in Hinds County
Circuit Court. First to be
tried will be Hekima Ana.
The date was set by Judge
Moore after a week of hearings
on motions by attorneys for
members and officers of the
Republic of New Africa (RNA)
Seven of the 11 have been
in jail under high bonds since a
shoot-out here last August. A
police lieutenant was killed and
a patrolman and an FBI agent
were wounded after officers at
tacked headquarters of the
RNA.
During the hearings, FBI
agents refused to tell the name
Professor of Music at Smith U. is
"WBT's Woman of the Year"
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MRS. HAIRSTON
Orange County
Blacks Arrested
For Murder
By JAMES VAUGHAN
Four Black youths have
been arrested in the stabbing
death of an Orange High
School youth and the wound
ing of another police officials
reported recently.
The stabbing incidents
started when an Orange Coun
ty Black assistant principal,
Vemon Copeland ordered a
group of Black non-students to
leave the area where students
were loading the school buses.
According to accounts, Cope
land was being attacked by the
intruders when two students,
Billy Goodwin, 17, and Donnie
Riddle, 18, went to his aide.
Riddle was stabbed to death
i2.il Goodwin was hospitalized
for stab wounds.
The Washington, D. C. ar
rest of Archie Parker, 18, last
Friday marked the latest arrest
of five suspects sought by the
(See ORANGE 10A)
of an informer who caused the
agents ana Jackson police to
go to the house where the
shooting took place.
The agents said the informer
told them that Jerry Steiner,
wanted on a federal warrant
issued in Michigan was living
at 1148 Lewis Street. This is
headquarters of the RNA.
Judge Moore refused to
force the FBI to give the name
of the informer. He promised
to rule later on a motion to
dismiss the indictment against
the Eleven because of hostile
coverage of their case by the
regular news media.
Meantime, there is mount
ing criticism of the way police
SM TRIAL IQA)
CHARLOTTE - Mrs.
Jacqueline Butler Hairston, As
sistant Professor of Music at
Johnson C. Smith University,
has been named the 1971
winner of WBT's Woman of
the Year Award. The presen
tation was made at a luncheon
last week at the Charlotte
City Club.
Presented by one of the
largest CBS affiliates in the
South, the honor comes as a
results of her contributions to
the city and service to humani
ty-
(See PROFESSOR 10A)
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Green Circle Program Launched
At Lyon Park Elementary School
A pilot project for teaching
human relations in elementary
schools was introduced at
Lyon Park School on Kent
Street Tuesday, Feb. 1 by Dr.
Vernon Clark.
The program is sponsored
by the Durham Human Re
lations Commission and by
Lyon Park Elementary School.
The objectives of the Green
Circle Program are to encour
age and assist children to pre
pare for the line creatively
with human diversity; to en
courage the practice of inclu
siveness based on positive
interest in and acceptance of
differences rather than re
jection based on prejudiced
notions or stereotypes; and to
develop positive self-concepts
and self-acceptance as well as
greater sensitivity to the feel
ings and values of others.
Evaluation by principals,
~| SB H B| ■ " ||
I
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RIYNOLOS SIGNS CONTRACT WITH WIM>
STON MUTUAL—Chas. B .Wade, Jr. senior
vice president of R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.,
signs a contract with Winston Mutual life
Insurance Company to provide group life in
Winston Mutual
Signs Contract With Reynolds
WINSTON-SALEM - Win
ston Mutual Life Insurance
Company, a predominately
black firm, has signed a con
tract with R. J. Reynolds To
bacco Company to provide
group life insurance for RJR's
seasonal employees.
The contract represents the
first between the two com
panies, and covers about 1,600
Durham Business and Professional Chain
Banquet Set For February 11 at N. C.
Centra] University's Cafeteria
•
HUMAN RELATIONS WEEK
February 13-20
OIL VWtNON CLARK AMD STUMNTS
teachers, students, and volun
teers will be on February 28.
Observation and direct feed
back on attitudes and behavior
changes will be discussed.
The Green Circle is a
method Dr. Clark used in the
classroom to symbolize the
world to the children. In side
the circle he placed the chil
dren and their relatives and
friends. As the program pro
gressed, the circle grew larger
and the attitude of not want
ing the circle to stop growing
was predominant throughout
the hour.
Volunteers connected with
the program are: Dr. Vemon
Clark, Mrs. Mildred 0. Page,
Mrs. Penelope H. Strandburg,
Mrs. Linda M. Sneed, Mrs.
Verdelle J. Johnston, Mrs.
Lyda F. Wray, and Bud
Walker.
surance tor Kjn i wanna I ww»>
ing Wade »ign are A. W. McKnight daft),
Sec.-Treai. of Winston Mutual, and Geocga
E. Hill, president of the Winston-Salem band
Insurance firm.
employees in Reynolds' leaf
processing department.
"We are proud of the
growth of Winston Mutual over
the many years they have been
doing business in Winston-
Salem," said Chas. B. Wade,
Jr., senior vice president of
Reynolds. "This was a big
factor in deciding to enter in
to this agreement."
PRICE: 20 CKNTB
m
u 9
COLONEL TUBUS
Theus Becomes 2nd
Black General In
U. S. Air Force
WASHINGTON, D. C. -
The President announced to
day the nomination to the
United States Senate of 76 Air
Force colonels for appoint
ment to the grade of tempor
ary brigadier general. Included
was Colonel Lucius The us,
(See GENERAL 10A)
George E. Hill, president of
Winston Mutual, said, "We are
elated over beginning what we
hope will be a long and happy
relationship with a very good
company."
Winston Mutual is a Win
ston-Salem based company
with total assets of $4.8 mil
lion. The firm was founded in
1906.
    

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