North Carolina Newspapers

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VOL. XXVII.
CHARLOTTE, N. C., TUESDAY JANUARY 10, 1882.
NO. 3,994.
' liberal StducHmJbr Club.
Cry ajaaas.
1 TV
:i: :o:
Lyons' Patent Metallic Stiffened
PREVENTS
Boots and Shoes
-"FROM-
RUNNING OYER,
Wearing off at the Sides or Ripping
IN THE SEAMS.
Johnson's Silk and Felt Insolts
PREVENTS
RHEUMATIC CBAHP. COLD FEET. BUNNIONS
AND CHILBLAINS.
PEGRAM & CO.,
SOLS AGENTS.
janl
IsczIImizbub.
smsa x oiva -health.
"Excellent Tonic, Alterative and DlureOe."
VaHImI A .antlatlnn 1 .TTinhhliri?-YrL
"Used with great benefit in Malaria and Diph
theria." S. F. Dupon, wL v.. ta.
"Successfully used In dyspepsia, chronic diar
rhoea and scrofula." ProL 8. Jackson, M. D.,
univ. renn.
"Invaluable as a nervous tonic" -Hon. L C.
"Recommended as a prophylactic hi malarial
itl.t.lt. II T t ValMnr M F K O
"Restores debilitated systems to health." T. C.
"Adapted In bronlc diarrhoea, scrofula, and
dyspepsia.-" ueo. T. uarrison, m. w., p. x.
"Successful in diphtheria and neuralgia, J. P.
"Prompt In relieving headache, sick and ner
vous." nev. k. v. uoason.
"Used with mat benefit In dyspepsia." J. Mo-
Ralph, M. D., Pa.
"Butted to bronchitis and diseases of dlgestiYf
AmMkn t vi n w w n Ala .
"Most valuable remedy known for female dis
eases. "Jno. p. Metteaur. M. D., L. L. D. -
"Of great curative virtue." Thoa, F. Bumfold,
M. D.. Mo. . . ,
"Beneficial In uterine derangement and mala
rious conditions." G. M. Vail, M. D., Ohio.
"Charming on the complexion, making n
smooth, clear, soft and rosy." Miss M-, of 8. C.
,he prince of miperal Jpnlcs."-Franela GO-
'U nestimable as a tonio and artoraUTe." m
vr Mcuuire. is, v., va.
"Fine appetiser and blood pariller." H. Fisher,
4-. f utt .
"Very beneflelal In Improving a reduced sys
tem." BUhop Beekwltb, f Ga. L i
. "Invalids here find weleome and health." BBTi
John Hannon. lata of La., now of Rlchmondya
"Has real merit. "--Southern Med. joarna..-.
Water. S4 case. Mass and Pills. 25. 50. 75
8ummr season ef Springs beglni lit June. 935
Goo
1 1 H IsW 1 '' I l in U
lis-; . jwy3 A angs
A- M- DAVTKS, Pres't of the Cp
78 Main 6t, Lynehburg. Va., P. a Box 174.
BOLD BT
WILSON A BUR WELL, v
J. H. MeADEN, and -- '
'J WBJSTONCO., M
mar27 Charlotte, N. C.
IFBLQiE&E
TO-DAY
ALL-
WILL BE SOLD AT
GREAT SACRIFICE,
TO MAKE ROOM FOR
SPRING PURCHASES.
We Mean Every Word of This
AND
Only Ask an Inspection to Convince Yon
T. L. Seiglft & Co.
Neuralgia, Sprains,
. Pain in the .Back and Side.
i There la nothing more painful than these
diseases; but the pain can be removed and
the disease cured by use of Perry Davis'
Pain Killer.
This remedy is not a cheap Benzine
or Petroleum product that must be kept
away from fire or heat to avoid danger
of explosion, nor is it an untried experi
ment that may do more harm than good.
Pain Killer has been In constant use
for forty years, and the universal testimony
from all parts of the world is, It never
f ai Is. It not only effects a permanent cure,
but It relieves pain almost Instantaneously.
Being a purely vegetable remedy, It Is sale
In the hands of the most inexperienced.
The record of cures by the use of Pact
Killkk would fill volumes. The following
extracts from letters received show what
those who have tried It think:
Edgar Cady, (ywatonna, Minn., says :
About m yer since my info became subject
to savere suffering' from rheumatism. Our
resort was to the Pat Kn.T.ait, which speedily
relieved her.
Charles Powell writes from the Bailors'
Home, London :
I had been afflicted three yean with neuralgia
andriejent spasms of the stomach. The doctors
at Westminster Hospital grave np my case in
despair. I tried your Path Killxr, and it gave
me immediate relief. I have retrained my
strength, and am now able to follow my usual
occupation.
Q. H. Walworth, Saco, Me., writes :
I experienced immediate relief from pain In
the side bv the nae nt ynnr Path Ktiun
E. York says:
I have used your Path Kiixzb for rheumatism.
and have received great benefit
Barton Seaman says :
Haye used Pad Enxn for thirty years,
and nave found it a nntrtfailing remedr for
rheumatism and lameness.
Mr. Burditt writes :
JA Z?,taitoJfrn relief In cases of rheranatisra.
Phil, JSUbert, Somerset, Pa., write a :
From actual use, I know your Pjjh Enxn
is the best medicine I can get
All druggists keep Pam Kiixxb. Its price
Is so low that it Is within the reach of, all,
and it will save many times its cost in doctors'
bins. H&tUf 50c and $1.00 a bottle.
PERRY DAVIS A SON, Proprietor,,
... .Providence, R. I.
sept dkw septa oct.
UBS
INDORSED BY
PHYSICIANS, CLERGYMEN, AN
THE AFFLICTED EVERYWHERE.
AND
THE GREAT E8T MEDICAL
TRIUMPH OF THE AGE.
8YMPTOMS OF A
TORPID LIVER.
IjOss of appetlte.Haasea.bowela ooatire,
Pain in theHead,with a dull eensation in
the back part, Fain tinder the shoulder
blade, fullneas after eating, with a diain?
olinaaon to exertion of body or mind.
Irritability of temper. Low apirita, Iioaa
of memory, with a feeling of haYing neg
lected some dutyearinesa, piaaineaa,
XTntterine: of the Heart. Dots before the
eyes, xellow Bkin. Headache, Beatleea-
nesa at night, highly colored urine.
IT THZSZ WASKPf 08 A1X TOHZXDZB,
SERIOUS DISEASES WILL SOON BE DEVELOPED.
TTJTT8 FILLS are especially adapted to
such eases.one dose erreotj snenaenanga
OBI
the
WfiJlake ea FtoeiCHhus the s:
item is
BiOeirlabml, and I
teAtlsieDth
Df caMYe vrni
ivn almBe. RMDlarataeU are D
rtttoeU are pre-
auoea.
Price S cents. Si U sirrmy Bt, N.T.
TUTT'S HAIR DYE.
Quay Haik or Whisk ma changed te a Glossy
Black by a single application of this Dtk. It
imports a natural color, acta Instantaneously.
Bold by Druggists, or sent by expreat on receipt of fl.
Office, 35 Murray St., Hew Torn.
M Dr. TtJTTS IlKCAl, sf Talaable IafMatM S.
ACMhl BMcIpti win a ulM fill ea-i
tttoj. 28deodawl
Ginger; Buchuj Man
drake, .Stillmgia, and
nanyof the best medi
cines Imown are com
bined in Parker's Ginger
Tonic, into a medicine
of such varied powers, as
K3
to snake it the greatest
Blood Purifier and the
, pestnalthStreagta
Boitertr Erer Used. I
' It cures Khcusmatacal,
Sleepleuness, & ditesrq
ef the Stomach, Bowels,
Parker's
ImOalsarm
Wi6vAIWneyv
IseauMlv flifttrentfrom
ittcrs, Guicer Essences
amd other Tonics, at it
tw nOk t imUn the aevtrbtoxisates. Hiscox
1UI i
iteaforwgmy aw. ,, Co.. cnemtits. . X.
jBs, awl ft 'JfT PeBerBIss,'-'
fcOOUJJ
DISCOVERY!
LOST
WAWHOOD RESTORED.
ATietimoTyon
itKtm wttirinaMBet causing rxmamf
f,nem
,"':f Vhlch ha wUl iend FBEK
iTwrnSflerers. address J.- JB. BEEVES,
43 Chatham W Y. -.i ' '
f Winter Goods
a
A NEW ROMANCE.
DEPlCTIilO THE TJ8ES OF THE
COTTOrl SEED.
Tbe Little 8ed lXMkvod Upesi and
Analyaed In Ita Vaurioaatsg-M from
tbe Tim It la Plsacael In the) Ground
until It Flower into Full Frultnge
Ita New Application.
Atlanta Constitution.
On the Train. January 1. Suppose
we start the new year with a romance?
All right, here eoes The Romance of
Cotton Seed I
In the Uriah and careless days of
slavery cotton was raised for its lint
alone. This was swept on me snowy
surface of the field and the rest was
wasted. Under the pressure of poverty
the South learned that it was just as
foolish to raise sheep for the fleece as
to raise a cotton stalk for lint, and that
the heavy seed from which the fibre
flowered was just as valuable as the
mutton from wnicn tne wool grew.
The story of the slow but sure way in
which the despised seed grew into ap
preciation is an interesting one, involv
ing enormous figures and illustrating
the progress that is being made in the
South
making crude oil from seed.
A vear or two aeo I wrote a letter
concerning certain mills that had been
established for the purpose of pressing
tbe oil out of cotton seed. The process
was then a rough one, and the oil pro
duced of inferior grade. The bulk of
seed from which the oil had been taken
was made into cakes and sold for stock
food or fertilizer. There were then
about 16 seed oil mills in the South.
Cotton seed was worth $6 a ton, and
the oil 30 cents a gallon.
There are now sixty-seven seea on
mills, and the price of cotton seed has
doubled, being now about twelve dol
lars a ton. This increase of six dollars
per ton for cotton seed adds about three
dollars to every bale of cotton raised
by farmers who sell their seed, as eacn
bale represents a half ton or seed. The
mills take thirty-five gallons of oil from
every ton and sell it at forty cents a
gallon. They thus take fourteen dol-
ars of wealth from each ton of seed,
and the dry bulk left is better food or
fertilizer than it was before the oil was
taken out. The sixty-seven mills work
ed up 180,000 tons last year, stripping
out 82,500,000 worth of oil that had pre
viously been wasted, and paying the
farmers nearly Sl.OOO.OOO more for the
seed than tbe same seed would have
brought three years ago. This business
is increasing very rapidly, new mills
being built every year.
REFINING THE CRUDE OIL.
But another step has been taken in
the handling of cotton, and mills have
been established for the purpose of re
fining cotton seed oil, and thus increas
ing its value. Oil that has been refined
is worth from C5 cents to SI a gallon,
while crude oil is worth only 50, so that
the refining process adds about 50 per
cent, and make3 the oil of one ton of
seed worth about $22, or one-fourth tbe
value of the cotton that the seed pro
duced. There are nine of these refineries
now m operation, une or tnem, in
Montgomery, refines 100 barrels or 5,000
jrallons a day, thus adding $1,250 every
day to the value of the product it han
dles. The other mills average perhaps
50 barrels a day each, making 500 bar
rels a day for the total thus creating a
value of over $6,000 every twenty-four
hours and adding it to a heretofore des
pised product This business is in
creasing rapidly. The profits are large,
and next year win see the renmng ca
pacity doubled perhaps. The mills now
running sell all they can make, and
could sell ten times as much. England
and France would take the product of
100 refineries at present prices. Indeed,
most of the mills sell their yearly pro
duct by contract A late suit developed
that an English company had deposited
$30,000 in Memphis as a bonus to se
cure the output of one oil refinery for
one season.
A SUBSTITUTE FOR LARD.
In the meantime the refiners are
creating a new market and a better de
mand for their on. it is used largely
as an illuminating oil, being: the best
for headlights and reflectors. It is used
as an adulteration of linseed oil, and is
pronounced by painters preferable to
Unseed itself, it is used almost entire-
for nar.kincr fish and especially sardines
in America. And it is used as a sub
stitute for lard in cooking. It is made
into what is called cotton butter, and
in this shape is rapidly supplanting
lard. Two pieces of steak, fried one
with oil and the other with lard cannot
be told apart For bread it is a perfect
substitute for lard, and for batter-
breads it is much better. In egg-bread
it fills the place of eggs. Intact in the
kitchen it is . cleanlier, healthier, and
better than lard, if the testimony of
housekeepers can be taken. It is m uch
cheaper. A pound of cotton butter
will do tbe cooking of a pound and a
half . of lard, and costs only thirteen
cents, while lard is worth, sixteen to
twenty cents. When a pan of steak
has been cooked with oil, the oil not
absorbed In the steak can be poured
back into the can and used again.being
just as clear and pure as before it was
put oyer the fire. If it was used en
tirely in the place of lard, we should
have to write the epitaph "Ded of a
FryinzPan" over departed southern
vizor, less frequently than before. This
oil has been tried in making. the light
est and best of cake, and found incom-
Darable. I asked Mr. J. . Boston.who
is interested in the sale of cotton but
ter, why it was, it being half as costly,
quite as good, and cleanlier than lard,
It did not supplant it. at once and en
tirely.
"Simply because there is a prejudice
, . , . . . t. i u
against cnanxing a uuBtuui wmuusu
fathers and mothers used, . It It is just
the same prejudice that caused people
to carry a pumpkin at one end of a
Stick and balance it with a rock at the
other fox years and years before they
discovered that they could put one
fiumpkin against another. However,
t Is .being introduced more rapidly
than: -we had dared to hope.
"If yon can sell all you refine,"
asked Mr. Boston the other day, "to
Europe, why do you labor to create a
demand in America? : . ; '
Simpiyl)ecause if we-open anew
market we make a largeTtiemand and
better toricea. We have ;inst shipped
1.000 barrels from the 'Montgomery re
finery at 65 cents a gallon. At 13 cents
a pound for cotton butter, every gallon
of oil will yield $1. For many reasons
we prefer a home market, and then we
Deiieve we ao a gooa uung m substitu
ting this perfectly clean, pore vegetable
ofl for lard in the kitchens of our
our homes. As-for the demand, I tell
on that if everv ton of cotton seed in
the South was pressed next year I could
sell the enure ou output oeioreme
15th of November. I could actually
have It sold Derore was maae.
' .' AN ENORMOUS WASTAGE. .
"Now let me show "what a wastage
there is. The cotton crop of last year
produced over 8JD00,000 tons of seed
it averaging about half a ton of seed to
every bale of cotton. Of this amount
only 180,000 tons, or about one-sixteenth,
was worked up. With the other 200,0C0
there was buned and wasted 9&000.000
gallons of oil, worth in its crude stare
(40 cents) sbU200,uoo, or in its rennea
state (65 cents) $62,700,000.
w s i ii i T . i
x 8 peas. auTiseaiy wnen a say wasted,
for it was literally wasted. The vast
amount of seed not put through the mills
was used for feed for stock or fertili
zers. But it is demonstrable that the
seed is better for either food or fertili
zers after tbe oil has been taken out
than before. The oil makes it too rich
for food and retards its decomposition
and assimilation as a fertilizer. A ton
of the meal, the bulk left after the oil
is taken out, is worth $18 dollars, or
nearly twice as much as a ton of seed.
Indeed, Mr. Boston tells me he exchan
ges on his farm two tons of seed for one
ton of meal. The hull of the seed is
used for fuel at the mills, and the ashes
from these hulls UjjerJfr '$25 a ton for
fertilizing uses., V-' ' 1
If the whole crop of cotton seed was
worked through the oil mills therefore,
it would add over $60,000,000 to the cot
ton crop and not deprive the land of one
pound of fertilizer or the cattle and
sheep of one pound of food. Indeed, it
would only assist the land and the stock
in digesting the food and make it more
agreeable to them, and yet we work up
only one-sixteenth of the seed.
One difficulty, of course, is the lack of
capital with which to build mills. This
is being rapidly eliminated. Each year
sees new- mills added, and the future
will show even brisker growth. I hear
that Mr. H. I. Kimball is going to es
tablish a refinery in Atlanta, and that
the former owner of Catoosa springs
will establish one in Dalton. No legit
imate enterprise in the South need ever
lack for capital again. Another difficul
ty, and quite a serious one, is that the
mills cannot buy enough seed to Keep
them busy the year through. The far
mers having been accustomed for years
to throw their seed back on the ground
or waste it altogether, still pursue that
plan. Of course mills established in
new localities win be supplied from
new territory, Even old mills find it
easier to buy seed every year. The rise
in the price tempts new farmers to sell,
and in a short time the mills will get all
the seed they want Then they will
run twelve months in the year instead
of six months as at present, and their
capacity will be practically doubled.
A STEP STILL FURTHER FORWARD.
Now, we have seen how, in the past
few years, we have taken from a ton of
cotton seed 35 gallons of oil, hitherto
wasted, worth first 30 and then 40 cents
a gallon ; and we have seen under this
process the cash value of a ton of cot
ton seed rise from $6 to $12. We have
seen further, a system of refining es
tablished by which this crude oil, sell
ing at 40 cents a gallon, has been made
worth Go cents to $1 a gallon. But we
should not stop even here.
The American Grocer shows that
salad oil and olive oil is selling in New
i ork from $2.50 to $4 a gallon. There
is not the slightest doubt that this is
our cotton seed oil, refined up to the
highest point and sold in fancy bottles
at fancy prices. Analysis shows this
the exports and imports show it and
Americans who have been to Europe
and Europeans who come here affirm
it Indeed, since the excellent qualities
of the cotton seed oil have been demon
strated, it is not denied by those who
sell it that the finer salad oils owe their
origin to this humblo and despised
seed.
Now, the man who sells this oil at
$4 a gallon gets more for the oil than
the lint from the same seed gives the
farmer for (allowing 20 per cent for
loss in refining) the oil would be worth
$112 per ton, while two bales of cotton
which came from the same ton of seed
would not bring over $90.
If the refiner itr Marseilles or Ant
werp can afford to send over here for
his crude oil, pay its way across the
ocean twice and its duty at New York
and still zet rich on it how much better
could he do by establishing his refinery
in the southern States. And this is
what it will come to. Had the cotton
seed been grown in New England,
every village would now have its re
finery, and would have re-established
in the making of "pure olive oil" a cute
industry that died with the decadence
of wooden nutmegs, and languished
when the demand for flannel-sausage
was diminished. There is not in the
whole range of nature, a more perfect
economy than is furnished in the hand
ling of cotton seed. It comes to the
mill bursting with an oil the quality of
which is incomparable and the demand
for which is exhanstless. The bulk of
the seed becomes more valuable as an
article of commerce and more useful
for its material purpose after this
wealth of oil has been pressed out In
its hulls it furnishes the fuel for the
machinery used to crush the balsam
from its body carries even into its
ashes all the valuable propertieaof its
hulls. Considering these things, and
the contempt in which this precious
seed has been held, isn't there a tinge
of romance in its development its ben
eficent adjustments and its perfect vin
dication.. H.W.G.
Death of an Aged Citizen of Arkansas
The Rope in IHisatssippU
.new Orleans, January 9. A spe
cial from Iiittle Rock, Ark- records the
death of Peter Markins, at his home in
Washington county, at the age of 111
years.
A special from Coffeeville, Miss.,
says: J. W. Fleming, who ras tried
at Tittsboro, Calhoun county, Friday,
and found guilty Saturday of the mur
der of Graham, in Tolabusha county,
in J une last, was sentenced to be hang
ed Alaich 3d.
The Decree Condemned,
Vienna, Jan. 9. The influential
Sress here condemn Emperor William's
ecree. The Standard's correspondent,
at 11.30 a. mn from Borne, denies the
truth of the telegram from Borne, pub
lished on Saturday by L,a Defenza, in
Paris, regarding Prince Bismarck's note
to the Quirenal Congress of Powers,
and the preparation of the Pone to flv
to Malta. A News' Paris dispatch says
La France describes the rescript of the
German JUmperor as a coup it etat,
New York Stock market.
New York, Jan. 911 a. m. The
stock market opened somewhat irregu
lar but m the mam to M per cent
higher than Saturday's closing prices.
xoe latter iui mouue ua uaio. xn
early dealings the market advanced M
to 1 per cent, the latter for Michigan
Central and .Northwest, but subse-
onentlv fell off M to l ner cent
r Beading leading me decline.
Tbe gentlemen who essayed to serenade Miss
L. a few erenlnjrs since, should have bad "'clear''
.Uroats, and their e&m would feare been better
appreciated. " Br. 3alls -couth synrp la the best
remedr extant for a "thick" or contested condi
tion of tbe throat and bronchial tubes, string in-
stana reuex.
Fire in TOlnaton.
Winston. N. C Jan. 9. Fire Iroke
out in Griffiths & Moores' store on Lib
erty street 'yesterday, and four
stores and the post-office, all wooden
buildings, were consumed. Several
small houses were torn down to pre
vent the fire from spreading further.
Loss not known.
. A European Sensation.
London. Jan. 9. A dispatch to the
Standard, from Berlin, says : Since the
Jt ariiamentary conflict 20 years ago so
deep and universal a sensation has
never been created as by the rescript
addressed to the Russian ministry.
The gravity of the situation is patent
o everybody
On the Shoal.
Washington. January 9. The sig
nal corps station at Key West, Florida,
reports the brig R. B. Gove, from Pen-
sacola to New Haven, with lumber,
taruok Slapjack shoal, Tortugas, on the
4th7 and filled full of water. She was
stripped by wreckers. It is doubtful if
any portion of the cargo can be saved.
DECLINE OF MAN.
Impotence of mind, limb, or Yital function, ner-
tous weakness, sexual debility, fcc, cured bj
Wells' Health Renewer. Si at druggists. Depot
J. H. McAden. Charlotte, N. C.
BXDFORD Al.TTM AWD ISOH RPRTHOR WVPnt Asm
Mass. The great tonic and alterative contains
lwlce as much Iron and flftr Mr cent, mora aJum-
tnum than any "alum and iron mass" known.
Just tbe thing for tbe "spring weakness" now so
general. 8old by all druggists of any standing,
Prices reduced one half.
If mail 1 tt
A CARD.
To all who are sufferlne from the errors and in
discretion of youtb, nervous weakness, early decay
rtSB Itf tnonhAAil J,A T as,411 SAtiit n MnlnA s-ttm anlll
vuo va muuuuvu, t.i 1 W lit o311U O lTJvlw Utah Will
cure you. FKBE of CHARGE. This great remedy
was discovered hy a missionary In South America.
Send a self-Addressed envelope tc the Bjsy.
JOSEPH T. INMAN, Station D, New York City.
Aa Extended Popularity. Each Tear Finds
Brown's Bronchial Troches" In new localities, In
rarlous parts of the world. For relieving coughs,
colds and throat dlsea-es, the Troches have been
proved reliable.
30 DAYS TRIAL
ALLOWED.
Pit's
imtn IS, 187S
WE WILL SEND, ON 30 DAYS' TRIAL,
13R.a DYE'S
Electro-Voltaic Appliances
TO MEKT
suffer In)? from Nervous Weaknesses, Gen
eral Uebility, loss of nerve force or vigor,
or any disease resultinj; from Abuses and Oth kt
Causes, or to any one afflicted with Rheuma
tism, Neuralgia, Paralysis, Spinal Difficulties,
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tures, and other Diseases of the Vital Organs.
Also women troubled with diseases peculiar to
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Speedy relief nnd complete restoration to
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Send at once for Illustrated Pamphlet, givir
all information free. Address,
VOLTAIC BUT CO., Marshall, Mich.
JnlylS
NOTICE.
PURSUANT to a decree of the Superior Court of
Mecklenburg, I win sell at Public Auction at tbe
court house In Charlotte, on
MONDAY, THE 27TH OF FEBRUARY, 1882,
(being the week of Superior Court,) that valuable
lot or parcel of land lying between tbe Intersection
f the north Carolina Railroad track and Trade
street, adjoining tbe P. M. Brown lots and others,
now known as tbe Butler property.
Resold because of purchaser at late sale falling
to comply.
Terms 1A easb: balance on 8 and 6 months
credit, with Interest Title reserved as security for
oaiance. u. BABxtiMUJStt,
dec24 d oaw tds Commissioner.
FRAMES.
A SPLENDID ASSOBTMENT
-OF
Photograph Frames,
Frame Mouldings, k,
AT
Van Ness' Gallery.
deel8 tf
SALE OF BONDS.
BY Virtue ot an order of tbe Superior Court of
Alamance county, in tbe case of a via King
and others aealnst W. J. and A. Murray and
others, I will offer for sale at the court house door
in ureensDore, H. c, at public auction, ror cash,
on Monday, tbe 6th day of February. 1882. at 12
o'clock M, eight 18) bonds of tbe county of Car
teret issued jreDroary vutn. 180U, eacn ror $5uu
doe on February 20th. 1880. to each of wblcb
bonds coupon 8 are attached for interest at 6 per
cent, from February 20th. 1875.
Parties desiring further information can address
my attorney, James a. uoja, Jisq., Greensboro,
H U J. A. MCUAUIjKI,
jan8 tds Receiver.
IvBtzs&itmxl.
X.B. Yabcx.
W. H Baxlxt,
VANCE & BAILEY,
. Attorneys and Counsellors
, CHARLOTTE, N. C.
Practice in Supreme Court of the United States,
supreme court oi Honn uaroima, reuerai
Courts, and counties of Mecklen
burg, Cabarrus, Union, Gas
. ton. Rowan and Da
vidson.' IV Offloe, two doors east of Independence
wquare. mayssw n
RO. D. GRAHAM,
ATTOBISTBTAT 1iA"vv.
IN the Stats and United States) Courts. Collee
ttona. Home and Foreign,, sottetted. Ao
tracts of Titles, Sarreys, &c, furnished for eom
rjensatfon. i- - - r
Omoir-R I, Corner Tt ; . Trfon tracts
uoaiioaa.Mf & , ujao.tt
RUBBERS!
WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SECOND
111.131)0 Over-Shoes.
WE STILL HAVE A HANDSOME LINE OF
Shaker Flannels, Blankets and Comfortables.
LADIES', GENTS' and MISSES
TO CLOSE CHEAP. ALSO, A LARGE LINE OF
DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED HOSIERY.
We will offer from this date our entire stock of
iters, Walking Jackets, Dolmans and Cloaks at Cost
CALL EARLY and
HARGRAVES
SEED OATS !
SEEDIOATS !
SEED OATS !
CORN !
CORN !
CORN r
FLOUR !
FLOUR !
FLOUR !
BAGGING AND TIES
We are agents for
THE WATT PLOW
And will sell tt lower than you can buy an otne
good plow. Full assortment always on band.
Call and see us before purchasing.
MAYER & ROSS.
de34
MM!!
LIU U U 11 LKJ
STOCK OF LADIES '
SECURE BARGAINS. 3
& WILHELM.
C. C. D. A.
-AND-
THAT-
NORTH CAROLINA
-HAS THE
LARGEST MUSIC IIOUSE
IN THE SOUTH.
The MM Music House
SELLS
CHICKERING & tONS,
KRANICH & BACH,
MATHCSHEK,
ARION,
SOUTHERN GEM
And other PIANOS.
MASON & HAMLIN,
SHONINGER,
PELODBET & CO.,
STERLING,
AND OTHER ORGANS.
THE ONLY HOUSE THAT SELLS 8TRICTLY
First-Class Instruments.
Ask me for prices If you want good work,
and you will never buy anything but the bett.
Address or call on,
II. McSMITII.
GREAT GERM DESTROYER.
DARBY'S
PROPHYLACTIC FLUID.
d SMALLPOX
p ERADICATED.
PITTING OK SMALL
POX Prevented.
Ulsters purified and
healed.
Gangrene prevented and
cured.
Dysentery cured.
Wounds healed rapidly.
Scurvey cured In short
ime.
Tetter dried up.
It Is perfectly harmless.
For More Throat It Is a
sure cure.
Conta elon destroi ed.
Sick booms purl ed and
made pleasan ft
Fevered and Sick Per
sons relieved and re
freshed by batbl g
with Prophylatlc fluid
added to the water.
Soft White Complexions
secured by Its use in
i
DIPTHERIA
Darning.
Impure Air made barm
PREVENTED
less and puriQed by
sprinkling Darby's
Fluid about
To purify the Breath
Cleanse the Teeth, It
can't be surpassed.
Catarrh relieved and
Cholera dissipated.
Ship Fever prevented by
its use.
In cases of death In ihe
house, It should alwnys
be used about the
corpse It will prevent
any unpleasant smell.
cured.
Erysipelas cured.
Burns relieved Instantly.
Scars orevented.
Removes all unpleasant
oaors.
An antidote for animal
or Vegetable Poison,
Stings, &c
Dangerous effiavtas of
sick rooms ana Hospi
tals removed by Its use.
Yellow Fever Eradicated.
In fact It Is tbe great
Disinfectant and Purifier,
PBZFABXD BT
J. II. ZEILIN & CO.,
Manufacturing Chemists, Sole Prcprletors.-dee4
Everybody
Has
Discovered
SCARLET
FEVER
CURED.
'5 1;
    

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