North Carolina Newspapers

    T II E-W'E EKL'Y LEDGE II . L
Saturday, - - - Sept. 14 1878.
There Is noble work to do,
Work for all.
Work of love mid beauty too, .
Woi k ot ood and duty too ;
'Everywhere, the earth, the air,
Tbeskv, the sea, the winds declare,
By all their voices grahd and rare,
. , There's work forj all.
Every life more noble grows "
.) .Through labor done -Labor
which true goodlier shows,
riborAvhieh no baseness knows ;
Labor which is meant to give "
(Jom1 to fel!ow-mcn who live
Liveof virtue, and believe 7
, There's work for all. "1
He makes effort ne'er in vain .
Wh e'er strives I , -.
To do good, and -tries to gain
The prize which sluggards ne'er obtain
The prize which only toiler win
Wl.n fi.rltt frrrivbr :mtl I'Ombat Sill.
And see that there are victories in
J,abor well done. - .
J.i-i'.e labors ne'er despise, -,
All are good-; . j I
,Oftrn grankiest' works arise
From legUinings small. 15e wise !
Proudly do whate'er may fall
To youVhanxls; obey the Vail'
Honor makes, and conquer all" . ,
: The ills of sloth. " .
. . -"
I-et us then all tlo the share
. i Tons given: . . '
Libors skies are always fair ,
When the laborers do and dare
When ihcy fear no frown or' spite,
iliit. e'er tolling for the right,
tlnod ihcy. do in i leaven's sight.
M - sAiKllrlnmplis wlu !
;Ty . 1 .11 . '
THE WAKDEREirs PKAYEIl.
I On a cold,' dreary evening in an
t ami). a sniajl boy, poorly clad, yet
cleanly and tidy, with a pack upon
hi. lrck, knocked at the door of an
old Qnaker in the town of S .
"Was," Mr. Lanainan at , home ?"
Yes? The hoy wished to sec him,
.and he was speedily'ushered into the
host's presence; t i
r nenu
Lanainan was one
of tl
wealthiest men in
the
county, am
1 "resident of the L
ro:td. The boy had
he -could obtain a
Valley Rail
come to see i
situation on the
road. He was an
orphan his
mother had been dead
ouly two
'months, a.id he was no'w a homeless
f wanderer. But .the lad was. too
email for the tilling of any plac
within tl e .Quaker's gift, aud he was
forced to -deny him. i Still no imea
'the looks of the boy, 'and said to
him : 1
"Thee may stop in my house to
'rdqht, and on the morrow I will
rive thee the names ot two or three
rood men in Philadelphia, to whom
ihee may; apply iwith assurance of
kind reception, at least, l am sorry
I have no emolovment for thee.
Later in the cvenincr the old
Quaker went the rounds of his spa
cious mansion, lantern in hand, as
was bis wont, to see that all was
safe, before -retiring for the night
He stonned and listened, and distin
guished the tones of a simple, earn-
est prayer, lie bent his ear nearer,
and heard these words from the
boys lips : .
me to help myself. Watch over me
as 1-watch over my own conduct ;
and care for, me as. my deeds shall
merit ! Bless the good irian in whose
house I am sheltered, arid spare him
long, that he may continue his
bounty to other suffering, and needy
ones. Amen P
Aud the Quaker responded another
amen as lie movied tin ; and as he
went his way, he meditated. The
lov hnd a trae idea of the'diities of
lite, and possessed a warm, grateful
heart "I verily think the lad will
be a. treasure to his employer I1' was
his eoncluding reflection.
When .morning came, the old
Quaker had changed his mind con
cerning his answer to the boy's ap
plication. 1
"Who learned thee to pray ?,f asked
r nenu Jj. 4 ,
'Ily mother, si iy' was the soil re
ply. And the rich brown eyes grew
inojst. . V
'And thee .will not forget thy
mothers counsels ?" 4. '
' I. cannot ; for. I know that my
success in life is dependent upon
lhem.v
"My boy, thee may stay here hi
my house; and very soon I will take
lin e to my ofhee. Uo npw and gel
thy breakfast."
' Friend L. was gathered . to the
spirit ".harvest soon afler the breaking
out of .the war ot the rebellion ; but
be.lived to see the poor boy he, had
adopted,, rise, step by step, until fi
nally he assumed the responsible
ofliee, which the failing guardian
could tio longer hold. And . to-day
then? is no man more honored and
respected by his . friends, and none
ioreufearacibyi gamblers and evil
minded speculatop in' irresponsible
stock, llian the orice poor Wanderer
--now President of one of the best
managed and .most productive Itail
ways.iii the United States.
Some remedial agents are very
powerful. A man in Arkansas was
killed last week by the heeling quali
ties of his mule. .
Subscribe to the Chapel Hill
L'EiKtKU, only $1.50 per annumrj
; AGRICULTURAL.
RUN-DOWN LANDS.
The Southern Agriculturist tljus
advocates the use of clover. It is
unfortunately a fact, however, that
on some lands clover seed will not
"take," and in order to insure success,
careful working. of tha soil and the
use of plaster aud lima are absolutely
necessary.
If you have an old worn out piece
of land, now is the time to rejuvenate
it. Clover seed is cheaper than ever
known in this market. At any price
and at all times it is, and ever will
be the cheapest fertilizer known to
agriculture. No land so poor but
what will grow ' clover, and the
longer it is grown the richer the sdil
becomes. ; slf the land is not designed
for auy other crop, plow, pulverize,
and alter sowing drag it with a brush
or go over it with a roller. Do not
be afraid to invest in seed or in suffi
cient quantity after it is bought. If
you are sowing especially to enrich
your land, sow clover if only for pas
ture, the more kinds the better the
stock will do. Your lands treated
thus, can be reclaimed, and you will
soon see that some magician has been
silently at work lor you.
SCRATCHES. Mix well 4 oz. oint
ment of rosin, 2 pz. turpentine, 1-2
oz. each origanum1, tine ground ver
iligris and tincture of iodine, with
one and halt pounds mutton suet.
Wa.sh the foot clean with castile soap
and soft water, when dry anoint
once a day - . .
' - Fousmzii. toisten:a tablespoon
ful of pulverized alum and a teaspoon
pulverized saltpetre, pull the tongue
fbrward, place the spoon as far back
n the mouth as possible. Repeat
Leverv other oay ioriceyerat uays,
feed carefully and exercise gently
daily. - " ,
Clover and Gkass. September
has proved with us the' best month
for sowipg clover and grass on up-1
lands ons bottom-lands they will do
as' well as if sown in early spring.
For grass, make the land rich with
nitrogenous manures especially for
clover, with phosphatic and mineral
manures. Never stint seed overdo
rather than underdo the matter
failure often begins, jjiist here.'
Turnips. Where turnips have
been drilled, thin out to a -stand as
soon as possible, and give good cul
tivation first with a deep running
plough; subseqnentljr with sweep
keeping the drill clean with the hoe.
The turnip has a very short season
in which to develop, and it needs
all the help it can get.
DOMESTIC. v ..
To Clean Cooking Utensils.
Mustv coffee-Dots and tea-pots may
w m .
be cleaned and sweetened by putting
a good quantity of wood ashes into
. , ' .j mi? t. ij i..
vuem anu niuur up witu uum wuiei.
Set on the stove to heat gradually
till the water boils. Let it boil. a
8hqrt time, then set it aside to cool,
when the inside should be faithfully
washed and scrubbed in hot soap suds,
using a small brush that every spot
.may bereached, then scald two or
three times, and wipe till well dried.
It must be a desperate case if the
vessels are Dot fbund perfectly sweet
and clean if this advice is strictly fol
lowed. Pots and pans or plates that
have been used for baking and have
grown rancid may be cleansed in
the same way. Put the plates into
a pan with wood ashes and cold wa
ter; and nroceed as above stated. If
no wood ashes can be had, take soda.
If cooks would clean their pie-plates
ami bakinu dishes after this fashion
after using, tliey would keep sweet
all the time.
When to Eat Fruit. Theprov-
m . it T.I
erh ot the Spanish nas it : . r run is
golden in the morning, silver at
noon, but lead at night." Americans
lo not seem to have heard of this
proverb, nor to have made, one from
their own experience. Mostly they
eat fruit at night, and hence have
not the sovereign idea of it that
they would if they had eaten it at
the proper times. They eat it as a
dessert at dinner. This may be the
most proper time to eat dried fruits,
but it is not the time to eat the juicy
ones. The Spanish people learn
their proverb from eating the very
juicy fruits, like oranges, lnose
should be eaten m the morning, a
little before breakfast not later
than noom .Early in the day they
will, if eaten, prove to be the best
possible medicine for the billious,
diseases common in this country.
Bruises or Sores. Boil smart
weed iuchamberlye, add a little soft
soap, wabh twice a day.
In cold
weather Jry with a hot
or cover with a cloth.
brick or
Throat Distemper. Grate fine
a small green wild turnip, or if dry,
give a heaping spoonful, mixed with
bran or oats. It never fails. Good
for cough also.
Costiveness. Half a pint of lard
melted in a pint of new milk; given
warm.
THE TERRORISM OF TRAMPS.
The dreadful stories of tramps
which are so frequent this summer,
are causing much uneasiness. A
New York lawyer writes to the
Springfield Republican as follows:
" I see by the paper that a shocking
outrage has been committed near
Brattleboro, Vt., by a tramp, and a
letter from that place confirms the
statement. When I was there a few
weeks ago, I found that it was con
sidered necessary that young ladies
should go armed. I met one carry
ing a policeman's club-garnished
with two saw-blades. Others carry
pistols. I have no reason to suppose
that this state of affairs is peculiar
to Vermont. I should certainly
never have sent my family there to
summer had I supposed it possible
such a state of brigandage could
exist. Apparently the honor of our
wives and daughters is no safer there
than in Sicily. There was a time
when the people of New England
were too high spirited to tolerate
such a condition of things. If they
have sunk i so low as to prefer that
their ; women should be ravished
rather than spend' a little money in
putting down these tramp ruffians,
it is time that decent families from
other States should find some safer
place in which to pass their sum
mers. It is perfectly easy to estab
lish a mounted and armed; police
which shall patrol the highways and
pake such crimes impossible. I do
not suppose the money a single per
son spends in a place is' .of much im
portance to it. But the whole
amount that is spent in aJtoWn like
Brattleboro by summer visitors is
considerable. For one, I shall never
send my' family there again unless
some sufficient measurs are taken to
abate this intolerable nuisance. And
there are many who agree with me."
A correspondent for the Hartford
Courant proposes the following rem
edies: u Plainly by an organization
in every town, in every villagej which
shall render escape impossible, and
punishment .certain. Suppose the
town of West Hartford, for instance,
each house were provided with rok
ets ready for tiring, each district
with a beacon ready for lighting;
suppose at the ringing of certain
bells every man should step, well
armed, into the roads and fields es
cape would be nearly impossible,.
Northern Paper. i
A Yankee Ku-Klux-Klan 1 ...
ARSENIC IN FOOD.
. Ritter points out that, although
magenta, by the arsenic process, is no
longer used for coloring confectionery
and liquors, arsenic is still iouna in
these 'articles of daily comsumption.
It finds aii entrance into them by the
glucose or starch sugar so often em
ployed. Glucose is formed j by the
action of sulphuric acid upon starch;
and the acid, having been made from
arsenical nvrites. contains traces of
arsenic. The source of the mischief
is thus apparent. As the brewers of
ijermany employ mue maiv ami
large quantities "of glucose, the beer
produced by them is also naoie to
be -a.ftected with! arsenic Arsenic
having been found in bread, its pres
ence there was also trace to the bak
ing powder, which has been prepared
from sulphuric acid manufactured
from arsenical pyrites. JfcLven spring
water, has been found to be contami
nated by the arsenical pyrites,
through which the water percolated.
While we are on the topic it may be
vvell to caution purchasers! against
the use of. any wall paper which has
not been, chemically analyzed. JNo
color is now sate the blues, reds,
browns, often contain arsenic, on ac
count of the cheapness of the mate
rial.- JZxcJianre. J
i a
Silver Sprinirs, Fla., is one. of the
f the Smith. It
bubbles uri in a basin nealv 100 feet
deep and about an acre in extent.
4 i
sending from it a deep stream 60 to
100 feet wideband extending 6 or 8
miles to the Oclawha River.j In the
spring itself sixty boats may lie at
anchor quite a fleet. The spring
thus forms a natural inward port, to
which three steainers run regularly
from the St. John's, making cldse
connection with the ocean steamers'
at iPilatka'. f The clearness of the
water is. truly wonderful. It seems
even more transparent than air. You
see the bottom eighty leet below the
bottom of your boat, the exact from
the smallest pebble,1 the outline and
color of the leaf that sunk, and all the
prismatic colors of the" rainbow are
reflected. Large fish swim in it, every
scale visible and every movement
distinctly seen. If you go over the
spring in a boat you will see the? fis
sures in the rock from which the
river rushes upward like an Inverted
cataract.
A wife asked her husband for a
new dress. He replied, "Times are
so hard, my dear so hard I can
hardly keep my nose above water
whereupon she retorted, "You could
keep your nose above water easy
enough if you'd a mind to, but the
trouble is that you keep it too much
above brandy."
). ? . ..
Advertise in the Ledger.
HIE WEEKLY LEDGER,
CHAPEL HILL, X. ,C.
Per annum,
$1 50.
Six months,
$1 00.
Advertisements appearing in the
Ledger will reach the farmers of
Alamance, Chatham, Wake, Orange
and other counties, and is therefore
a good advertising medium.
(JST Advertisements will bo in
serted in these columns on as liberal
terms as iii any first class paper.
BTho Lkdgek's circulation is
increasing ! rapidly, and bids fair to
. i I ; ' ' ' -have
as large ' circulation as any
country newspaper iii. the State.
The Fall Season will soon open,
, . ' ..'
and every , farmer should keep up
with the cotton, tobacco and pro-
' - ' i
duco markets. Tlie Lbdoeu will
furnish the markets of Raleigh, Dur.
ham, Hillsboro, Cljapel Hill, &c.
'. i . H -: ' ' - r '
i -. . . .
Arrangements , are being made for
weekly commuuicatlons from TRal'
eigh and other points.
The Ledgeu will use whatever in-
'' ' .' : .! t' - , '
flucner it 'may command to have a
Railroad built to Chapel Hill, and
an Experimental Farm connected
with the University.
The cohimns of the) Ledger will
I: '. k .'
be devoteil to Literature, Agricul-
ture, Latest News, Original Corres
pondents, Markets, &c, and will
avoid political issues as much as pos-
sible, though claiming the right to
object, to obnoxious men and meas-
ures.
Then, fellow-citizens, subscribe to
the Ledger and aid ns in building
up a good newspaper.
Office opposite the store of
J. W. Carr, and next door tjo L. J.
Weaver.
'm in.i.ir i
m on vr and 'di?
HEAD Q U
Fir the Best Goods at the Lowest
Everybody Treated Ajike, at
y., rt., , . mt Frch un. II
r
The T.nr st and Moiit Complete
'-I" : " . ' .
f
HHmbuk Kdgf.ig. anrt Trimmings;.
"Hvcrylhiiig himI Anything yoitj want, at
-
A LA HQ K STOCK OF ,
BLANK BOOKS,
KN VELOPES, PAPER, '
Pl: PENS, INK, PENCILS
and COPY BOOKS '
At
Rirbee Druff Store.
PERFUMERY, TOILET AND
SHAVING SOAPS, . v
'; : ; . . . ' :
HAIR, NAIL, TOOTH, PAINT,
BLACKING and WHITE
-:--:p WASH BRUSHES rP.
iii great variety, at 1
Baiee Drug Store.
gM ITU N. BKICKilO'JSE & CO.,
WIIOIJKSALK UEAI.EKS IK
JL5ot mtcl Hi1ioc?jn,
-i ' . - ;
34 & 3G COMMERCE STREET,
) NQRFPLK, VA.
J-y K N T.I S T R Y . -
S U KGEO N DENTIST
' CHAPEL HILL, N. C.
B"Ofllee over Barbee's Drue Store,
apl 18-tf , -
J A M E S SOU T II G A T E ,
C ' j- ' ..' .. .:-" ' V.' ' ;. :i -GENERAL
INSURANCE AGENT.
' - DURHAM, N. C. '
Large lines of Insuranee placed it
short notice in first class Companies.
Term policies on Dwellings and Farm
Property; a speciality.- !
J. M
A LEX A N DER
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
CHAPKL 1IILX, N. C. !
Collections in Orange and ChatrhunVI
speciality. i
Remittances mide promptl'.. ! '
i'vk won state;
toat make men gubat.
-
A RTE R Sj
MOX'; Main U., burl,lln
mm,
MON'S, 3Inin St., Durham,
: '" ... ;. ! ..-
'0N st.;
of Goods iii the County, at !
n j'
Stock
tG AM MOW'S, Main t., Duriiatt
i I' . . 'A I
In Endsrieftt ' ,! ; 1.
j MIMIJX ,0,11111 .fi, William.
l'rieefl lrauml to please, at
GAMMON'S, Main St., Ihirfcta.
THK SKWINO MACHINE OIL
at lhirbees
Driiiz Stored li wid
to be superior. to any
" in t
ie Market.
Try .
- (
5
FRESH LEMONS AND OKAXCi
., ..; : a. ,,
at - .,m
BARBEK'S DRUO STORt
ITie Best 5 cent cigar in the SUte.
At
Barbce's Drug Store, i
- ,! : , hi
kSeek no Airtliqr, j
For better can't be found.
J U S T R E Cj 13 I V E D J
. J:. 'v 'If P ,
FORTY BirSHELslop GKOO
PEAS.
Jy 13-tf
D. McCAULtf
T O NvHJ'O K I A. L
ART EMPORICM!
: .: !i ! . I'
I ' ' .,.'. A
fjl H O M A S .-D If - ;N o Ajv
I HAS FITTED UP HU i 1
BARBER SALOON
T.'.i.i'il ctnrt. -IB "I
most '.improved $tyle, and will W J
to . see his customers any tua j
guarantees good jworki ' , '
l 7I1k v HILL,
Hair Cuttiii":, -
'Shampooing,. -
''!. . '.'.Li
Re has a boot-black alwnys in wrv
anee. Givejiim a call, j; .
anl is-tr
i I.
Tjl OR S A IE . ;i
JL. I I nf
. About 30,000 briek. -Alo two "
horse wagons; Enquire of .
;T,' I; I .?. V. I3AKB.
my 25-tf I I Chapel IlHir,
"TT7" ! P . C A T E S , JjLV
convey passengers to ana jn-t-at
short notice, ht any time of U
niijht. Orders lor express, aiul w i
promptly attended to. : l-I
PRESCRIPTIONS carefully
. . . i.i
poiinded at ali hoiirs of day or
Barbee'8 Drug Store. , f
The Purest Drugs and Best Min'
used. i I : '
Vou can get a 'Pistol that : vi
& purgiar: prodigiously J" u '
or $3.50, at ;
' '....' ' r
liarbee-s VvS
    

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