North Carolina Newspapers

    VOL. XLIII
Get Rid of Tan,
Sanburn and Freckle*
by using HAGAN'S
Magnolia^K
Balm.
Acta inflandy. Stop* the burning.
Clean your complexion of Tan and
Blemishes. You cannot know how
good it ia until you try it. Thous
ands of women say it ia beft of all
beautifiers and heeds Sunburn
quickest Don't be without it a
day longer. Get a bottle now. At
your Druggist or by mail diredt
75 cents tor either color. White.
Pink, Rove-Red.
SAMPLE FREE.
LYON MFG. CO., 40 So. Sth St.. Brooklyn, H.Y.
EUREKA
Spring Water
FROM
EUREKA SPRING,
Graham, N. C.
A valuable mineral spring 2
has been discovered by W. H. T
Ausley on his place in Graham. 2
It was noticed that it brought 1
health to the users oi the water, J
and upon being analysed it was 2
found to be a water strong in 2
mineral properties and -good *
for stomach and blood troubles. 2
Physicians who have seen the £
analysis and what it does, f
recommend its use. 2
Analysis and testimonials
will bo furnished upon request.
Why buy expensive mineral
waters from a distance, when
there is a good water recom
mended by physicians right at
home? For further informa
tion and or the water, if you
desire if apply to the under
signed.
W. H. AUSLEY.
BLANK
BOOKS
Journals, Ledgers,
Day Books,
lime Books,
Counter Books,
Tally Books,
Order Books,
Large Books,
Small Books,
Pocket Memo.,
Vest Pocket .Memo.,
,um
&c„ &c.
For.Sale At
The Gleaner
Printing Office
Graham, N..C
English Spavin Linimnet re
moves Hard, Soft and Calloused
Lumps and Blemishes from horses;
also Blood Spavins, Curbs, Splints,
Sweeney, Ring Bone, Stiflus,
Sprains, Swollen Throats, Coughs,
etc. Save >6O by use of one bot.
tie. A wonderful Blemish Cure.
Sold by Graham Drug Company
adv
This year the Kaiaer will be lucky
if he eats his Chriatmaa dinner in
Berlin, or at all.
The motto ox the U-boat de
destroyer, You shall not see me
If I see you firat."
Break your Cold or LaGrippe with
few dotes of 666.
The grand jury has recommend
ed that impeaenment proceedings
be begun against llayor Smith of
Philadelphia. Smith is under
bond to answer for complicity in
a murder committed in Philadel
phia some weeks ago.
Te Care a Celd la On Day.
Ilk* Laxative Bromo Quinine
fablets. AU druggists refund the
money U It talis to ear*. B. W.
Grove's signature 1s on each bos.
V eenta adv.
: ' ' . I
i There's No Mail i
Order House
That Can Beat
Your Prices. i
Let Folks Know It
THE ALAMANCE GLEANER
•'- : . .
MACHINERY FOR 2ND
DPIAFT IN OPERATION
PRESIDENT WILBON WRITES
FOREWOR DTO REGULATIONS
. ' FOR SECOND CALL.
MAY BE DIME IN FEBRUARY
Regulations and Questions Forwarded
to Local Board*—Must be Complete
Inventory of QualHloatlons of Eseh
—Registrant.
Washington.— President Wilson tor
mally put the new machinery for the
carrying the selective draft bill into
operation with the publication Of the
foreword he has written to the regulat
ions under which the second call will
be made. The regulations themMlves
and he questlonalres which more than
9,000,040 registrants will be required
to fill out sre being forwarded to local
boards, but have not yet been made
public. *■
War Department officials estimate
that the whole process can be com
pleted within 60 days. This meaas
that no second call will be made upon
the draft forces before the middle of
next February, as the period of classi
fication will not begin until December
15th.
The president describes the new
plan of dividing all registered men not
already mobilised into five classes,
subject to military service by classes,
as being intended to produce "a more
perfect organization of our man
power."
"The selective principle must be
scarrled to its logical conclusion," the
Preaident said, and he added that
there must be made a complete lnven-
Tory of the Qualifications of each
registrant In order to determine "the
place in the military, industrial or
agricultural ranks of the nation In
which his experience and training can
best be made to serve the common
good."
The inquiry projected in the ques
tional™ will go deep into the qualifi
cation of each of nearly 10,000,000 men.
The success of the plan and Its comple
tion within the estimated time rests
absolutely upon the wholehearted sap
port given by the people especially by
the doctors and lawyers of each com
munity.
REVOLUTION IN RUSSIA
ON VERGE OF COLLAPSE
Troops Loysl to Kerensky Are March
ing to Capital.
London.—The Bolshevik! revolution
In PetrogTad is reported to be ap
approachlng collapse. Regiments loyal
to Premier Kerensky are marching on
the capital ,and lighting la trader way
In the city, according to reports reach
ing here from Petrograd. An organ
ization which haa adopted the name
of AU-Rasslan committee for saving
the country and the revolution an
nounced that the defeat of the Bolshe
vikl movement was a matter only of
days or hours.
The town of Tsarkoe-Selo. IS mllea
south of Petrograd, where former Em
peror Nicholas lived much of the time,
is said to have been captured by loyal
forces, after which the rebela retired
to Petrograd in disorderly mobs.
Paris. —A wireless dispatch from
Haparanda In Sweden, near the Fin
nish border, aays that Premier Keren
sky has 100,000 man supporting him.
The wireless message, which escap
ed the censorship of the Bolshevik! by
being sent from Hapamnda, says Pre
mier Kerensky left Petrograd Tues
day for general headquarters, being
concealed In the bottom of an aato
raoblle ambulance. It is understood
he was accompanied by Qsaeral Alex
ia®, former and
by Foreign Minister Terestchenko.
Premier Kerensky now has 200,000
men devoted to him," the dispatch con
tinues. "It Is believed hls coins to
Moscow to reestablish his government
there and march on Petrograd. This
possibly may be unnecessary as the
latest news from Petregrad says a bat
tle Is going on In th* streets-and that
the Cossacks bars Joined the mlstmal
lsts and are mastering the maximal
ists."
TO STANDARI2E BREAD
AND SRING DOWN PRICKS
Washington Definite steps to stan
dardise bread and lower its price were
taken when President Wilson leaned
a proclamation placing all bakeries
nader government license Lecenber 10 j
and subjecting them to food adminis
tration rules prescribing Ingredients
and weights of loaves. Prices will not
be fixed, but with the standard ieaion
It is expected that natural competition
and simplification ot distribution will
force down psicee.
Fancy breads will be eliminated and
the multitude ot sizes now produced
will be reduced to conform with stan
dard Ingredients. The weights will be
one pound, one and a half, two and
four pounds. The loaves will have a
crease in the middle to permit their
sale in halves. In baking only three
pounds of sugar will be allowed for a
barrel of flour. Instead of an average
of six pounds now used, and two
pounds of vegetable on shortening
must be used Instead of six poands of
lard or ell. The food administration
expects to save 100,000,000 pounds tt
sugar and the same amount ot lard.
Beliefia Mi Hears
Distressing Kidney and Bladder
Disease relieved in six hours b/
the "NEW ORBAT SOUTH AMER
ICAN KIDNEY CURB." It is a
treat surprise on account of its
exceeding oromptoeee In relieving
pain ID bladder, kianeys and back.
In male or female. Relieves reten
tion of wster almost immediately.
If yon want quick relief and euro
this is ths remedy. Bold by Ora
ham Drug Co, »dr.
GRAHAM, N. C„ THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15,1917
JAMES H. COLLINS
M HQ|
- fl IB
James H. Collins, for 1S years a
widely knewn writer «n baslneea sub
jects, has charge of ths toed adminis
tration'a publicity hsifdlsd through
trads paper* .
WIS 9,400,0011 SIHMERS
TOTAL SUBSCRIPTIONS .Tb SEC
OND LIBERTY LOAN AMOUNT
ED* TO 94617,M2405.
Minimum Ovsrsubscrlbsd By 64 Par
Cent and Only *3*3,000,000 Lss»
Than *5,000,000#00 Maximum Fixed
, by the Trsssury Department.
Washington.—Americans responded
to the call for a second war liberty
loan by subscribing *1,617,112,100, an
ever-subecrfptlon by 64 perssMofttae
*3,000,000,000 asked, and oatr **SI,WO,-
000 lass than the $5,000,000,000 maxi
mum fixed by the treasury.
Tabulations completed eleren days
after the close of the natlon-wlds bend
selling campaign, showed that ersry
federal reserve district exceeded its
quota and *9,400,000 persons subscrib
ed in the big war financing operation
which Secretary MaAdoo described as
the greatest sver attempted by any
government.
Half of the oversubscribed ssa
will be accepted, making the actual
total of bonds to be Issasd *1,808,711,-
160. Ninety-nine psr csnt of the sab'
scrlbers will receive the amount for
which they bargained, all subscrip
tions for *60,000 or lsss being allotted
In full, and those above that amount
being pared down In varying proper-,
tlons, ranging from a (0 per cent al-
lowsaoe on subscriptions btCVMI
I SO,OOO and SIOO,OOO to 40 psr cent
(or the largest single subecrlption at
$60,000,000.
"The success of the second tTtmrty
tow, like that of the lint, It a dis
tinct triumph for the people ot the
United States," said Secretary Mc-
Adoo, announcing the loan results. "It
not only demonstrated their ability,
patriotism and resources but augurs
the certain success of any future loan*
that may be offered by the govern
ment.
No Loan In January.
The secretary added a denial ' ot
reports that the third loan would: be
solicited In January, 1918. "In view
of the large over-subscription of the
second liberty loan," he said, "I am
Clad to state that this will not be nec
essary." It has been generally under
stood that the third loan would be
eougbt probably In late February or
early March next year. M
The New York federal r nosers dis
trict subscribed nearly three-111ss as
much ha* the second district on the
Hat, Chicago. The resnMr In eSBh 41s-1
trlct follow:
New York .*
Chicago WMIMIO
Cleveland NfIMIW
Boaton tlt.ttOfiM
Philadelphia SIMMJM
Saa Francisco MMTUN
Richmond 201.tU.M0
St. Louis 1««455,780|
Kansas City M0,1»,760 |
Minneapolis lM.tt7.mt
Atlanta M.m,7(0
Dallas 77.MMM
SUFFRAGE WINS IN NSW YORK I
OTHK RELECTION RETURN*
j
The outstanding feature of the elec
tions la the United Stater was the
apparent SSSUSSd victory tor woman
suffrage In New York state by » ma
jority of approximately M.OOO.
Two states, Ohio and New Mextoo,
I voted on prohibiten.
FIFTEEN YEARS FOR
EVADING THE DRAFT
Cam v Dodge, lowa.—VMtosa years
at hard labor In a federal penitentiary
was the sentence given Otto Waago
rln, of SL Paal, Minn., a draft law
evader. In the tret conviction by gen
eral court martial at this caatoament.
• X O. Stivers, of Casenovls. 18., a 1
member of Company A. UIU Infan
try, has been sentenced to frvs yean
to the federal prieen for theft of Hi, It
alao was made known.
CERTAIN CURB POB CROUP
Mrs. Rose Mlddleton of Green
ville, 111, has had experience in the
treatment of this disease. She
says, "when my children were
small my son hurt croup frequently.
Chamberlain's Couffti Remedy al
ways broke up these attacks Imme
diately, and I wsi never
It In the house. I have taken It
myself for coughs and colds with
good results.
Hlnilcnberg Is 70. Should know
better, too.
IHIKAPPEALS
i FIMEIIN
__
PR EM DENT IB OPPOSED TC
PEACE UNTIL GERMANY IS
■EATEN.
WE WIST STAND TOGETHER
"i
AppssSm to Werklagmsn far Co epsrs-
Uen In Cswdust of War—Victory
Cannot be Wen Unless All Paetions
Ars UnMad.
Buffalo, N. T.—President Wilson, in
a forceful addreas here before ths
Americas Federation of Labor, ap
pealed to the worklngmen of the Unl
tad States for co-operation in the con
dast of the was, mada.lt emphatically
clear tbsit ha opposes peace unll this
war agalsat- Germany Is won.
The prestdsnt declared that his
heart was with the "feeling of the
panltots, bui that my mind has a con
fniiK {or OMB."
"I want peace, but I know how to
•at-it aad theyvde sot," he declared.
Col. X. M House, head of the
American delegation to the allied war
conference, the president said, had
been sent to take part In a conference
ae ta how the war was to be won, and
he knows, as I know, that that is the
way to g«t peace it you want it for
mors than a few minutes
The 460 delegates to the conven
tion and the several thousand persons
admitted to the hall to hear the presi
dent speak, arose and applauded this
declaration with a tremendous burst of
cheers. Another demonstration of ap
proval cams when he said:
"Ws must stand together, night and
day, until this Job is finished.''
For Foreign Consumption.
The president, While devoting his
address- to problems for the people of
the United States, laid emphasis upon
the brooded phases of the world eon
flttt in a way that seeded to lndl-
oate that his speech was pbssibly in
tended as a massags to the> people of
Germany, of Austrl* aad of Russia, as
well as of ths United States. He de
clared Ills belief that were it not for
the Pan-Germans, the spirit of freedom
would find "as fine a welcome in the
hsartsof Germans as It can End la any
other heart.
"Power," he saM, "cannot be used
with concentrated forces against free
peoples, If It is to be used by free
people."
Speaking, probably of Austria, Mr.
Wilson referred to the Intimations of
anxiety for peace that had come,
"from one of the central powers' 'aad
declared that K meant "that he peo
ple of Chat central power knew that
If the war end* aa It stands, they will
fa effect, themselves be vasaals of Oer
many, notwithstanding • * • that they
do not Wttit In thslr pride and proper
■plrlt of nationality to be absorbed and
dominated."
Of It a—la, he eaid that ha vu
amaiad that aome groans In that
country could inppose that "any re
form plans- la the inter eat of the peo
ple can live In the presence' of a Oar
may powerful enough ta undermine
or uraittimw them by Intrigue or
f&rea.*
"Ftetuous aa the dreamers of Rus
sia." ware these persons In this ooun
try, he declared emphatically, who sap
pose that "the free Industry and en
terprise of tha world' can eoatlnne If
the pan-Oerman plan Is achieved and
tha German power fastened upon the
world.
Germany Started War.
Tha President directly aaeertaff that
Oermany had started the war and
said hs would leave confirmation of
this statement to tha verdict of hli
tory. He letaried to Germany'*
growth to a "place in tha snn" and
asked why she waa not satisfied when
aha gained that poatthm. In answer,
he deacrtbdd tha On limn govern
ment's mathoda of coatroUtar tha
competition of itr Industries and as
sarted that "aIT tie while there waa
friar Mrta* lta thought la Its dreams
for tha future, a political control
which would enable It la tha long
ran to doariaate the labor and the
Industry of tha world.
Mr. Wilson cited Is this connection
the Berlla-t«-Bacdad railway which he
■aid. "waa constructed to run the
threat of fore* dawn the flank of the
Industrial undertakings of half a doz
en other coaatrtaa, ao that when Car
man competition came in It wauld
not ha resisted too far - • • because
there waa alwaya tha poealMlity of
getting Oertaaa aalw Into- the heart
of that country quicker than aay oth
er armies could gat there."
Bumming up. he said that Oermany
Is determined that the political pawei
of tha world shall beloag to her.
METHODItTS TO RAItK
ORKAT QAMPAION FUND
Philadelphia—Tb« Methodist Ep(»
copal boards of horn* and foreign mis
■ions at a Joint conference approved
a reootnmendaUom that a campaign bs
Inaugurated to raise ftO .000,000 In tb
next fl»e years. Forty millions art
to be raised by each board to spread
Met bod Is a to all corners of the earth
A boat tm clerrmea from all parte 01
the coentry Including the entire boar
of 10 bishops attended the confer en ee
Yo« Can Care Tbst Bacfcufcs.
Psln aJoag the beck, dlsstene. beadecbs
sod cenasral laocoor. U«t e peckasr of
Mothsr U ray's AustsalU Lmi. lbs pleasant
root and herb sore for JCMney, Madder
and orlnery troubles. Wbee yon (eel all
mo down, died, week and without eaerfy
use this markablx oosabtoaUoa f nature,
herbs and ruots. As a regulator It bes n.
equal. Mothsr o«ey*s Australian* l*ef is
MM by Drnaalata or sent by meil for Wou
Wesnplw sent frse. Address, The Mother
Gray Co, Le HOT. It. t.
It they go on exiling «raiH duken
there wont be anybody left to go
with in Ruaaia.
ITALIANS HOW
PAIVE RIVER LINE
AUSTRO-GERMANS MIGHTY AO
VANCE HAS NOW BEEN
CHECKED.
HEAVY SHELLING IN POOOOESS
Itallsns Ars Entrenched en Wsst Bsnk
of River, Which Is From One-Half
to One Mile Wide—Reports Fsvor
sbls.
Italian Headquarters in Northern
Italy.—The Italians are holding the
Austro-Oerman advance on the Plave
ltne. Reports from the frost were fa
vorable.
Heavy ahalling is In progress all
along the new front.
The Itallana are entrenched back of
the west bank of the Plave river and
the Austro-German force now Is tak
ing the place of the advanced guard
on the east bank. Ths strip of water
between the opposing lines Is about
half a mile, widening at some points
to a mile.
An observer Just bsck from a tour
along ths llns told the correspondent
that the cannonade had become con
tinuous. The Austrlans sre using 6-
Inch guns, not yet having brought up
many of their heaviest pieces. The
enemy is turning his flfe against the
high campanllle bell towers of small
village! fringing, the western bsnk to
prevent the Italian artillery from us
ing thsm ss observation posts. The
Italian artillery reply Is spirited from
a considerable number of guns that
they succeeded In bringing back from
the old front.
The battle front has two main ssc
tors. The lower extends from Keltre
to the ses snd ths uppsr from Fsltrs
westward.
LLOYD GEORGBTS FAITH IN
FINAL OUTCOME IS FIRM
"Single Front, Bingis Army, Single
Nstlen, Is Program Requisite
for Vlotory."
Paris.—"A single front, a single
army, a alagle nation—that is the pro
gram requisite for futurs victory,"
said Premier Palnleve at a luncheon
la honor of David Lloyd George, the
British prims minister, who has just
returned from the Italian war ions,
and Slgnor Barenlnl, Italian minister
of eduoatlon. "If after 10 months ol
war, after all the lessons ths war was
taught us, ths allies were not capabls
of that sacred international union,
,then in* spite of their sacrifices they
would not be worthy of victory."
I In dlicunlng the manner of aceom
pllshmem of thla fusion, to which th*
allies have long aaplred, M. Palnlev*
said; " .
! "The enemlea' alliance realised
unity of effort by brutal discipline,
one ft the peoples among them ha»
{ lng mastered the others snd rendered
them serviceable. But we are faee
peoples. We do not admit of subjeo
tion to other peoples Hi tisM of war.
That independence is at the saais
time a source iff strength and wsalS
nee*, of strength because of thetr ca
; paclty for realstanee which Is un
known to subject people*, aad weak
ness because It renders more difficult
co-ordination of military operation*.
To reconcile thl* Independence with
the need for unity of direction which
'ls required to achieve an efficacious
policy will be the work of the
lnter-allled war committee or of the
superior war council Just created by
the alllea."
Premier Lloyd George, alluding to
a centralised direction of the allied
efforts, said:
"Unfortunately we did not have
time to consult the United States or
Raaala before creating thla council.
The Italian disaster necessitated ac
ton without delay to repelr It.
"But, In order to aasure the com
plete success of thl* great experiment,
which I believe la eaeentlal to the vic
tory of our cause, It will be neceeeary
that all our great alllea be repre
sented la the deliberations. I am
persuaded thet we shall obtain the
.consent of these two great countries,
aad their co-operation.**
RUSSIAN FACTIONS REPORTED
IN BLOODV ENCOUNTER
Stockholm.—A bloody encounter haa
taken place near Gatcnlna between
•oldlers from the front heeded by Pre
mler Kerenaky aad Bolsbevlkl forces
from Petrograd, according to advlrea
which have reached Ire Nelson Morris,
the American minister, from reliable
eeareea.
In Fintaad the travelers are report
ed ea saying the situation is desper
ate Anarchy la on the Increase aad
acta of violence and even murder.
Bakeriee Under License System.
Washington - All bakeriea In the
United State*, including those of ho
tels, restauranta snd cluba aad except
tag oaly the smaller maker of bread
who uaea leaa than ten barrel* of
flour per month, are required to come
under federal license after December
16 by a proclamation Issued by Presi
dent Wilson. All "persons. Arms. cor.
porations and aaeoclatlona who menu*
fart ore tor sale breed in any form,
eahe, packers. biscuits, pastry or oth
er bakery products" ere directed to
take out licenses.
MRS. P. O. STPCIIELL TELLS
HOW SHE CURED HER HON
OP A COLD.
"When my son Ellis was siclc with
a cold laat winter f gave him
Chamberlain's Cough Remedy, ft
helped him at once and quickly
broke up lila cold," write* Mrs.
P. O. Stuchell, Homer City. Pa. This
remedy haa been In uae for many
year*. Its good qualities have
been fully proven by many fhoua
anda of people. It la pleasant and
aafe to take.
BRI6. GEN. F. J. KERNAN.
Brig. Gen. Frsnols J. Ksman Is now
ssslstsnt chief of s^ff.
KERENSKY FLEES THE CIPITIIL
GOVERNMENT FORCES ARE COM
PELLED TO SURRENDER WIN
TER PALACE.
Workmen's and Soldlsrs' Delegates srs
In Complsts Control of Pstrogrsd.
Womsn's Battalion Dsfsndlng Pal
ace Is Forced to Surrsndsr.
Petrograd Government forces hold
ing tbe winter palace were compelled
to capitulate under the fire of the
cruiser Aurora and ths cannon of ths
St. Peter and St. Paul fortress across
the Neva river. The woman's battal
ion which had been defending tbe win
ter palace surrsndsred.
The workman'* and soldier*' dele
sates are In complete control ol the
cit jr.
Premier Kerenakr was reported at
Lnga, 86 mile* southwest of Petro
grad.
After the government forces had
been driven into the winter palace, the
place waa beeleged and a lively Are
of machine guns and rlflss began. The
cruiser Aurora, which waa moored
at the Nlcolal bridge, moved up with
in range, firing ahrapnel. Meanwhile
the guna of the St. Peter and St. Paul
fortreai opened tiro.
There waa spsemodlc firing In other
part a of the oity, but the workmen'!
and soldiers' troopa took every meant
to protect cllaena, who ware offered to
their quartera. The brldgea and the
Nevesky.Prospekt, which were In the
hand* of the government forcaa wart
captured and held during the night by
the workmen'a and aoldlara' troopa.
Waahlngton.—Discouragement felt
here over the newa of the overthrow of
the Kerensky government at Petro
frad la tampered by hope that the ex
treme radical* who have aeiaed the
capital may not be able to extend
their control over the army or any
conatderable part of the country. How
ever, It 1* feared that much blood may
t>e ahed and the nation further demor
allied before any power ariie* above
the turmoil itrong enough to control
the altuatlon.
COTTON REPORT SHOWS
7,150,254 BALES GINNED
Waahlngton—Cotton ginned prior to
November I amounted to 7,150,254
bales, counting round as half bains, and
Including 132.170 round bales and
•7,3*1 bales of sea Island, the census
bureau announced.
Last year 8,623,693 bales were
ginned prior to November 1, Including
164.141 round bales and *0,727 balsa of
aea island.
Olnnlngs by statea this year were:
Alabama, 306,106; Aricona, 2,766;
Arkanaaa. 495,977; California, 11,614;
Florida. 34,176; Georgia. 1,296,604;
Louisiana, 422.066; Mississippi, 49J,
632; Missouri. 19,616; North Carolina,
277; 963; Oklahoma, 523,367; South
Carolina, 713.613; Tennessee, 61,966;
Texas, 2,392,611; Virginia, 3,472; all
other states, 1,911.
Olnnlngs of sea island by states;
Florida. 26,006; Georgia, 299.640, aad
South Carolina, 1.63 J.
NEGRO SOLOICRS MAKE
TROUBLE IN MONTGOMERY
Montgomery, Ala. —Quirk work by
the military police, aided by Major
John C. Fulton, commander of the
Tenth training battalion (negroes),
probably prevented aerloua trouble
when some of the negro soldiers be
came excited over the report that one
of their comradea had been captured
by a mob and was being taken out
to be lynched. For a time It appear
ed there was danger of a race riot, but
the military police prevented.
SUFFRAGISTS END HUNGER
STRIKE OF 72 HOURS
Washington.—Miss Alice Panl. head
of Uie woman's party, and Miss Ilose
Wlnslow, hunger-striking In the dls
tiirt jail hospital, were fed by the Jail
authorltlea. Liquid food was given
them through rubber tubes, breaking
a fast of something over 72 hours
Whether force was employed may
be always a matter of dispute. Dr
J. A. Gannon. the Jail physician, sal*
It was not and that both women took
the nourishment without protest.
WANTED I
Ladies or men with rigs or auto
mobiles to represent a Southern
Company. Those' with selling ex
perience preferred, tho* not neces
aary. Past selling proposition.
Brand new article. Excellent pay
for huatlera. Address Mr. Greg
ory, 160 4th Ave. N. Nashville,
Tenn.
MM RELIEVED
MUM COM
A PERMANENT INTER-ALLIED
MILITARY COMMITTEE HAS
BEEN APPOINTED.
GENERAL DUZ SUCCEEDS HIM
Rstsd ■« on* of the Ablest Men In the
Italian Army—Alllc* Aroused to
Necasalty of Closest Union In Nam
ing Commlttss.
Italian Army Headquarters The
conference of British, French and Ital
ian representatives has resulted In the
creation of a permanent Interallied
military committee. New leadership
for the Italian army has been provided.
General Cadorna, who has been in
supremo command of the Italian army
since the beginning of (he war, has
been given a place on the new com
mittee. *
General Diaz has been appointed
first In command with General Badog
lk> second and General Grandlno third.
General Foch, chief of staff ot the
French war ministry, and Oeneral Wil
son. sub-chief of the British general
staff, will serve on the interallied com
mittee with Oeneral Cadorna.
Among military officers the decision
of the allies to create a permanent
military committee has caused great
satisfaction. It Is accepted as evident
that the allies have awakened to the
necessity for the closest union of the
whole length of the western front for
the epolltlcal snd military conduct of
the war.
_ Oeneral Diaz Is rated as one of the
ablest Italian military leaders. For
years he wss connected with the gen
eral staff. He took part In the Libyan
war, serving ss a colonel and was
wounded so severely that he asked to
be wrapped In a flag, feeling that death
wss at hand.
Osneral Badogllo Is a northerner. Ia
the war he has been In command ot
a brigade of BersegUerl, whose herolo
deeds have done much to decrease the
gravity of the disaster.
RUSSIAN WORKMEN'S-SOLDIERS*
COUNCIL MAY SEEK ARMISTICI
Armistice of Thrse Months Is Maxk>
msllst Lssdsrs's Proposal.
Pstrograd.—"We plan to offer as
Immediate armistice ot three months,
during which elected representatives
from all natlonk and not. the diplo
mats, are to settle the questions of
peace," said Nikolai Lenine, the Max
imalist leader. In a speech before the
workmen's and soldiers' congress.
"We offer these terms," M. Lenine
sdded, "but we sere willing to consid
sr any proposals for peace, no matter
from which side. We offer a just
peace, but will not accept unjust
terms."
The congress of soldiers' and Stork
men's delegates appealed to the Rus
sian army to stand firm and to protect
the recrlutlon against Imperialistic
attempts until the new government
had obtained a democratic peace.
The proclamation further declares
that the soldiers' and workmens con
gress will propose an armistice to
come Into force at once on all fronts."
The congress of the soldiers' and
workmen's delegates In Its proclama
tion announces that It has taken over
governmental authority and aays:
"We appeal to the soldiers In the
trenches to be vigilant snd Arm. The
congress expects the revolutionary
army will protect the revolution
against all Imperialist attempts until
the new government has obtained a
democratic peace which It will pro
pose directly to all ths peoples.
"The new government will take
adequate measures to sssure to ths
army all necessaries snd by energetic
requisitions from the upper classes H
will also ameliorate the econofoic sit
uation of soldiers' families:
"The power of the soldiers' aad
workmen's delegates will sssure the
free return of sll prlvste, state snd
ecclesiastical lends to the pasanta'
committees. • • • It will guarantee
to ail nationalities Inhabiting Rus
sia ths rlgbt of tlielr sons to organise
their own future." ..
CAMPAIGN IS STARTED TO
MAKE METROPOLIS "DRY"
Now York.—A campaign to make
New York City "dry" through women's
votes Is under way. Opponenta of ths
liquor traffic announced few days ago
that at New Year's eve wstch services
In New York chcrcbes, women quali
fied as voters by the ratification of
the state suffrage amendment In last
Tuesday's election will slun petitions
calling (or a referenedum on local
option neit April.
ATTITUDE OF UNITED STATES
WILL NOT SE CHANGED
Washington—Russia's latest upheav
al will not change the attitude of the
American government toward meas-
I ores under way for the relief of eco
nomic condition* in the demoralized
| country This statement, applying par
t tlcularly to contraots placed with
1 money borrowed from the United
Stales for vast quantities of shoes and
clothing 'or the Civilian popuuiatlon
wss ths only authorized comment at
the state edepartment.
POH A WKRK STOMACH.
AH a general rule all you need
to do is to adopt a diet suited to
your age and occupation ana to
keep your bowel* regular. When
you find that you have eaten too
much and when constipated, take
one of Chamberlain's Tablets.
The province of Ontario is not
entirely under the spell of the blue
law*. The courts there have de
cided that it is lawful for drug
gists to sell soap on Sunday.
NO. 41
t .S. A .• JTIM
GRAHAM CHURCH DIRECTOR*
Graham Baptist Church—Rev. W. ' *
R. Davis, Pastor.
Preaching every first and thira a
Sundays at 11.00 a. m. and 7.00 |\
Sunday School every Sunday at
9.46 a. m. A. P. Williams SupC
Prayer meeting every Tuesday at 1
7.30 p. m.
Graham Christian Church—N. Main
Street-Rev. J. V. Truitt.
Preaching services overy Sec- • !
oud and bourih Sundays, at 1L«» fl
a. m.
Sunday School every Sunday at
10.00 a, m.—B. L. Henderson. Supers
intendent.
New Providence Christian Church
-North Main Street, near Depot- ,
Kev. J. G. Truitt, Pastor. Preach
ing every Second and Fourth Sun- : 'M
da v nights at 8.00 o'clock.
Sunday School every Sunday at
8.5 a. m.—J. A. Bayliff, Buperin
tendent.
Christian Endeavor Prayer Meet
ing every Thursday night at 7.46.
o'clock.
i. e pds—Worth of Graham Pub- ; J
Pastor"* 0 Fleming Martin,
Preaching Ist,'Snd and 3rd Sun
days.
.A und ' y Bcho °' every Sunday at M
10.00 a. m.—Belle Zachary, Superin- '
tendent
Methodist Episcopal South-cor.
Main and Maple St„ k. E. My ere 1
Pastor.
Preaching every Sunday at ILM-- ill
a. m. and at 7.10 p. m.
Sunday School every Sunday at
•.46 a. m.—W. B. Green, Supt.
M. P. Church—N. Main Street.
Bev. R. S. Troxler, Pastor,
Preaching first and third Suo- %
ll a. m. and s p. m. j
Sunday School every Sunday at
9.48 a. m.— J. L. Amick, Supt.
Presbyterian-Wst "Elm Street— .
Ke „ v - /• M. McConneU, pastor.
Sunday School every Sunday at
i?i": m.—Lynn B. Williamson, Su
perintendent.
r P £ ,b 7, terl * n (Travora Chapel)- J
J. W. Clegg, pastor.
Preaching every Second and
Fourth Sundays at 7.10 p. m.
Sunday Bchool every Sunday at
MO p. m.—J. Harvey White, Su
perintendent.
Oneida—Sunday School every .
Sunday at JJO n. m.-J. V. Pome
roy, Superintendent |
PROFESSIONAL OARDB 1
E. C. DERBY
n Civil Engineer.
GRAHAM, N. C.
Well—l Baaßef "-miais n r.
BURLINGTON, N. C,
Beeai IS. 1M NaMestf Beak MMhs
'Pheae IN
JOHN J. HENDERSON
Attorncyat-Law .
GRAHAM, N. C.
IHllss ever ItaltaMl auk M Almmm
J\ S. O OOK,
Attorney-at-Law,
(jRAHAM, .... . || # o,
Ofllce Patterson Building
Second Floor. . , . , .
UK. WILLS.IMG,JR. J
. . . DENTIST . . .
Iraham, . - - - North Carellaa
OFFICE in .SIMMONS BUILDING |
-ACOB A. LONQ. t. ELKIK LOBS
LONG * LONG,
a.ttornejre end Counselors a* Law |
GRAHAM, K. C.
i jw
JOH N H. VERNON \
Attorney and CiißHlir-aUbw
PONBS—(»ee eu BssMeace MT |
Bublinuton, N. O.
Dr. J. J. Barefoot
OPPICE
Up Stairs in Goley Building.
Leave messages at Hayes Drug 
Co.'a, 'phone «?, residence 'phone
282. Office hourse 2to 4 p. m.
and by appointment
DR. G. EUGENE HOLT 1
Osteopathic PhyaletM
XI. n u lIIH.I National Baakk BM|
BURLINGTON, N C.
Stomach and Nervous diseases a
Specially. 'Phones, Office 306,—res
idence, 362 J.
LIVES OF CHRISTIAN MINISTIftS
Thin book, entitled aa above,
eoutaiiiH over 200 memoirs of Min
i«u*r» iii the Christian Church
with historical references. An
interesting volume—nicely print
ed and bound. Price per copy:
cloth, 92.00; gilt top, $2.60. By
mail MJC extra. Orders may be
sent to
P. J. Kbbnodlb,
1012 S. Marshall St., ?
Richmond, Va.
Orders may be left at this office.
|lX»—Dr. E. Detchon's Anti-Diu
retic may be worth more to yon
—more to you than SIOO if yoa
have a child who soils the bed
ding from Incontinence of water £
during sleep. Cures old and young
, alike. It arrests the trouble at
, once. SI.OO. Sold by Graham Drug
Company. adv,
Suggestions from Gen. Pershing
. that soldiers should be taught to
■ shoot before being sent to France ,
. seem to be regarded by Americans
- aa embodying a startling and orig
inal idea,
    

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