North Carolina Newspapers

    The Carolina Watchman.
VOL XVn.-THIED SEEIES
SALISBURY, H. C, DECEMBER 24, 1885.
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THE GREAT EXTERNAL REMEDY!
KLUTTZ'S
TOBACCO L1NIENT
FOB
RHEUMATISM, G0lT,l NEU
RALGIA, SPRAINS, BRUISES,
PAINS, ACHES, AC.
-Combining the wonderful curative virtue of To
bacco, with other -approved rubefacients, uiukibg
murvelous compouud for the. relief of huuiau sul
fertng .tw- RELIEF GUARANTEE.
ITS ACTION IS WONDERFUL..
Suffer no longer. Be humbugged with quack
ur-alls no longer. Tobacco hi Nature's Ureal
Rciaedy. H has been ted In a crude way trom
ihrt daraof Sir Walter Kalelgh down, and has work
ad Dkioy t marvelous cure, and saved many a valu
able Ufe. lathe "iobaceo Liniment" Its trtues
ar aclenCltlcally extr.icted, cotublaed with other
abl medical agenta, aud conlldeutly offered 10
ht ytlfellc, not as a cure-all, but as a safe, powerful
ffeetlT External Kemedy, applicable wher
ever (here U pain to be relieved.
It largo bottles at only 25 cents. For
ale by all Druggists. Akfur it, and in
sist upon having it. Don't be put off with
Worthless substitutes. Try it and yoa will
be thankful for haying had it brought to
Jour 'attention.
THEO. P. KLUTTZ ft CO.,
Wholesale Druggists, Proprietors,
(30:3m Sxusbuky, N. C.
COME QUICK!
DELAYS ARE DANGEROUS ! !
J, SL McCUBBINS
has just returned from the Northern cities
. with the
LARGEST ft BEST SELECTED
Stock (f Goods that he has ever offered to
the public; consisting of Dry Goods, Gro
ceries, Hats, Boots and Shoes, Sole Leather,
Crockery and Guecns-ware, Clothinu, Pro
vision Wood and Willow ware, ice.
Also a full line of
FERTILIZE
R8
of the very best .brands, viz :
BAKER'S Well Tried FOR
WHEAT
MEURYMAJTS A. D. Bone "
WALKER'S Ground Bone 4k
NATURAL Guano Just from
.Grchillo,
Guano on
and supposed the only Natural
the market.
- (Jo and get Testimonials and if you want
to save money, don't forget to call on him
before bu viii either Goods or Fertilizers.
Salisbury. Get. 1, I880, 23:tf
DEBILITY IX ADULTS 13 often
eaused by worms. The chunge from cliild
to 11 1 a 11 hood ia not sufficient to rid the
system of this awful pliigue. Shriiiers
Indian Vermifuge will expel thvm aiid
restoi v hrjlJi aud a bright jeoiuplexivUb
Enochyille, N. C,
Dec. 15th,. 1885.
Dear Watchman:
By request of friends, I furnish you
the following bit of news.
At a call session of the . L. Synod
of North Carolina, held in Mt. Pleas
ant, N. C, for the purpose of considering-
the interests of North Carolina
College, it was decided to try to raise
an endowment fund of $30,000 during
the next five years. ftOOO, to be
raised withfn the bounds of Synod.
Rev. W. Kimball, the great church
builder of Synod, was unanimously
chosen as the agent to raise said fund.
$15,000 to be raised in the church at
large. Rev. P. W. E. Peschau of
Wilmington, N. C. was chosen as agent
io raise this amount. A good choice.
These agents are to have a salary, and
their work is to begin with 1886. They
are under the supervision of a committee
of five, viz: Revs. J. A. Linn, C. A.
Rose, B. S. Brown, Hon. H. H. Mc
Alister, and Jesse W. Miller, Esq.
If any men can raise an endowment
ior North Carolina College, those cho
sen will certainly do it.
If lu,000 is not subscribed in nve
yeare
then all subscriptions will be
null and void.
This is-a grand and noble effort on
the part of the North Carolina Synod,
which numbers about 5,000 communi
cant members. It will require lauda
ble sacrifices and liberal giving to
the move a success. W. A. L.
Handling the Lariat
AX ART IN WHICH THE MONTANA COW
PUNCHERS TAKE GREAT PRIDE.
I noticed a variety of lariats with a
round-up party, nearly all of yvhick
were "made of the very best quality of
hemp, twisted sovery tight that it was
almost impossible untwist the strands.
Others were made of sinew cords, and
were braded very neatly, the ends or
lassoing parts being greased so as to
slip easily. Their lassos are about sixty
or sixty-five feet long, one-third of
which forms the noose, and wheu
swinging it, it is grasped a little above
the loop, so as to prevent it from slip
ping until launched through the air.
The lasso is swung over the head and
left shoulder, and back over the right
shoulder, a peculiar turn of the wrist
as it begins to return keeping the loop
wide open. Whennying through the
air the noose takes a slightly oval form,
but remains open, and settles quietly
around the object aimed at. Mciiaigan
exhibited to me the modus operandi of
handling the rope, and some of his
feats performed in my presence were
not only executed with marvelous pre
cision, but were also beautiful to look
at. The model cowboy is certainly an
expert in his profession, perhaps the
best rider and lassoist in the whole
northwest. WJiat Slosson is to billiards
McGaiaan is to his profession.
One afternoon, wnile loafing around
the camp fire on the Musselshell,
McGaigan and I got to talking about
the skill he had acquired in throwing
cattle, and I had little difficulty per
M.
suading him to let me into the secrets
of his wonderful dexterity and actually
showing me some of the fine points of
he business. Mounting our bronchos
we rode off through the sage brush and
out uponthe open ptairie, where num
berless cattle were peacetully munch
ing the luxuriant buffalo grass. My
friend had his best lariat tastened t
the pommel of the saddle, and first
showed me many fancy shots, throwing
th lasso from or to any point, over
either shoulder, behimLor in front
He caught a tremendous bull by the
horns, which looked up m surprise and
started off like a steam engine, but the
pony bestrode by the cow boy, planted
his fore feet firmly in the ground and
checked Mr. Bull in his mad career be
fore the latter got well started. The
enraged steer went round and round in
a circle at a 2:40 gait, the pony acting
as a perfect pivot and turning slowly
around with him; but it was.no use;
the bull was a prisoner, and would have
remained so had not McOaigan taken
pity on him and passed the wonderful
ring down the line, upon which the
rope leaped from around the horns and
fell to the ground.
McGaigan remarked that it was no
credit to catch a bull by the horns, for
he cannot be thrown by them, and is
simply held a prisoner, but the skill of
throwing a lasso is to pitcn tne noose
just in front of an animal when he is
going at full gallop, so that at the next
step he treads into it. He tried it on
111111.1 r
another Dull wnue notn 01 our pomes
were jumping along on a dead run
The old fellow was going about as fast
as we were, but the fatal loop shot
through the air at a tangent, and fell,
wide open, just in front of him on the
ground. The left forefoot plunged
square into the circle, tne rope was
tightened with a sudden jerk, and the
steer rolled over in the dust, as cleverly
caught as anything I ever saw. The
broncho, too, understood his part of the
business thoroughly, for he bore at the
right moment in the opposite direction,
else he might have been thrown instead
of the bull, to which he was much in
ferior in weight
McOaigan also caught great big steers
F tlloping past at an angle by any leg
named. Not once was his judgment
at fault. The noose, whizzing through
the air in every direction, went As true
. a 1 Hi 1 ( m
to the mark as a outlet snot trom a
riue. -
a
I was much taken with the free and
easy sort of life experienced by this
round-up party, and enjoyed the trip
and camping out experience so hugely
that I was almost tempted to give up
the profession of a scribe and become a
cowbov mvself. but thomrht better of
it next day, and, although 1 had tots ot
y r - C7
un and enjoyment, I concluded that
cowboy life must have its dark as well
as its briidit, sunnv side.-r-.iloMfroMi
Letter.
dosing Up.
December finds the planter with
comparatively little to do on the farm,
except to close up the little odd jobs
that come ot the season, such as getting
av n L. 1 1 v .1 t 1 inn fur -fiwil lioillltirf Hi
itter to be used as needed, completing
shelters for stock and such like thmgs.
The corn and cotton are all secured, or
should be at once; the tobacco is all in
barn and nicely cured, and only awaits
damp weather for stripping; potatoes
and apples have been cellared Or are
ready to resort preparatory to cellaring,
and the hogs to be fatted are already in
pen, and receiving liberal rations of
corn and collards, preparatory to the
slaughter. All is snug and secure all
over the farm, with little work and
plenty of good things to enjoy, and
liigh anticipations of the near holidays.
The stock farmer, however, I and
poulterer has more to do. There is the
daily feeding and oversight of the stock.
Rat ions must be liberal and regular to
he trough and rack. Milch cows need
special attention. Hay alone, at this
season, will not yield much milk.
They must have bran or meal. Even
one quart a day to each cow will be
found to make a quart difference in the
yield of milk, but three or four quarts
,-,i. ,U fKom ThoJuum
It llUltl 1IUU I llv 11IOU 111 LHL111 I 11V OI11.1.L I
should be fed daily in a sheltered sunnv
place, and protected from the rams and
snows when tney come, uut give
them free range in dry fields in open
weather.
The poulterer must be on the alert
for eesrs all this month and next. He
must feed well, and. keep the hens
warm and contented, and they will lay.
In general, give them the run of the
farm now. Ihey will pick insects,
vii i i ii i i
grass, pebbles, seeas, ana all these go
far to keep them m health and laying.
Feed corn at night and bone meal at
noon; green leaves, fruit, &c., often.
Do not erowd the stock, and keep the
species as much apart as possible. At
any rate, restrain quarreling and con
tention, and have nests enough for the
laying stock. Do not omit the bone jf
you want eggs. Break and beat fine
the bones from the kitchen, and if
possible have the pure fresh ground for
them. retersburu Messewier.
A Host of Tyrants.
A unique document was submitted to
the henate Wednesday. It was a me
morial from a Brooklyn man, urging
that the government shall establish a
newspaper at every first-class postoffice
in the United States, to be published at
public expense and for public use; such
papers to be for the publication, free, of
all advertisements of the people, and of
the utterances and opinions of people
who may choose to avail themselves of
the columns of the government news
papers. The memorialist sets forth
that the only tyranny existing in this
country is the tyranny of the press
that the press is a powerful dynasty.
and unless this despotism is checked
and overthrown it will subvert the gov
ernment, lhe only power', says the
memorialist, competent to grapple with
the tyrannical press is the government
and he urges that government papers
1 e established. The memorial covers
thirty-six pages of legal cap paper, and
the opinions and grievances of the me
morialists are set forth in the minutest
detail. The scheme is a brilliant one.
and of course will be adopted by the
government with alacrity. The idea
of the tvranny of the press is excellent
What American newspaper man would
have known he was a tyrant but for
this Brooklyn discoverer? Xeics-Ob-
server.
Names of Multitude.
little girl was near the picture of UW1' T1 Pfple may, and do, almost
rfiWnf ahi'tia wUn ahA 0ni;mwi Jfany day abandon their idolized 'hero,
a nu
"See what a flock of ships!" We cor
J . 1 . -
rected her by saying that a flock of
ships was called a fleet, and a fleet of
sheep was called a flock. And here we
may add, for the benefit of the foreign
er who is mastering the intricacies of
our language in respect of names of
multitude, that a flock of girls is called
a becy, and a bevy of wolves is called a
iMick. and a pack of thieves is called a
qatKi. and a gang of angels is called a
host, and a host of porpoises is called a
shoal, and a shoal of buffaloes is called
a troop, and a troop of partridges is
called a covey, and a covey of beauties
is called a galaxy, and a galaxy of ruf-
nans is called a horde, and a horde of
1 llJ"f. , 1
rubbish is called a heap, and a heap of
oxen is called a drove, and a drove of
blackguards is called a mob, and a mob
of whales is called a school, and a school
of worshippers is called a congregation,
and a cougregation'of engineers is call-
ed a corps, ana a corps ot robbers
called a band, and a mind of locusts
called a swarm, and a swarm of people
is called a crowd, and a crowd of gen-
tlefolks is called elite, and the elite
the city's thieves and rascals are called
roujhs, and a miscellaneous crowd
city folks is called the community
jmblic, accordingly as they are spoken
of bv the religious community or the
secular public
Some of the Heroes.
Joaquin millkr on butler, shkrmax,
AC.
Literary Life
A lady from Boston, who is connec
ted with a mission in one of the low
districts of New Orleans told me this
anecdote.
With three rows of little hall nude
black people before her at the mission.
and in hand, she began:
iv iiu who me 111 at umnr 1
Twentv or thirtv little black hands
shot un in the air. and twentr or thir-
... X . -T ' ....
v""c TTrT t .
uWho was the strongest man?1
'Sampson."
"Who wa the wisest man?"
"Solomon."
"Who was the wickedest man?"
"Ben Butler!"
This feeling has become anl will re
main a tradition; a name that the old
black "Mamas will use to frighten
their little ones with. And thus it may
be that this man will be remembered
when the rest of us are forgotten.
Two little acts, out of my many
1 , set down here The elegant
home of the present clerk of the Su
preme Court has been forcibly entered
and searched from garret to garden
three times. The fourth, time the sol
diers came the indignant Creole took
his little son with him and went to
General Butler, and handing him a re
ceipt said: "Sir, it is useless to send
your soldiers or any one else to search
my house for treasure. Ihis you will
18 a receipt for my silver and treas-
UHT5. At 13 BlliUCU UV liJC V l ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 tl J 1 1 i" I
.. - i"
of the Spanish man-of-war which left
this city the day you entered it.
General Buttler assured the Creole,
1 m 1 1
in the presence ot his son, above re
ferred to, that his house would not
again be disturbed.
One more, the oldest United States
Senator now living, and a celebrated
historian, took his treasures, and, by
the help of a black servant, buried them
in his garden. They were soon on their
way North along with a ship load of
pianos, silverware and libraries. In
fact the most famous and best loved
preacher of the South, a man whose
word like that of the venerable henator
or the clerk of the Supreme Court re
ferred to, is beyond all possible ques
tion, told me that nearly
taronf v v!irsi
after the pillage of New Orleans bv
Butler, he found many
of his books on
the second hand stalls in Boston, and
some of them were voluntarily return
ed to him. Stick a pin
here, and think of this man, Shermsin,
Sheridan, beggars at the
beginning
ot the war; princes atter. it they are
true soldiers Where did their colossal
fortunes come from? But they are not
i . i At 1 1
soldiers, as Laesar. Alexander and so
on, who led to battle sword in hand
The modern 'hero has no tiste for
the front. There is not a single scar
among all the "heroes" I have named.
Butler is no doubt brave enough in
speech, the bravest as well as well as
best of the famous lot, no doubt, i et
none of them every really smelled
powder, and each has made his fame
by invading and burning Christian
homes and made his fortune by plun
dering them.
lou reproach me for opening up
these old wounds ! I want to get the
iron out; I want to let the light m
And then, not till then will these
wounds heal. Let the truth be told of
such men. and let them keep their
places.
The South is, has been and shall be,
because God made it. God made the
South, and man cannot unmake it
The man who says he knows no South,
no North, no hast, no W est, is simply
a demagogue or fool.
Ml -hp ate Ot
The people have cone after talse gods
before. The worship of gold is new
religion, put it is none 4he less lalse
The hand that struck down the golden
calf in the desert lifted up the greatest
race that h&i been, and never was a
Moses so needed among men as now.
As for this other form of idolatry it
1 1 ! 1 1
is none tne less perilous oecause less
I 1 i. .-.Jl-i..... H I I . , II',.... 111. ..II. IAW . . .1 .'I
UUI UlttJll JIJ I J tu IIWJOIUJI uuutuci uuu
less worthy.
State Horticultural Society.
The Raleigh correspondent of the
Charleston News & Courier writes that
paper under recent date:
The btate rlorticuitural society met
here several evenings ago and heard
some remarks on fruit growing in N,
C. Jhis has been successful the past
1 Ti t J 1 i
season ana attention nas oeen given
the general subject of fruit culture in
its variovs branches by persons who
I evidently mean to devote money and
.1 1" 1 X. " i. . . , ., X - . S51 1
time to waai is cerium speeaiiy De
come a great source of wealth. Strange
to say, North Carolina produces, in the
3-E- I' a ar
extreme eastern and western part of
her domain the choices apples grown
anywhere. In the counties west of
the Blue Ridge and in Hyde county,
l!'
is near the sea, tnis rruu is found in re
is markable profusion and perfection.
The reports as to apples, peaches and
pears were all of a gratifying charac-
of ter. Urape culture nas increased 25
per cent, in four years. Never before
of . was so much clear profit realized on
or. grapes as in J24 ana its&o.
This society has been of milch bene-
fit to our State, and can be of much
greater benefit, specially in the way of
educating the fruit growers in proper
methods of handling and shipping fruit
The growers of Western Carolina spe
cially need to be stirred up on this mat
ter. West of the Blue Ridge the finest
apples in the world are raised and the
quantity of production is increasing
very rapidly every year. It ought to
be a source of large wealth to our sec
tion; but, our people must learn to
1 A 1 e
p"? more P?ins. gthnn& Handling,
P8 ana snipping, Deiore they can
nT to successfully and upon
, , , .
weM P?1. and shipped from more re-
m.0.ie. Vm' rresent rreignt rates,
mote
which are full high, but will decrease
with increase of tramc, our people can
reach Southern markets off the sea
board upon an eoualitv with Northern
shippers; but the condition of their
fruit when it reaches the market, mix
ed and bruised, and in many cases dir
ty, at once places our shippers at a
disadvantage. The same will apply to
vegetables. Let the Horticultural so
ciety give special industry to this
branch of fruit business, and give the
people full instructions and advice upon
the matter, and they will render their
fellow citizens and the fruit industry
a lasting and profitable benefit. Ashe-
rtlte C itizen.
A Picture of Gen. Toombs.
It is pleasant to turn from the con
sideration of the late Mr. Toombs' tem
pestuous public career to the picture of
his private life. This, says the Augus
ta Chronicle, was like that of Chatham.
Intemiierate and inconsistent he may
have been at times in his career, but
faithful and affectionate and pure and
gentle to his lovely wife he always was.
'rot all the allurements of power, or
responsibilities of office or the stress of
political misfortune or post-bellum ex
ile could separate him from her. He
was courtly and noble in his family
circle; his words were soft in his wife s
queenly presence, and when the light of
her loving eves were shut out from
him, his feet were guided to the altar
where she had knelt, and he prepared
himself to meet her in a higher life.
Gen. Toombs made no high-flown or
hypocritical pretensions about religion.
He did not profess immediate change
of heart, nor could he promise entire
reform in his being but he entered
upon his religious career with the sim
Ple fa,tn of a child and the eternal hope
a nnsiian. eics-uoerver.
m m i . r m ij
Dangerous and Useless Practice.
The doctors are now inveighing
sharply against the black crape veil so
generally worn by ladies in mourning
They pronounce it unhealthy, expen
sive and unbecoming. Dr. Hunter Mc-
Guire says: The black crape veU is un
doubtedly hurtful, and the custom
should be abandoned; apart from its
poisonous dye and offensive smell, me
chanically it interferes with healthful
resperation. Dr. Brock says: I have
long considered black crape veils detri
mental to health and mentally depress
ing in their effect; and Dr. MaCaw
says: tne custom or wearing a crape
veil as an article of mourning apparel
would be honored in the breach rather
than inthe observance. These heavy dou
ble black veils prevent the free access of
air and light two essential elements
in health. They are unbecoming, ex
pensive, and from the dye are always
more or less disagreeable of odor. It
has long been known that black crape
over the face is exceedingly injurious
to health, but the custom of wearing
it has so long been in vogue that it
will probably be found impossible to
J break it up. Still the Richmond phy-
sycians say that some ladies are taking
111 - 1 -11 1
their advice, and are either doing away
with heavy crape or consenting to J
wear their veils up. This is at least a
beginning of the reform so much to
be desired.
Goed Music in France.
French will not dance to bad
i ii i ii ill
The
music, lr tney eat potatoes ana sail
all the week, and drink water without
wine from Easter Monday of one year
to Good Friday of the next, they will
have good music, lhose who have
traveled in the French provinces must
have often been astonished with the
excellence of mere village bands, and
at the perfect acquaintance with the
best and newest pieces of the musi
cians at village fetes. Nothing of a
popular character in music escapes
them; and the villagers hum a new air
in the provinces a very few days after
it is known in Paris.
An ingenious burglar's ladder was r-
centlv taken from a negro thief in
Washington. It was constructed of
light but strong rope, and at one end
had two sharp hooks fitted to fasten on
a window sill Thps was attached to
An iron rod eAoable of beins? extended
fhirfv nr fnrfv fppf. The whole eould
i . j : . j z" - . l T
be wrapped in a bundle about the size
of an ordinary umbrella. As the ap
M
paratus had a hooked handle, and was
inclosed in a case, the owner could car
ry it along the streets without attract
ing attention, while in two minutes it
could be turned into a rope ladder and
securely fastened to an unbolted win
dow, giving a burglar easy means of
'entranoe to a house. Boston Journal,
WARD'S WOES.
' . . . .
His Desperate Straggle and how
It Ended.
Just twenty-seven miles from the classic
city of Athens, GaM is located the thriving
little town of Maxey's, the residence of Mr.
Robert Ward, who has just been released
from a most perilous predicament, the par
ticulars of which he has consented to give
to the public. He writes as follows :
Maxxy's, OoucraoBPB Co., Oa.
July h, 1885.
For twelve or fourteen years I have been
a great sufferer from a terrible form of
blood poison which ran into the secondary,
and finally it was pronounced a tertiary
form. My head, face ami shoulders became
almost a mass of corruption, and finally the
disease commenced eating away my skull
bones. I became so horribly repulsive that
for three years I absolutely refused to let
people see me. I used large quantities of
most noted blood remedies and applied to
nearly all physicians near me, but my con
dition continued to grow worse, and all
said that I must surely die. My bones be
came the seat of excruciating aches and
pains ; my nights were passed in misery ; I
was reduced in flesh and strength ; my
kidnejs were terribly deranged, and life
became a burden to me.
I chanced to see an advertisement of
B. B. B., and sent one dollar to W. C.
Birchmore & Co., merchants of our place,
and they procured ouc bottle for me. It
was used with decided benefit, and when
eight or ten bottles had been used, I was
pronounced sound and well.
Hundreds of scars can now be seen on
me, looking like a man who had been
burned and then restored. My case was
well known in this county, and for the
benefit of those who may be similarly af
flicted, I think it my duty to give the facts
to the public, and to extend my heartfelt
titunks for so valuable a remedy. I have
been well for over twelve months, aud no
return of the disease has occurred.
ltOBEUT WARD.
Maxey's, Ga., July 1, 1885. We, the un
dersigned, know Mr. Robert Ward, and
take pleasure in saying that the facts above
stated by him are true, and that his was
one of the worst cases of Blood Poison we
ever knew in our county, and that he has
lcen cured by B. B. B. Botanic Blood
Balm. A. T. Buiohtwkm,, Merchant.
W. C. Bikcumork& Co., Mer'h'ts
J. II. Bkiohtwkll, M. D,
John T. Hart.
i, W. P. Campbkli..
Atlanta, Ga, July 10, 1885. Wc are ac
quainted with A. T. Brightwell and W. C.
Birchmore & Co., whose names appear
above, and take pleasure in saying that
wey are gentlemen , oi un
doubted veracity
ii i un i iv in I'nnnniuif'ii
any assertion
thej uiakc.
hey
HOWARD & CANDLER,
Wholesale Druggists, Atlanta, Ga.
Sold everywhere.
REMARKS.
If B. B. B. will cure such terrible cases
as the above, is it not reasonable to sup
pose that any and all cases of Blood Dis
ease can lc cured i We do not announce
the cure of a man while he is at home
groaning and suffering with the disease,
but all of our certificates are words of truth
from those who have been cured and can
look you squarely in the face and say so.
We cure in a shorter time, with less money
and less medicine than ever before known.
IV. ,1111 111.111 UUI Ul II UIIMUV,
free to any one, filled with more astound
ing home evidence than ever before pub
lished. Call ou your druggist, or address
BLOOD BALM CO., Atlanta, Ga.
Dccl7J17
Kerosene Oil!
BY THF BARREL AT
ENNISS' Drug Store.
July 9, '85 tf.
FRESH TURNIP SEED?
The Earliest and Best Turnip Heed for
tale at EN KISS'.
TRUSSES
reduced prices, at
Of all kinds, at
ENN1SS'
Fruit J ars !
CHEPER THAN EVER.
ALSO
Rubber Rings for Fruit Jars, at
ENNISS'.
SCARE'S PRESERVING POWDES
For sale at
ENNISS'.
THE BEST AND CHEPEST
MACHINE OIL
For Threshers, Reapen, ami Moweis at
ENNlSS'r
PRESCRIPTIONS 1 1
If vou want your prescriptions put up
cheaper than any wlierc else go to
ENNISS' Drug Store.
J-Vy 9, '85. tl. ,
Enniss' Blackberry Cordial,
roK
niiAnterr. Oiarrhcaa. Flux, &c, for sale
At ENNISS' Drug Store.
NOTICE.
Having qualified as Administrator of
Paul Holshouser, dec a, I nereoy give no
tice to all persons having claims against
the estate of said decedent, to present them
to me on or before the 12th day of Novem
ber 1886 ChkisknMcrt UOLSKOCSXm,
'17 Adm r of Paul Holshouser
C'raige & Clement,
Att'ys.
C. A. KRA.TJS,
OR2TA232TTAL PJOTa?. i
-:-o-:-
m Particular attention paid to freaootac and
ofcorauve painting. In oil. wax or wtLer-cnkm
Will make tti.ls uu ctiurclkP. uutltc bulUlloin an
pmaterralaeBoea. Work guaranteed. HattreaoM.
r desired
Putt office adtlrefiti.
c- ft-SSlWfc.
47t3m
WHEN YOU WANT J
HARDWARE
AT LOW FIGURES
Call on the undersigned at NO. 2. Granite
Row. D. A. AT WE LI
4VM for the
Salisbury, N. C, June 8th tf.
Mineral Springs Acafleny,
PALMERSVILLC.(Hiauveo)N.o. I
C. M. MARTIN, I'MNCirAL,
iQriuuate of Wake Forest Collew, a
toe rm v.'rsity or Virginia.
rriTios, ss to $15 per session of &
The only school la tAls section that teaches
tto University of Va. methods. Vlimroue. ex-l
tensive, thorough. The cheapest school la the!
U. 8. where these world-re noWed methods are
taught. Good Board only as per month.
I 17 ly Address. V II. M aktih, PliB.
L
SEND YOUR WOOL
TO THE
THIS NEW FACTORY u
is no"- in operation, and facilities for man
ufacturing Woolen Goods such as have nev
er before been offered to our people, are
within the reach of the entire Wool grow
ing community.
We manufacture JEANS, CASSIMKR9,
FLANNELS, MNSEYS. BLANKETS,
YARNS, ROLLS, Ac, ,
Soliciting a liberal. patronage of our peo
ple, we are respectful fy, ? ,
Samsblkt Woolbx mills.
gT Office at old Express Office.
X ay 28th, 1885. 82tf
R.T.HOPKINS
IS NOW AT TUB T
Corner of Kerr A
with a full line of DRY GOODS
GROCERIES. AUo keia a Kirst
BOARDING HOUSE. Call and see
28:ply.
. .7
IP YOU WANT TO
FILL YOUR GAME BAG.
AND MAKE
BIG SCORES,
USE
remington
ifles-ais:
SHOT GUNS.
AH the Latest
FOR DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULAR
ADDRESS
Lamberson, Furmanlftb'
SOLE ACENTS FOR
E.REMlNGTON&SOIli
aMr0ag Arm mi A tf
281 & 283 Broadwyfr
WESTERN OFFICE, ,
D. H. LAMBERSON
ARMORY, - - - IOON,
REMINGTON
SHOVEL8,
SCOOPS, 8PADII.
liKiTiKtT saiici. it nuua
IE ME HE I THAT IN MMS AKAlVftTS
One Piece of Solid
NO NOUS OR RIVETS TO WEAKEK THf
send won ciacoLaas.
REMINGTON AGRICULTURAL Cl.i
Hew V.rk OSlc. 118
LAMP CHIKNETS
that will Bot break by beat, lor swe ai
ExiISs
DIAMOND
wish at
All
colors TUM
ENNISS
for Seeds of
EN N 1 88',
DON'T FORGET to call
all kinds at
TO THE LADIES t
Call and see the Flower Pot at -
RNNISS.
A MILLION of worms gnawing day
.4kt is ouite enooeh. we thik, tkrew
a child into spasms.
mlfugc will destroy
restore the cb ild.
Shriner'a
Tar-
uxl expel t
MAKUWAKL
Salisbury Woolen Mills
i
i
i 11
J
L
ft I
-
I i 1
    

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