North Carolina Newspapers

    The Oldest Newspaper Published In North Carolina
The Carolina Watchman
'"The Watchman Carries a Summary of <-All The News”
Founded 1832~99th Year SALISBURY, THURSDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 24, 1951 Vol. 26, No. 30 Price 2 Cents
— — ■ ' - 53 — - '
Long Not To Run For Congi crs
DENIES REPORTS
THAT HE MIGHT
TOSS \T IN RING
Leaves Field Open For
Walter H. Woodson and
R. L. Doughton, Incum
bent.
POLITICAL LEADERS
BRINGING PRESSURE
ON WOODSON TO RUN
Solicitor Of This District
Will Continue to Devote
His Time To The Prose
cution Of Criminal
Dockets.
Zeb. V. Long, solicitor of the Su
perior court in this district, will not
be a candidate for Congress from the
eighth district in 1932, he has advised
a representative of The Carolina
Watchman.
He will continue, to prosecute the
criminal dockets in the Superior court,
he stated. His term expires three years
hence. He was elected for a four-year
term at the last general election.
Reports that he might probably en
ter the race have been current in po
1 litical circles for some time. He has
long been considered a potential can
didate and at one time it is known
on Mr. Long urging
him to make the race. .He is well
known over the Congressional district
and would undoubtedly have made an
excellent race had he decided to run.
I shall not run for congress,” he
told The Watchman representative.
"That is definite. My friends have
urged me to run for some time but I
have decided to remain out of the
race.”
This leaves the field open so far
for R. L. Doughton, incumbent, and
Walter H. Woodson, Salisbury, should
he decide to run. Although neither Mr.
Doughton or Mr. Woodson have not
definitely announced themselves as
candidates, it is known both are se
riously considering making the race.
Political leaders of this congressional
district have conferred with Mr.
Woodson during the „past several
weeks and have promised him their
supoprt should he decide to enter the
"ace. Considerable pressure has been
Drought to bear upon Mr. Woodson
md although he has not definitely
nade up his mind, it is known he has
:he matter under advisement and will
nake his decision in the near future.
Many feel that in view of the fact
dr. Doughton has represented this dis
rict for twenty odd years he should
tep down and allow others to contest
or this office. Should this occur, it
s the opinion of political leaders that
dr. Woodson would be the outstand
ng candidate.
DIES FROM HURTS
Asheville—J. M. English, 62, Ashe
ville lumber man, died in a Sylva hos
pital from injuries suffered when his
automobile plunged over a 600-foot
precipice near Fontana, Swain county.
J. P. SENTENCED
Winston-Salem—Magistrate M. C.
Oliver, who pleaded guilty to mal
feasance in office, was given a term
of six months on the roads by Judge
J. H. Clement in Superior court here.
He appealed to the Supreme court and
posted bond of $800.
PAROLES SOUGHT
Marion—Petitions for the parole of
George Styles, Robert Perkins and Le
on Moore, Marion youths serving time
for dynamiting implications during
the Marion textile strike of 1929, are
being circulated here by friends.
MAN IS HELD
Lincolnton — At the preliminary
hearing here before Judge S. M. Roper,
Ray Abernethy, of Maiden, arrested
two weeks ago charged with criminal
ly attacking Miss Ruth Lynn, pretty
Lincolnton girl, was bound over to
Superior court under $1,500 bond.
Rowan Farmers To Give Food To Needy
SURPLUS FRUITS
AND VEGETABLES
BE DISTRIBUTED
Contributions Will Be
Handled Through Pub
lic Welfare Department
By Superintendent Lin
ton.
CLUB MEMBERS
TO GIVE CANNED
FOOD FOR POOR
Perishables Not To Be Put
In Competition With Lo
cal Markets; Campaign
For Associated Charities
And Travelers Aid Con
tinues Today.
Farmers of Rowan county are be
ing offered the opportunity to give
of their surplus foodstuff and canned
vegetables to the Public Welfare de
partment this winter for processing
and distribution among the destitute,
under the direction of Mrs. Mamit
I,inton, superintendent. Many hav<
stated they will contribute according
to their ability.
Three local agencies are working
—_* ' I , if i iT 11' ifiT (*m i fin
this winter. They are:
Public Welfare department, Mrs.
Mamie Linton, Superintendent.
County agent, W. G. Yeager, who
is also master of the Rowan Grange.
Home Demonstration department,
Miss Mamie Whisenhunt, superintend
ent.
Request has been made of the va
rious farm clubs and organizations in
the county for each member to do
nate at least one can of foodstuff for
the needy this winter. Many are ex
pected to give a large number of cans.
No limitation is placed on the dona
tions.
Distribution will be made by Mrs.
Linton, superintendent of the Welfare
department. These contributions will
be distributed in definite localities and
in the county and cities in the coun
ty at large.
Citizens living in the various towns
and cities in the county are also asked
to give of their surplus foodstuff for
this purpose. Cash donations will also
be accepted.
Bounteous crops this season have
created a surplus in foodstuffs in
many localities and although there has
been a scarcity of money, there has
been an enormous crop production.
I -i' fnet, it is believed, will result in
unusually large contributions to this
cause.
Persons, organizations and clubs who
* will contribute of their surplus food
stuff or money are requested to ad
vise Mrs. Linton who will direct the
distribution.
The annual drive for funds for the
• Associated Charities and the Travel
ers Aid began yesterday and continues
through today. The campaign is head
ed by A. S. Jones, chairman. A total
of $3,000.00 is asked for Associated
Charities while $1,800.00 is sought
for the Travelers Aid. Gratifying re
sults were obtained yesterday and it is
hoped the goal will be reached today.
While these are two separate agencies,
they are co-operating in the drive for
funds to operate on during the ap
proaching year.
The Public Welfare department,
from June, 1930, to June, 1931, made
the following expenditures: $2,489.02
for food; $736.85 for drugs, nurse and
doctor bills; $610.80 for fuel; $329.
37 for clothing; for hospitalization
$244.50; for rent, $155.75; transients
$145.92; board for dependent chil
dren $61.14, for incidentals, such as
water and lights, etc., $84,67.
BEES WIN RAG
Charlotte—The Charlotte Bees de
feated the Raleigh Caps four games
out of six to win the Piedmont pen
nant.
I
GOOD MORNING!
It was only a glad "Good morning,
As she passed along the way;
But it spread the morning’s glory
Over the livelong day!
—Carlotta Perry.
ART FOR LOVE’S SAKE
She—"Can you draw?”
He—"A little—why?”
She—"Then draw closer.”
DREAMS ARE CHEAPER
Dreaming of a palace
That is perched upon a hill
Looking on a river
Where the sunlight’s never still;
Dreaming of a serving force
That serves my every whim;
Dreaming, only dreaming,
The reality is slim.
Dreaming of a palace
That is glistening and white,
Full of life and gladness,
Of pleasure and delight;
Dreaming, nothing more than that,
In moments I relax,
And better so, for dreams, you know
No government can tax.
NOTHING SEXY
She—I thought of
ETHICAL DIPLOMACY
"Dad, what does it mean here by
diplomatic phraseology?”
"My son, if you tell a girl that time
stands still while you gaze into her
eyes, that is diplomacy. But if you
tell her that her face would stop a
clock, you’re in for it.”
A TABLOID STORY
O’Rafferty, Vacca & McPherson
Real Estate.
O’Rafferty, Vacca & Ginsberg
Real Estate.
O’Rafferty & Ginsberg
Real Estate.
Ginsberg & Sons
Real Estate.
MIGHT HAVE SWAPPED, EH?
Monroe Enquirer.
Well, what do you know about
this? A man came to my residence
on a recent day, rang the door bell
and proffered to sell our cook some
vegetables. Upon being told that a
supply had been purchased for the
day, he remarked: "Well, how about
some home brew?”
Now, if I’d been at home at the
time no tellin’ what might have hap
pened !
A firm in Massachusetts which
manufactures pocketbooks announces
that it has more orders for its pocket
books than it can fill. Well, we also
have more pocketbooks than we can
fill.—Albany Evening News.
WEDDING RHYMES
1. Marry when the year is new,
Always loving, kind and true.
2. When February birds do mate,
You may wed, nor dread your
fate.
3. If you wed when March winds
blow
Joy and sorrow both you’ll know.
4. Marry in April when you can,
Joy for maiden and for man.
5. Marry in the month of May,
You will surely rue the day.
6. Marry when June roses blow,
Over land and sea you’ll go.
7. They who in July do wed,
Must labor always for their bread.
8. Whoever wed in August be,
Many a change are sure to see.
9. Marry in September’s shine,
Your living will be rich and fine.
10. If in October you do marry,
Love will come, but riches tarry.
11. If you wed in bleak November,
Only joy will come, remember.
12. When December’s snows fall fast,
Marry, and true love will last.
SIX MURDER CASES ARE DISPOSED OF
AT SEPT. TERM OF SUPERIOR COURT;
STATE FREES TWO BY TAKING NOL PROS
1 Taking almost eight days to try the
criminal docket, the September term of
the Rowan county superior court dis
posed of six murder cases. This was
probably the heaviest criminal docket
in this county in several years.
The outstanding cases follow:
Scott Winders, charged with the
murder of Sheriff Locke McKenzie,
was adjudged insane and ordered com
mitted to the state asylum at Raleigh,
the criminal insane department.
J. W. Ballard and Bernie Mathiews,
negroes, were convicted of the mur
der of Frank Stewart and were sen
tenced to be electrocuted October 23.
The appeal which was taken at the
time the verdict was rendered, was
withdrawn later by counsel after the
two negroes had made a complete con
fession.
William Burris, charged with the
murder of Dennis Allen, both color
ed, tendered a plea of guilty to man
slaughter, which was accepted by the
state and was sentenced to serve from
two to five years in the state prison.
M. F. Ritchie, charged with man
slaughter in connection with the death
of George L. Patterson, was released
Coleman, also colored, was nol prossed 1
by the state.
Rosena Chalk and Josephine Wat
son, negro women, charged with the
murder of Jim Chalk, tendered pleas
of manslaughter, which were accept
ed by the state. Rosena received a sen
tence to the state prison for two to
three years. Josephine drew a term of
one to two years.
Other cases of. lesser importance
were tried at this term of court which
began September 14 and concluded the
criminal docketed September 22.
Probably the most interesting cases,
outside of those listed above, were
those against Carl Whirlow, J. B. Tar
bush, Will Doby and Jake Smith,
charged with breaking and entering
and larceny and receiving. Pleas of
guilty were entered and the follow
ing road sentences meted out: Whir
low, six months; Tarbush, four
months; Doby, six months and Smith
six months.
Society Buys Old House
Philadelphia—A group of prominent
citizens, organized as the Philadelphia
Society for the Preservation of Land
marks, have purchased the old Pow
ell Mansion.
The house was used as a gathering
place for the men who assembled in
Philadelphia during the formation of
the republic. Washington is said to
have attended many of the balls held
there.
SPRAGUE SILVER
LOSES POSITION
Raleigh—Major Sprague Silver, for
six years North Carolina motor ve
hicle supervisor, has been removed
from office by A. J. Maxwell, com
missioner of revenue, who announced
L. S. Harris, chief of the state motor
theft bureau, would succeed Silver and
be in charge of both offices.
10 DIVORCES ARE
GRANTED BY THE
SUPERIOR COURT
Ten divorces, granted by the Su
perior court during the September
term, follow:
Ida Beck Aldman vs Dave A. Aid
man.
Russell B. Hendricks vs Mary L
Hendricks.
Bernice Brandon vs B. R. Brandon
Mary Ann Lewis vs Marvin Lewis
Smith vs Annie Fox Smith
Roxie M. Davis vs Isiah Davis.
C. W. Misenheimer vs Martha Lu
cile Misenheimer.
Jack Granted Reno
Divorce From Estelle
Reno, Nev.—Jack Dempsey won a
divorce from Estelle Taylor on charg
es of mental cruelty in a 2 5 -minute
secret court hearing here.
Judge Thomas F. Moran granted
the decree by default because Miss
Taylor did not contest the case or
bring a cross complaint.
Dempsey, looking exceptionally
hearty, strode into Judge Moran’s
chambers with Jim McKay and Leon
ard Sachs. McKay, as star witness pre
sumably told the judge the details of
Miss Taylor’s "mental cruelty.”
Instead of handing Dempsey a be
ribboned divorce decree in five min
utes, as is customary in Reno, Judge
Moran gave almost half an hour to the
case. He spent all that time, he said,
so that Dempsey’s decree would be
"iron-clad.”
Hides Man’s Teeth,
Sets Him Fine Meal
Colon, Panama—Mrs. Thomas . Rus
sell, who hid her husband’s false teeth
md then set a tempting meal before
urn, has been punished. Her husband
aeat her up. She had him arrested.
A judge freed him.
Who s Who In Rowan
^LUD Vjr 3A1.15BUKI
OFFICERS
J. S. Forbes, President.
T. C. Cook, Vice-President.
W. Thomas Burke, Jr., Secretary.
Harold L. Isenhour, Assistant Sec
retary.
A. J. Wilson, Treasurer.
Bryce P. Beard, Trustee.
B. J. Wessinger, Chaplain.
John Rusher, Sergeant-At-Arms.
DIRECTORS
Miles J. Smith, Chairman.
C. F. Daniel.
H. E. Isenhour.
W. L. Tinnin.
S. Holmes Plexico.
MEMBERS
Bryce P. Beard.
W. T. Burke, Jr.
Lamonte Cress.
Thomas C. Cook.
C. F. Daniel.
Roy Deas.
D. C. Dungan. *
M. L..Davis.
J. S. Forbes.
J. H. Foil.
Linwood Foil.
O. J. Hill.
E. W. G. Huffman.
H. E. Isenhour.
Harold L. Isenhour.
J- H. Knox.
C. E. Kizziah.
P. J. Liske.
W. H. Leonard, Jr.
W. M. McCulley.
M. C. McRae.
S. H. Plexico.
B. J. Peeler.
C. A. Peeler.
C. F. Raney.
John Rusher.
Miles J. Smith.
Fred J. Stanback.
W. L. Tatum.
W. L. Tinnin.
E. W. Wagoner.
B. J. Wessinger.
C. D. Wheeler.
A. J. Wilson. j
»
NORTH CAROLINA
NEWS IN
BRIEF
FOR PROHIBITION REFORM
Wilmington—Mrs. W. N. Harris,
of Wilmington, reports the establish
ment in North Carolina of a branch
of the Women’s Organization for Na
tional Prohibition Reform.
GIRL STABS LOVER
Burlington—Grace Chapman, 19,
acceded to her lover’s own wishes and
stabbed him with his knife just above
the heart. The man, R. H. Jones, had
quarreled with the girl and then tore
open his shirt and said: "Kill me.”
PEOPLE SHOULD VOTE
Raleigh—Dr. A. T. Allen, state
superintendent of public instruction,
thinks the people should be allowed
to vote on the matter before any fur
ther reductions are made in school
costs in North Carolina.
"EASY STREET” IS CAUSE
Durham—President W. P. Few, of
Duke university, says "Easy street” is
the reason for America being so near
disaster. There are the times when the
qualities of our civilization and the
mettle of our people are tried, he saild.
COLLEGE GETS MONEY
Hickoj^ ,—Lenoir-Rhyne college has
to be used in a suitable manner. An
additional $10,000 went to the Lu
theran Orphan’s home in Salem. Va.
FATHER KILLS CHILD
Lexington—O. W. Davis backed his
car and was leaving his premises when
he discovered that he had backed his
machine over his six-months-old child
and crushed out its life. Unknown to
the father, the child was back of the
car where other children had been
playing.
CURTAILMENT URGED
Smithfield — At an enthusiastic
meeting of farmers and business men
held here, resolutions were passed call
ing on Gov. Max Gardner to follow
Texas in her legislative program to
curtail cotton production next year.
Governor Gardner had previously said
he would not call a special session of
North Carolina law-makers.
BENNETT TO TAKE FOOD
Greensboro—Bennett College for
Women in Greensboro has notified its
patrons that for this year farm pro
duce of all kinds will be accepted in
payment of tuition. Already many pa- 1
trons have come in laden with eggs,
potatoes, Irish potatoes, apples and !
corn meal and the college has accept- ]
ed the products in payment of tui-1 1
tion charges. '
i
TO PAY WITH COTTON
Shelby—The farmers of the great
est cotton growing county in North ,
Carolina will be permitted to pay their
admission with cotton to the Cleve- s
land fair. The secretary says anyone {
who appears at the gates during the 1
week with 12 pounds of seed cotton
will be permitted to enter without a
cent of money. (
TWO PILOTS INJURED *
Charlotte—John E. Lohr, High J
Point, and Albert Jones, Mount Tab- I
or, licensed pilots, were seriously in- p
jured at Harrisburg, 17 miles from
here, when their airplane, after be
ing badly damaged in a forced land
ing on the Southern railway tracks C
there, was struck by a passenger train.! o
HOTEL CLERK ROBBED ti
Reidsville—Police are searching for b
two men who robbed a bus company
cash drawer of $1J here and made
their escape after relieving John Best,1
:lerk of the Belvedere hotel, of $21. h
Best and a negro bell boy were the R
>nly persons in the hotel lobby, which ti
loused the bus company office, at the ly
time of the robbery. The negro slept L
through the entire affair. Si
    

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