North Carolina Newspapers

    The Oldest Newspaper Published In North Carolina
The Carolina Watchman
"The Watchman Carries a Summary of <lAU The Tews”
Founded 1832—99th Year SALISBURY, THURSDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 15, 1931 Vol. 26, No. 33 Price 2 Cents
1 ' ' 1 __ c?r*
• . " " ----5-- ■ - - - ** "
-■ n_
1 ransport Planes May Stop Here Daily
AIRPORT HEADS
NEGOTIATE WITH
E. A. T. LINES
-J
Expect Salisbury To Be
Designated As Regular
Stop Between Atlanta
And New York In Near
Future.
_•_
NEW OFFICIALS
AT AIRPORT ARE
VETERAN PILOTS
-5
Special Arrangements
Made To Accommodate
Airminded During Fair
Week; Local Port Best
In Two Carolinas, It Is
Said.
—5
The Eastern Air Transport lines,
operating between Atlanta and New
York, will make two stops daily in
Salisbury in the near future, accord
ing to assurances received by officials
of the local airport.
Negotiations with the transport
lines have been underway for some
time and favorable consideration is
being given the local airport, it is i
"It may take a little time to get lin
ed up definitely with the transport
lines, but I confidently believe Salis
bury will soon be designated as a reg- I
ular stop,” Mr. Joe Gamewell, one of
the airport officials, told a represen
tative of The Watchman.
Under this arrangement, the follow
ing stops would be made by each
plane: Leaving Atlanta, the first stop
would be Spartanburg, followed by
Charlotte, Salisbury, Greensboro, Rich
mond, Washington and New York.
Two large airliners, operated by the
Eastern Air Transport lines, now pass
over Salisbury daily. One plane, the
Curtiss Kingbird, has a passenger ca
pacity of 6 while the other plane,
known as Condors, can accommodate
18 passengers. Both have dual motors.
Salisbury is centrally located and
has around 500,000 persons living
within a radius of 50 miles. It also
has the best airport, field and hangars
in the two Carolinas, according to of
ficials of the local airport who have
visited extensively in the two states.
These facts, it is believed, will result
in the designation of the local port as
a daily stop.
joe uamewen, j_cAiiigLvii,
Frank Ely, Philadelphia, who recently
leased the Salisbury Airport, are grad
uates of Parks Air College, East St,
Louis, 111., the largest commercial fly
ing school in the world. This school
has the approval of the U. S. govern
ment. They have two planes at the
airport for passenger service anc
flights at any time during the day
which can be arranged by telephone
Both the pilots and the planes are com
mercially licensed. One plane is ;
Monocoupe and the other a Travel
Air.
These pilots have a three year rec
ord free of accidents. They also con
duct a repair station for airplanes anc
conduct a school for student fliers.
During the Rowan county fai:
next week, the pilots, in addition tc
handling passenger service, will als<
put on a number of stunts to thril
the fair audiences.
-3
BANKER SENTENCED
Troy.—W. Farlow, cashier and ex
ecutive vice president of the Bank o:
Star, which closed its doors April 9
1929, with approximately $100,00<
on deposit, was sentenced to serve no
less than three nor more than fiv
years in the state prison when he wa
found guilty in Montgomery count;
superior court on a charge of violat
ing the state banking laws. He fidei
notice of appeal and bond was set a
$7,$00.
Good
Morning
*i.i II s
’TIS THE WAY YOU ARE
"It’s not the way you sing, not the
way you sigh,
Not the way you whine, but the way
you try,
That will hold you down, or will help
you far—
Not the way you seem, but the way
you are.”
IDEALS
I love you for what you are, but I
love you yet more for what you are
going to be.
I love you not so much for your
realities as for your ideals. I pray for
your desires that they may be great,
rather than for your satisfactions,
which may be so hazardously little.
A satisfied flower is one whose pet
als are about to fall. The most beauti
ful rose is one hardly more than a bud
wherein the pangs and ecstacies of de
sire are working for larger and finer
growth.
Not always shall you be what you
are now.
You are going forward toward
something great. I am on the wray with
you and therefore I love you.
—Carl Sandburg.
Dentist: "I’m sorry but I’m out of
gas.”
Sweet Patient: "Ye gods, do den
tists pull that old one, too!”
FAST WORKER
"Now tell me, did you ever get
pinched for going too fast?”
"Nope, I’ve been slapped.”
THRILLING
Flapper (young and enthusiastic):
"Have you ever met a man whose very
touch seemed to thrill every fibre of
your body?”
Woman - of - the - World (age 19
years): "Oh, yes.”
Flapper: "Oh, who is he?”
Woman-of-the-World: "My den
tist.”
NOT THAT KIND
"Was your husband chopping wood
last evening?” inquired Mrs. Pryer of
one of the neighbor women
"Chopping wood, no! What gave
you that idea?”
"Why I heard him tell a man on
the car that he accumulated a good
healthy pile of chips before he quit.”
OUCH!
A proud young father wired the
news of his happiness to his brother
in these words:
"A handsome boy has come to my
house and claims to be your nephew.
We are doing our best to give him a
proper welcome.”
The brother, however, failed to see
the point, and wired back:
"I have no nephew. The young man
is an impostor.”
MOMENTS WE WOULDN’T LIVE
OVER
"Daddy, may I have a dime ” ask
| ed George after he had been introduc
ed to the guests for dinner.
Daddy obliged with a smile.
"This time you won’t make me give
I it back after the visitors are gone, will
you, daddy?”
I UUJO rl U MUR
1 The flapper speaking:
I These sailors are a simple folk,
I like ’em;
They take me out till they’re broke,
I like ’em;
■ I like ’em naughty, tall and lean,
And fat, and short, and good anc
- green,
• And many other kinds I’ve seen;
: I like ’em.
: j They take me to a navy hop,
> They take me to a candy shop;
r I like ’em.
- But when they show me they don’
1 care,
t And crack my ribs and muss my hair
I love ’em!
FARMERS REQUEST GARDNER i
TO CALL SPECIAL SESSION
TO CURTAIL COTTON CROP
1 20 CENTS GONE; MAN JAILED
Raleigh.—Lawrence Gatling was
bound to superior court on a charge of
highway robbery. His bond was set at
$200.Gatling is charged with taking
20 cents from Sam Phillips, shoe re
pair shop operator.
-5.
RIDER DROWNED
Wilmington. — Howard Gurgan
ious, 8, was drowned in the Cape
Fear river when the bicycle he was
riding ran off a dock here. The body
was recovered some time later by
sailors from the coast guard cutter
Modoc, and an hour and a half’s re
suscitation efforts proved futile. The
coroner held an inquest was unneces
sary.
-*
DEMARCUS ELECTED
CHIEF CHINA GROVE
-S
W. B. "Big Bill’ Demarcus has been
elected chief of police of the town of
China Grove, succeeding J. H. Black
welder, it has been announced by
Hearne Swink, Mayor.
Mr. DeMarcus has been an officer
for a number of years. He served on
the Lexington force a while; was with
the federal prohibition forces for sev- ■
eral years, but in 1927- became a mem-'
ber of the Salisbury police force.
After being on the force about two
months, he resigned and returned to
the federal prohibition forces where
he remained for about two years. He
then returned to the Salisbury police
force as a patrolman, and served until
July 1, 1931, when he was replaced
under the new city administration.
Since that time he has been a deputy
in Sheriff Miller’s office.
-5
STUDENTS WORK WAY
G reensboro—Approximately 18 S
students of North Carolina college
helped themselves through the state
institution for women last year. The
largest amount made by a student
worker was $43 8. Twenty-eight of
the self-helped girls made more than
$100 each.
-5
POWER TO REGULATE
Raleigh.—Under an interpreta
tion of the new banking laws pass
ed by the 1931 general assembly the
state banking department is vested
with extended authority to regulate
and take steps for improving banking
in this state.
-5
Sentiment in favor of a special ses
sion of the North Carolina General
Assembly to consider legislation look
ing toward the reduction of cotton
acreage in the state, with the Texas
plan favored, was expressed at a num
ber of farmers’ mass meetings held in
North Carolina last week.
N. G. Bartlett of Kinston, secre
tary of the Eastern Carolina chamber
of commerce—sponsor of the meetings
—will head a delegation to Governor
Gardner with reports on the meetings
some time in the near future.
At a meeting in Newton of Cataw
ba county, farmers and merchants,
resolutions were passed calling upon
Governor Gardner to assemble the
General Assembly to consider the low
price of cotton. The Texas plan of
curtailment was favored. Attendance
was light.
About 75 Anson county farmers
and business men met at Wadesboro,
where resolutions similar to those
adopted at Newton were favorably re
ceived.
Robeson county farmers, meeting in
Lumberton, also .adopted resolutions
similar to those adopted at Newton
and Wadesboro.
In Fayetteville, a meeting of farm
ers /n'ent on record as favoring a spe
cial session of the legislature to enact
legis’ation reducing acreage of both,
cotton and tobacco.
Fifty-six farmers and business men
met at Jacksonville, and adopted res
olutions urging legislative action cur
tailing the planting of cotton in 193 2.
"It seems now the turn of North
Carolina to reciprocate the action of
her sister states,” the resolution read.
Approximately 75 farmers and oth
ers interested attended the meeting at
Clinton. Resolutions were passed re
questing Governor Gardner to join
with other southern states in the
movement to reduce cotton acreage
by legislation.
Eight farmers meeting in Washing
ton at the call of the Beaufort coun
ty commissioners unanimously adopt
ed a resolution opposing a special ses
sion and further requesting represen
tatives to oppose bills for acreage re
duction of cotton and tobacco if a
special session is called.
A. D. McLean, Beaufort county’s
representative, led the movement for
the resolution. State Senator Halleft
S. Ward, also in attendance, said he
would vote for reduction legislation,
but added he does not think it would
work.
Who’s Who In Rowan
SALISBURY-SPENCER CENTRAL
LABOR UNION
OFFICERS
President, C. A. Fink.
Vice President, C. H. Bringle.
Recording Secretary, F. T. Corne
lius.
Financial Secretary, G. L. Seamon.
Treasurer, H. G. Fisher.
Sergeant-at-Arms, J. E. Shepherd.
Chaplain, H. S. Pinkston.
TRUSTEES
D. J. Butler, Chairman.
H. E. Wheeler.
M. M. Mask.
COMMITTEES
Legislative
D. J. Butler.
R. R. Ray.
J. M. Monroe.
Union Label
J. L. Shaver.
R. W. Garrison.
P. E. Weant.
Organization
H. E. Wheeler.
W. F. Cauble.
G. L. Seamon.
; Education
H. S. Pinkston.
, H. G. Fisher.
J. E. Shepherd.
Grievance
C. H. Bringle.
M. M. Mask.
J. H. Kirby.
Press
F. T. Cornelius.
E. L. Heilig.
D. G. Parks.
-5
BANKER IS KILLED
Albemarle.—The death of John R.
Jones, Jr., 36, executive vice president
of Cabarrus Bank and Trust company,
who was killed in an automobile
accident 10 miles beyond Bisco on the
Raleigh road was the greatest shock
to hit the business life of this com
munity since the death of A. C..
Heath 18 months ago.
-5
SURRENDERS
Lumberton. — Alford' Britt, of
Britt’s township, was admitted to a
hospital here with serious gunshot
wounds. John Stevens, a neighbor,
surrendered to officers, telling them he
shot Britt in self-defense.
-5- .
The ratio of complaints to calls in
the British phone service is about 1 tc
25,000. (There’s a number for the Bell
system to shoot at!)
1 «
NORTH CAROLINA
NEWS IN
BRIEF
* »
HORTON TO DEFEND DRAKE
Raleigh.—State Senator W. P. Hor
ton of Chatham county has been re
tained to aid Solicitor J. C. Little in
the trial of W. B. Drake, former Ral
eigh banker, under indictment for vio
lation of the state banking laws,
which began here before a Chatham
county jury.
ACCOUNTANTS WILL MEET
Durham.—Members of the North
Carolina association of certified pub
lic accountants will hold a three day
session at Duke university beginning
Thursday, October 22. It will be the
association’s twelfth annual general
meeting.
SHERIFF LEAVES FOR WEST
Bryson City.—Armed with author
ity of the State of North Carolina,
Sheriff S. R. Patterson of Swain coun
ty has gone to Seattle, Wash., to re
turn to this state Ben Posey, 23-year
old mountaineer, wanted for the slay
ing of Judd Pilkington, 45, in Swain
county, July 11.
SANFORD WILL HAVE SHOW
Sanford.—Extensive _ preparations
are in progress for the Lee county
food, poultry, and livestock show
which will be held here Friday and
Saturday. The exhibits will be placed
in a vacant store room on Moore
Street, with the exception of the
livestock and poultry, which will be
exhibited in a vacant lot on Steele
street.
CANDIDACY IS ANNOUNCED
Fayetteville.—George McNeil well
known local business man and poli
tican is an avowed candidate for the
state senate of 193 3. In announcing
his candidacy, Colonel McNeill de
clared he was not yet prepared to put
forth his platform, but called atten
tion to the fact that he has always
been "in the forefront of the fight
for tax reduction.”
WILKES COUNTY MAN HELD
North Wilksboro.—S. C. Hutchin
son, prominent Wilkes county man,
charged with murder of Tyre Bowers,
his neighbor, at Moxley post office,
has surrendered to officers of the coun
ty, and is now in jail in Wilkesboro
awaiting a preliminary hearing.
Hutchinson, it is alleged, shot Bow
ers with a pistol through the arm
and chest. Bowers died after walk
ing ten feet. The shooting took
place at the home of Hutchinson
and it is said to have been the result
of a row over the liquor business.
X_
116 AUTOS STOLEN
Raleigh.—There were 116 auto
mobiles stolen in North Carolina
during September and 67 were re
covered during the month, L. S.
Harris, director of the motor vehicle
bureau, announced today.
During the month there were also
34; cars recovered which had been
reported stolen in previous months.
ICE PLANT BURNED
Southport.—Fire destroyed the
Southport Coal and Ice company’s
plant. The loss is estimated at $20,000
It is said there was insurance of un
known amount. It being placed ir
outside agencies. Several hundred ton
of is are in the warehouse that can b
used.
Y. M. C. A. GETS $100,000
New York.—The Young Womene’
Christian association, of Asheville, N
C., receives $100,000 under the wil
of Samuel E. Moorhead filed in surro
gate’s court. Mr. Moorhead, who diet
September 25, stipulated that thi
money be used as a building fun(
or for the acquisition of real estate.
Anna Johnstone Moorhead, o
New York, his widow, receives thei
household effects, and a $10,000 an
nuity the principal of which upoi
her remarriage or death is left t(
their daughter, Edith M. Bryant, o
Asheville, N. C.
MANY THOUSANDS
ARE EXPECTED TO
GO THRU GATES
-5
Carnival Spirit Will Pre
vail As Elaborate
Amusement Features
Have Been Arranged.
-5
WILL CONTINUE
ENTIRE WEEK OF
OCTOBER 19-24
-5
Hundreds Of Prizes And
Ribbons Will Be Award
ed Best Farm Products
And Livestock.
-—i
The third annual Rowan county
fair will begin Monday and continue
through the week. Plans have been
perfected to make this the biggest and
best fair ever staged in Rowan coun
ty
Fruits of the summer’s labor in ag
riculture will be on parade. There will
be dancing girls. Sounds of the horses
hoofs and the roar of speeding motors
will be heard daily.
Prize cattle, horses, cows, chickens,
turkeys, pigs, guineas, and sheep will
be on exhibit in competition for the
blue, white and red ribbons. Numer
ous judges will be kept busy awarding
l the honors to the best of each type.
Additional planes have been provid
ed by the airport, which adjoins the
fair grounds, to thrill those who are
airminded. Each day of the fair these
planes will be on hand to handle all ^ ^ 0
customers who desire to see the city
and county from the clouds.
' Numerous business houses and man
ufacturing plants in __ Salisbury and
Rowan county have obtained booths
and will put on exhibits.
All Rowan county school children
will be admitted to the grounds on
Tuesday, October 20th, free of charge,
the management announces.
Nothing has been left undone. W.
F. McCanless, owner; Paul Whitlock,
secretary; and Mrs. Meacham, super
visor, have been working for months
to make this fair second to none in
the state.
Thousands are expected to partici
pate in this event each day.
The carnival spirit will prevail. The
perennial balloons, the toy noise con
traptions, the inevitable rubber ball
with its strings limiting its destina
tion, and the stringed strains of the
hula hula orchestra will blend in the
spirit of the occasion.
The various county farm agencies,
clubs and organizations, augmented by
civic bodies, have co-operated with the
fair management in insuring the suc
cess of the event.
--
MERCHANT SHOT
Reidsville.—Two holdup men en
tered the store of G, W. Toler, 5 5,
near here last night, shouted “hands
up” and then shot Toler through the
stomach before he could raise his
hands.
Bleeding from wounds in his body
and on one hand, Toler then was
tightly bound while the robbers help
ed themselves to the available cash and
fled toward Draper in an automobile.
Toler’s groans attracted a small boy
who notified others. The door was
broken down and the almost exhaust
ed Toler found.
-1
BOYS CHOOSE PROFESSIONS
Davidson.—Over one-sixth of the
students now attending Davidson
college intend to make business their
life work, statistics complied by the
; registrar show. Eighty-nine are plan
ning to become doctors and law comes
third with 65 men planning to enter
that field.
I-5
: MAN FOUND DEAD
1 Rutherfordton.— C. C. Koone, 77,
better known as “Uncle Dock,” was
: : found dead in his home at Thermal
• | City. He had been dead or missing
■ : since Tuesday night, Being a bachelor
i and living alone neighbors who had
> not seen him since Monday forced
F their way into the home and found
him.
    

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