North Carolina Newspapers

    The Oldest Newspaper Published In North Carolina • . -
The Carolina Watchman
"The Watchman Carries a Summary of All The "Hews”
Founded 1832~99th YearSALISBURY, THURSDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 5, 1931 Vol. 26, No. 36 Price 2 Cents
Cannons Erect Huge Warehouse
Attorney General Seeks Re-Election
REPORT FOLLOWS
WITHDRAWAL FROM
GOVERNOR’S RACE
-5
Attorney General Has
Held This Position For
The'Past Four Years.
-5
SENATOR McSWAIN
FROM CLEVELAND
ALSO CANDIDATE
-5
Others Are Expected To
Enter Race For This Of
fice In The Near Future.
' . -J
Raleigh, Nov. 4.—Attorney Gener
al Dennis G. Brummitt will be a can
didate for re-election to the position
he now holds, it was announced here
today.
This statement comes closely on the
, heels of his withdrawal several days
ago from the gubernatorial contest.
He had long been considered one of
the outstanding candidates for .gover
nor although he had never formally
announced.
Senator Peyton McSwain has an
nounced his candidacy for the office
of attorney general and several others
have indicated their intention of en
tering the race.
Mr. Brummitt has been attorney
general for the past four years.
Senator Rivers Johnson has
•earnest
Good
Morning
MAYBE THIS EXPLAINS IT
Gone is the lad with the gay silk shirt
And the frisky jane with a kneelength
skirt—
Oh, how I hate depressions!
The streets are drab as a winter sky,
With nary a dimpled knee to eye!
Why wouldn’t it sadden the gayest
guy?
Oh, how I hate depressions!
It’s bad enough that the stocks have
flopped
And farmers moan that they’re over
cropped—
Oh, how I hate depressions!
Arid why, when there’s this to make
us blue,
Do they lengthen skirts that the janes
wear, too?
No wonder our hope says too-da-loo—
Oh, how I hate depressions!
Commissions study the pesky slump
To make a slim pickings grow nice and
plump—
Oh, how I hate depressions!
And all forget that the slun^p began
When modistes fell for a dumb-bell
plan
To hide janes’ shins from the eyes of
man—
Oh, how I hate depressions!
CUTTING OVERHEAD
WATCHMAN PUBLICATION DATE
CHANGED TO FRIDAY OF EACH
WEEK: OTHER FEATURES ADDED
Starting with our next week’s issue,
The Watchman will be published each
Friday morning, instead of Thursday
morning, as has been the custom here
tofore. This change was made in re
sponse to numerous requests from our
advertising merchants and readers.
During the past few weeks, numer
ous advertisers have pointed out that
Friday would be a better publication
date for week-end specials and general
advertising purposes as the largest sales
are generally made on Friday and Sat
urday of each week. The change will
also enable The Watchman to carry
additional and more timely news each
week.
If, as is anticipated, the change will
enable The Watchman to better serve
its readers and advertising patrons,
then the publishers will feel amply re
paid for the trouble and expense they
have gone to in making the change.
This change will be effective begin
ning with the next week’s issue of
The Watchman.
The two page comic section which
started with last week’s issue met with
such a hearty welcome and outspoken
approval from our readers that the
publishers are this week adding still
other features of a like nature. Begin
ning with this week’s issue the nation
ally famous comic strip, "The Family
Next Door,” will be carried as a reg
ular feature. Other features added in
clude "Odd—But True,” "Little Pen
o-Grams,” and "Do You Know?” A
quarter page feature of special inter
est to women will be provided under
the heading "Hints for the House
hold,” by Miss Betty Webster, one of
the highest paid writers on home eco
nomics; also a special article on "The
Road to Better Health,” by Dr. Wil
liam J. Scholes.
The special features have been add
ed at a considerable expense to the
publishers in furtherance of their de
sire to make The Watchman one of
the outstanding weeklies of North
Carolina. With this same purpose in
view, as occasion arises and the growth
of the paper will justify, still other
features will be added.
The Watchman is grateful for the
fine reception it has received during
the past few months while published
under new management.
LEGION COMPLETES
ARMISTICE PLANS
$106,000 SOUGHT
SUITS
NORTH CAROLINA
NEWS IN
_BRIEF_
WHISKY ARGUMENT
Elkin—Bill Jenkins, 18, was shot by
E. Floyd Stanley after the two had
argued over whisky. The youth is al
leged to have taken a cache of liquor
belonging to his assailant.
SLAYER MAKES ESCAPE
Raleigh—‘An unknown man who
robbed Circle filling station No. 2
here and then shot to death one of
the attendants, J. R. Jackson, appar
ently completely covered his tracks.
Officers are without a clue that might
lead to an arrest.
SPECIAL SESSION?
Raleigh—Governor Gardner will
probably decide the latter part of this
week or the first of next whether or
not he will call a special session of the
legislature to consider the legislation
designed to help the agricultural class.
ALCOHOL CAUSES DEATH
Fletcher—Radiator alcohol, used as
the principal beverage at a drinking
party, caused the death of Lawrence
Walker, mechanic, and Frank Whitak
er is blind after having drank some
of the fluid, made to prevent water
from freezing in auto radiators.
—--<
Decrease Shown
In N. C. Farms
According to a bulletin recently is
sued by the Bureau of the Census
showing both State and County Sta
tistics, there was an increase in the
number of farms in North Carolina |
from 269,763 in 1920 to 283,482 in
1925, but a decrease to 279,708 in
1930. The total number of farms in
North Carolina includes 97,492 hav
ing from 20 to 49 acres, 72,673 from
50 to 99 acres, and 35,682 from 100
to 174 acres. There were 1,424 farms
having 500 acres and over.
Of the 279,708 farms in the State
in 1930 as reported in the census,
141,445 were operated by owners, 648
by managers, and 137,615 by tenants.
The land in farms decreased from 20,
021,736 acres in 1920 to 18,593,670
acres in 1925, and 18,05 5,103 acres in
1930. The value of farm land and
buildings decreased from $1,076,392,
960 in 1920 to $926,025,507 in 1925,
and $844,121,809 in 1930. The value
of farm implements and machinery in
1930 was $42,211,827 as compared
with $46,436,784 in 1925 and $54,
621,363 in 1920.
The total number of horses and colts
on larms on April i, i?iu was 50,
716. The total, exclusive of colts born
after January 1, 1930, was 86,377.
Horses and colts on farms numbered
130,063 on January 1, 1925 and 171,
436 on January 1, 1920.
The total number of mules and
mule colts on farms on April 1, 1930
was 294,308. The total, exclusive of
mule colts born after January 1, 1930,
was 294,172. Mules and mule colts on
farms numbered 279,767 on January
1, 1925 and 256,569 on January 1,
1920.
The total number of cattle on farms
on April 1, 1930 was 532,631. The
total, exclusive of calves born after
January 1, 1930, was 467,012. Cattle
on farms numbered 53 8,780 on Janu
ary 1, 1925 and 644,779 on January
1, 1920.
The total number of swine on farms
April 1, 1930 was 838,994. The total,
exclusive of pigs born after January
1, 1930, was 519,714. Swine on farms
numbered 871,787 on January 1, 1925
and 1,271,270 on January 1, 1920.
The total number of chickens ovei
3 months old on farms April 1, 193C
was 6,384.595. Chickens of all agei
numbered 8,558,145 on January 1
1925 and 7,393,161 on January 1
1920.
instruction.” The reply came collect.
"Start summer vacation as from yes
terday.”
MAIDEN
IF LOVE were not so wicked,
How lovely it would be
For me to give a little kiss
To you—ioccasionally!
But ah! to kiss is wicked,
A sin, the sages say:
I And so I will not fancy it
Except when you’re away.
(A thing I wish to know: Are sages
happy so?)
By Frederick Blankner.
ADD BITS OF INFORMATION
Not all women favor birth control,
but all of them are strongly in favor
of birthday control.
ALL'S WLLL
Watchman, watchman, what of the
night,
What of the night to tell?
There are widows weeping, and babes
afright,
And a ceaseless burial bell.
But the hand that holds the gun
Still shakes not;
And the line drops one by one,
Yet breaks not.
Of the blood so nobly poured
There shall surely be reward.
In the name of the Lord,
All’s Well!
Francis William Bourdillon.
GANDHI’S CODE
1. The service of truth as one sees
it.
2. Love.
3. Chastity.
4. Restraint of the palate.
5. Abstaining from the possession
of things for themselves.
6. Adherence to life’s law that
one’s bread must be earned by the
sweat of one’s brow.
7. Belief that man’s primary duty
is to serve his neighbors.
8. Belief in the equality of all
mankind.
9. Belief in the equality of all the
great* faiths of the world.
10. Fearlessness.
i MISSING SOMETHING
; Early to bed,
, . Early to rise,
, And you will miss
The regular guys.
vice men new at-tne courtnouse Tues
day night.
The various posts in this district,
which is composed of Rowan, David
son, Stanly, Union and Cabarrus
counties, will participate in the legion
festivities. Representatives from the
several counties were present Tuesday
night. Under a rotation plan recently
adopted, the celebration will alternate
between the different counties in the
district.
The program for the day consists
of an elaborate parade, addresses, bar
becue at Soldier's Memorial Park, foot
ball game between Salisbury and Ashe
ville highs, a district meeting, and a
charity revue at the Strand theatre.
-5
3 5 railroads operated at loss in first
seven months of 1931.
-5-_
E. F. Hutton of New York to give
two weeks’ food to 100,000 families.
Who’s Who In Rowan
OFFICERS OF LOCAL No. 226
International Brotherhood of Boiler
Makers, Iron Ship Builders and
Helpers of America
W. H. Woodford, president.
B. W. Barger, vice president.
Ben Brandon, financial and record
ing secretary.
J. A. Bernhardt, treasurer.
J. E. Shepherd, inner guard.
TRUSTEES:
R. R. Ray.
J. E. Shepherd.
W. W. Kluttz.
SHOP COMMITTEE:
R. R. Ray, chairman.
C. E. Miller.
J. F. Kennedy.
W. E. Peeler.
OFFICERS OF ROWAN LOCAL
No. 248
International Brotherhood of Black
smiths, Drop Forgers and Helpers
A. H. Heiiig, president.
A. A. Safrit, vice president.
W. F. Cauble, recording secretary
D. J. Parks, financial secretary.
L. B. Shuler, treasurer.
H. E. Safrit, conductor.
Henry Gobel, inside sentinel.
TRUSTEES:
W. F. Caubie.
A. A. Safrit.
David Geekie.
totaling > i ub,uuu, ior damages aris
ing out of the death of her husband
who was fatally injured on the night
of Nov. 9, 1930, when his automobile
was struck by a passenger train at the
North Fulton street crossing.
Damages in the amount of $71,000
are sought from the Southern Railway
Company and $3 5,000 from the City
of Salisbury.
-5
CATAWBA YOUTH IS HELD
Newton—Dee Combs, young Ca
tawba county white man, is under
$300 bond for his appearance at the
criminal term of superior court, meet
ing here November 16. He is charged
with larceny and breaking and enter
ing the C. M. Rowe department store
in North Newton October 1.
—-“5;
Feeling of optimism reported from
leading business centers.
Officials say deficit would reach
$3,800,000,000 if bonus wips.
SHOP COMMITTEE
David Geekie, chairman.
L. B. Shuler.
D. J. Parks.
OFFICERS' OF DIVISION No.* 375
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers
R. L. Pierce, chief engineer.
J. Wray Freemen, secretary and
treasurer.
W. H. Womack, first engineer.
W. D. Hutchinson, second engineer.
W. R. Nash, guide.
H. E. Lunsden, chaplain.
TRUSTEES:
J. L. Armstrong.
W. D. Hutchinson.
W. C. Quillian.
A. R. Harrison, local chairman and
legislative representative.
-9
INJURIES PROVE FATAL
Winston-Salem — Gwynn Reeves,
17, died in a hospital here as the re
sult of a broken neck sustained when
he -leaped from the top of a barn at
Shoals, in Surry county. Reeves, who
was attending a corn shucking at the
home of his uncle, E. S. Marion, jump
ed from the top of the barn and at
tempted to turn a somersault in the
air. His head struck the ground, how
ever, fracturing his fourth vertebra.
He was brought to a hospital here for
treatment.
spread to a tdoacco- warenduse aiM
dwelling house. The total loss is esti
mated to be $20,000. Stallings, it i
said, had been drinking.
PERFECT PRISONER, MAYBE
Greensboro—Tom Batchelor, Ala
mance county, was not at home when
federal officers went to his residence
to put him under arrest. The next
day he appeared at the office of the
Chief Deputy Marshall and apologized
profusely for the trouble he might
have caused. He asked that he be tak
en into custody.
REVENUE COLLECTIONS GAIN
Raleigh—An increase of approxi
mately $1,260,000 over collections for
a similar period of the 1929-30* fiscal
year was reported. Collections for the
first four months of the current fis
cal year total $6,264,820.89 as com
pared with $1,004,957.09 for the last
year.
C. L. SHUPING NAMED
Greensboro—C. L. Shuping has
been named to direct the Victory
Campaign of the democratic party in
North Carolina. A national prepared
ness drive is now being organized
throughout the nation under direction
of John W. Davis. Democrats hope
to raise $1,500,000 in the nation.
GRAHAM INDUCTED
Chapel Hill—Frank Porter Graham,
who was elected president of the uni
versity in June, 1930, to succeed Dr
Harry W. Chase, resigned, will be in
duced into his office on Nov, 11. Sev
eral colleges and universities through
out the south will have representa
tives here.
OFFICER FIRED UPON
Greenville—An unknown man in ;
car which Patrol Officer E. R. Head
ley sought to stop for violation of th<
highway laws, fired at the officer
The bullet hit the siren on the from
of the motorcycle and did not injuri
the officer.
WILL NOT RUN
Oxford—Attorney General Denni
G. Brummitt has announced he woulc
not be a candidate for the democrat^
nomination for governor of Nortl
Carolina in 1932 primaries. "For rea
sons of an entirely personal nature,’
a formal statement said, "I will no
be a candidate for governor in th<
democratic primary of 1932.”
WILL HOUSE ONE
MILLION BALES,
IT IS REPORTED
Will Cover Over Two
City Blocks In Kannap
olis; Around 50,000
Brick Being Laid Daily.
-5
OFFICIALS DENY
CURRENT REPORTS
OF BIG PURCHASES
Claim Warehouse Will Be
Used To Store Normal
Supply; Farmers Selling
Cotton Direct To Mills.
The Cannon Manufacturing Com
pany is erecting an immense ware
house on North Walnut street in Kan
napolis, covering over two city blocks.
This mammoth building will be used
for the storage of one million bales of
cotton, according to current reports
in local cotton circles Wednesday.
The construction is being rapidly
pushed, some 50,000 or more brick
being laid each day. This work re
quires a force of more than JO men.
The building will be one story in
heighth and is of standard construc
tion type for cotton storage. This con
struction work on the, part of this
large concern is requiring the services
of an extra shifting crew of the
6- handle eat load
in Rowan county are hauling this
. year’s crop to Kannapolis and selling
it to this company.
Just what the capacity of the ware
house will be is undetermined, but it
is evident to the casual observer that
it will house an enormous supply of
cotton, as it will probably cover four
acres.
Officials of the company denied
qurrent reports to the effect that the
new warehouse, which is under con
struction, will be used to house one
million bales of cotton to be purchas
ed on the market this year.
It is stated, the new warehouse will
be used to house cotton required in the
normal course of the company’s busi
ness.
The Cannon Mills, the largest tow
el manufacturers in the world, is one
of the biggest industries not only in
this state but in the entire country.
The different plants are located in
Rowan and Cabarrus counties and are
considered among the largest assets
listed in the two adjoining counties.
-a
STATESVILLE COACH KILLED
Statesville—Ray Perdue, 24, States
ville high school coach, was fatally in
jured Friday at Taylorsville in a fight
following an argument with Garfield
Jennings of Taylorsville, headlines
man for a football game between Tay
lorsville and Perdue’s team- The fatal
argument started near the close of the
game’s first half when Coach Perdue
stepped to the sidelines and protested
to the referee about a decision. Jen
nings resented the remark, and struck
Perdue in the face with his fist. Per
due dropped, unconscious. Medical aid
was given at once, but he died of con
cussion before he could arrive here.
-5
CHAPEL NEARLY BUILT
Durham—With the work on the
magnificent new chapel at Duke uni
versity, being erected over a two-year
period at a cost of two millions, en
tering into the final stage, hundreds of
persons from many sections of this and
other states are coming to see the
striking edifice.
i -5
: WOMAN HELD FOR MURDER
i Bryson City—Molly Running Wolf,
■ a Cherokee Indian woman, was in
’ dieted by the grand jury in the Swain
: county superior court for the murder
: of Rufe Deaton at her home last Sep
tember.
    

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