North Carolina Newspapers

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. , LIBRARY
The Oldest Newspaper Published In North Carolina catawba colleqs
The Carolina Watchman
"The Watchman Carries a Summary of- <lAU The Thews’’
Founded 1832~99th Year SALISBURY, FRIDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 4, 1931 Vol. 26, No. 40 Price 2 Cents
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72nd Congress To Meet Monday
Mistrial Ordered In Auto-Death Case
JURY UNABLE TO
AGREE ON VERDICT
IN CARTER TRIAL
Stanly County Man,
Charged With Man
slaughter In Connection
With Carl Tippett’s
Death, Must Stand Trial
Again.
JURY HOPELESSLY
DEADLOCKED, JUDGE
ORDERS A MISTRIAL
Salisbury Barber Was
Fatally Injured In Sep
tember When Struck By
A Car Driven By De
fendant.
With the jury hopelessly deadlock
ed, a mistrial was ordered by Judge
P. A. McElroy in Superior court here
late Wednesday in the case of D. C.
Carter who was on trial charged with
manslaughter in connection with the
death of Carl Tippett.
Tippett, Salisbury barber, was struck
by an automobile driven by D. C.
Carter, Stanly county, at the infer
J!***k- as a resuit of injuries <fiir September /
Carter was charged with man
slaughter. Entering a plea of not
guilty,, the case was hotly contested,
requiring several days for trial. Counsel
for the defense made several motions .
to dismiss upon the close of the state’s
evidence. The motions were overruled
and exceptions noted.
The jury reported on one or two ,
occasions that it was hopelessly dead
locked and unable to agree upon a
verdict. The jury was locked up Tues
day night and held deliberations all day
Wednesday without being able to
reach a verdict. Judge McEIroy then
ordered a mistrial late Wednesday
afternoon.
The criminal docket took up ten
days of the present two-weeks term.
The remainder of the week will be
devoted to the trial of divorce and
civil cases.
BIDS ARE RECEIVED
Raleigh—The state division of
purchase and contract has received
bids on a quantity of varied materials
and institutions.
Bids were opened for: 305,000 enve
lopes; 82 nurse cots; 500 double dec!
beds; 2,000 yards of drilling; 1,000
yards of knitted cotton padding; 500
yards of cottonade coat stripe; 300
pairs of leather home slippers; two
cars of natural rock asphalt; 1,050
creosoted sign posts; 1,000 gallons of
red lead paint, and a quantity of
smoking and chewing tobacco.
LAD FOUND DEAD
Maiden—Terry Lee Drum, nine
year-old son of Mr. and' Mrs. J. D.
Drum, was sent to the granary for a
pail of cottonseed. He did not return.
When Cersie, his sister, investi
gated, she found the little boy buried
beneath a high bank of seed 'into
which he had been digging. She pulled
him out, but he was dead.
FIRES LEAVE HOLES
Kinston—Forest fires which recent
rains have obliterated have left left
holes eight and nine feet deep.
Fires burned deeply into neat soil
and burned tree roots under the soil.
Rainfall in this section until the week
end had been less than one-fifth normal
for a three months period.
MOUNTAINEER IS SHOT
Cowarts—Junius Jones, 27, was in
a Sylva hospital seriously wounded
here while officers searched for alleged
assailant. In an affidavit to police.
Jones said Bowers had threatened to
kill him.
Good
Morning
HOWDY-DO
The witness was obviously new to
the ways of the courtroom. So the
judge directed him:
"Speak to the jury, sir—the men
sitting behind you on the benches.”
The witness turned, bowed clumsily
and said:
"Good morning, gentleman.”
DOORBELLS
I
Buzzing, jingling, jangling doorbells,
All day rings the bell;
Gents with shoestrings, dames with
needles,
Kids with fudge to sell;
Milkmen, icemen, laundry agents
Come in constant flow;
All we do is answer doorbells
Grumbling as we go.
II
Gone the days when jingling door
bells
Told of friends without,
Friends and neighbors brjngirtg
gossip,
News to talk about;
Dropping in for idle chatter
While they sipped their tea.
All we do is answer doorbells,
Sadly, wearily.
Ill
Buzzing, jingling, jangling doorbells
All the livelong day!
Peddlers, salesmen, dreary beggers—
ill we do is answer doorbells,
Sighing as we go. -
CORRECT
Mrs. Gadabout: "A husband should
•ring home the bacon.”
Mr. Gadabout: "Yeah! And a wife
hould be there to cook it.”
SIEXT ON THE PROGRAM IS—
Organizing a relief expedition to
cow back Winkin’s Arctic party—if
it can be found.
YES, SHE DOES
Husband—Bridges, do you know
anything concerning my wife’s where
abouts?
Bridges—Yes, sir. I put them in
the wash.
A LONG WAIT
Negro caller at hospital: "I came
to see how mah fren Sam Brown was
gettin’ along.”
Nurse: "Why, he’s getting along
fine. He’s convalescing now.”
Negro: “Well I’ll jes’ sit down and
wait till he’s through.”
RECIPE FOR GOOD MANNERS:
Of Unselfishness, three drachms;
Of the tincture of Good Cheer, one
ounce;
Of Essence of Heart’s-Ease, three
drachms;
Of the Extract of the Rose of Shar
on, four ounces;
Of the Oil of Charity, three drachms,
and no scruples;
Of the Infusion of Common Sense and
Tact, one ounce;
Of the Spirit of Love, two ounces.
-TACTLESS
At the Bookshop: "What has be
come of that salesman you had here?”
"I had to fire him. A man came
with his bride to buy a book for read
ing on his honeymoon and the stupid
salesman offered him 'Travels with
a donkey’.”
HIGH FINANCE
Says Abi: "Cohen, I’ve been to
the bank to borrow some money, and
they say all I need is that you should
sign my note. Then I can have all the
money I need. Ain’t that fine?”
"Abie,” says Cohen reproachfully,
"you and I have been friends for many
years, and yet you go to a bank when
you need money. Abie, you just go
again to the bank and say that they
should sign the note, and then Cohen
will lend you the money!”
KLUMAC MILL WORKERS STRIKE
WHEN WAGE CUT IS ANNOUNCED
IN WEAVE ROOM; MILL IS CLOSED
About 85 employes in the weave
room of the Klumac Cotton mill
walked out Wednesday when a wage
reduction of around 5 per cent was
announced.
As a result of this action on the
part of the weave room workers, the
entire mill was forced to close down.
Thursday the mill was idle.
This is the first shut down since
last Christmas, it is stated.
It is stated that around 85 men
are employed in the weave room of
the mill. The total number of em
ployes is around 200.
Weavers, it is stated, are paid ac
cording to piece work. The cut was
around 43 cents per hundred which
would amount to about a 5 per cent
cut in their weekly wage.
W. F. McCanless, manager of the
mill, was not in the city Thursday
and therefore could not be reached
for a statement.
The reduction was in line with a
general cut in wages put into effect
in the other departments of the mill
some time ago, according to officials
of the mill. ,
MANILA BEAUTIFIED
Manila.—Extensive public improve
ments have been made in Manila in
the last year, resulting in lessening
craffi congestion, -better Sanitation and
-*-.-:- 9
BETHEA ACQUITTED
Lumberton.—Harry C. Bethea,
police chief of St. Paul was ac
quitted in Roebeson superior court of
shooting Judd Dean to death in the
town of St. Paul. Bethea pleaded
self-defense.
Ray Lyerly Wins
Verdict In Suit
For False Arrest
The jury hearing the $25,000 false
arrest suit brought by G. D. Miller, of
Wilkes county against Ray P. Lyer
ly, former sheriff of Rowan county,
Thursday afternoon rendered a ver
dict in favor of Lyerly.
The jury answered the issues in Ly
erly’s favor, deciding that Lyerly was
not indebted to plaintiff in any
amount whatever.
Mr. Miller alleged that he had been
unlawfully arrested and placed in jail
by the former sheriff and his depu
ties.
It developed that the arrest follow
ed the finding of a certain quantity
of meat in plaintiff’s possession on
Feb. 22, 1930. Believing the meat had
been stolen, the sheriff and his depu
ties, arrested the plaintiff. It later
turned out the meat held by the plain
tiff had not been stolen, the suit re
sulting.
MAN ATTEMPTS SUICIDE
Hamlet—Bruce O’brien, 30, is re
covering in a hospital here following
his attempt to commit ■ suicide (by
drinking poison.
O’Brien left two notes, one to his
mother and the other to his em
ployer, asking their forgiveness and
saying he was tired of living. He
drank the poison near a filling sta
tion between here and Rockingham
and then drove into the place and
asked for a bottle of milk. He ex
plained to the proprietor what he had
done and a moment later collapsed.
At the hospital, the poison was pump
ed from his stomach and he regained
consciousness.
Sometime ago O’Brien and his wife,
who is now employed in a beauty par
lor aboard an Atlantic liner, separated
and it is believed the separation led
to his attempt suicide.
Bryson To Address
Duke Alumni Here
On Friday, Dec. 11
B. D. McCubbins, president of the
Rowan County Duke University
Association, announces that
«** uk spiuivw xur uk occasion, wnieii
is the seventh observance of the sing
ing of the Duke Indenture. Mr. Mc
Cubbins announces that a committee
has been appointed to work out full
details for the meeting, which will be
announced in a few days.
CASE AGAINST MINISTER IS
NOL PROSSED BY SOLICITOR
Waynesvijile—The case in which
the Rev. Caleb Ridley, former pastor
of the Tabernacle Baptist church,
Atlanta, Ga., was charged with viola
tion of the prohibition law was nol
pressed in Haywood county Superior
court here by Solicitor John M.
Queen. Dr. Ridley is seriously ill in
Atlanta. He was a patient in the
Angel Brother hospital, Franklin, until
recently.
MONROE HOME RANSACKED
Monroe—High pressure methods
were used by a burglar who ransacked
the home of Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Mid
dleton here.
The Middletons awoke this morn
ing with splitting headaches. Every
room in their home had been en
tered, but nothing was missed ex
cept $46, taken from Middleton’s
pockets.
Police believe the burglar admin
istered a drug of some sort before he
went to work.
The Middletons say they did not
once awaken last night although both
are light sleepers.
NORTH CAROLINA
NEWS IN
BRIEF_
SIX LOSE PLACES
High Point—Six municipal em
ployes have finished their work with
the High Point government here and
a score more will receive notices that
their wages have been reduced. Letters
were being prepared this afternoon in
the office of City Manager E. M.
Knox to notify them of the adjust
ments. Those who are leaving are E.
Curtwright, boys commissioner; W. L.
Smith, deputy tax collector; H. L.
Crowe, purchasing agent; E. D. Wells,
electrical superintendent; Miss Nell
Clinard and Mrs. W. G. Shipman,
who are in the public utilities of
fice. Those receiving cuts in their
salaries range from the city manager
downward. They are being eliminated
by a series of consolidations, made in
the name of economy. Purchasing
hereafter will be done through the city
manager’s office.
WOMAN IS INJURED
Elkin—Mrs. John Martin, of Jones
ville, sustained painful but not serious
injuries here when she, with other
members of the family, was driving
on highway No. 26, just north of
town, when the machine caught on
fire.
Her injuries were severe bruises
but no fractured bones. She was
confined to Hugh Chatham Memor
HELD FOR KILLING
Selma—Robert Bryant, negro, wa
given a preliminary hearing befor
Justice of the Peace J. H. Kirkmai
on the charge of killing James Smith
negro youth, at the home of Heze
kiah Washington in Selma. The negrc
claimed that he did not know the gur
with which he is alleged to have killec
Smith was loaded. He said he and the
deceased were not mad at each other
at the time the shooting occurred.
Failing to give a $400 bond he was
remanded to jail.
UNION TO ACCEPT TAX
Monroe—The Union county board
of commissioners has decided to accept
the offer of the Seaboard Air Line
railroad to pay the 1930 tax of $41,
340.43 which does not include the
penalty of four per cent that is plac
ed on delinquent payers. This decision
was made upon the advice of John C.
Sikes, county attorney, who acted as
agent for the commissioners at a meet
ings of representatives of the counties
through which the railroad runs.
KILLED IN CRASH
Durham—Mike Gresoffi, 18, Nor
folk antique collector, was instantly
killed here on the Durham-Oxford
highway when the truck in which he
was riding was struck by an automo
bile driven by Oscar Nunn, Durham
negro. Nunn, who has a police record
and is said by officials to be prominent
in bootlegging circles, is being held
in the Durham county jail.
CHEROKEE INDIAN CHOIR
Cherokee—Sacred songs of the pale
faces sung with the same tonal quali
ties in both English and their native
language compose the repertoire of
the Cherokee Indian choir at Yellow
Hill Baptist church.
The numbers range from the old
est to the newest hymns and are pre
sented with unusual effectiveness. The
Rev. H. D. Cohn of Candler reports.
Mr. Candler delivered a sermon Sum
day before the congregation.
STUDENTS INITIATED
Chapel Hill—Alpha Psi Delta,
psychology fraternity at the Univer
sity of North Carolina, has initiated
seven new members. Those initiated
were Miss Sybille Berwanger, Raleigh;
E. C. Hunter, Tobaccoville; O. D.
Knight, Chapel Hill; Daniel Pachman,
Brooklyn, N. Y.; William Treverton,
Marion; Mrs. R. B. Vance, Chapel
Hill; and Edith Webb, Oxford.
Who’s Who In Rowan
OFFICERS OF ROWAN COUNTY
BAR ASSOCIATION.
T. C. Linn, President.
P. S. Carlton, Vice President.
L. O. Gregory, Secretary-Treasurer.
THE FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF
THE LAWYERS IN SALISBURY
C. P. Barringer.
W. T. Burke, Jr.
John C. Busby.
P. S. Carlton
T. K. Carlton.
Hayden Clement.
L. H. Clement.
C L. Coggin.
W. C. Coughenour.
Kerr Ctaig.
J. C. Dunn.
J. W. Ellis.
G. V. Fesperman.
T. G. Furr.
Clyde E. Gooch.
E. C. Gregory (inactive).
E. C.. Gregory, Jr., (Dep. Clfe. Ct.)
F O. Gregory.
• ■
W. V. Harris.
J. G. Hudson.
T. F. Hudson.
E. W. G. Huffman.
R. C. Jennings (Postmaster).
John C. Kesler.
J. H. Kirby.
Stahle Linn.
T. C. Linn.
W. C. Maupin, Jr.
B. B. Miller.
Walter Murphy.
J. M. Prevette.
Charles Price.
E. L. Quillin, Jr.
D. A. Rendleman (Ins. Div. Nat.
Bks.)
J. L. Rendleman.
J. L. Rendleman, Jr.
Ira R. Swicegood.
L. A. Swicegood.
C. O. P. TrexTer.
George R. Uzzell.
J. M. Waggoner.
W. H. Woodson.
W. H. Woodson, Jr.
R. L. Wright.
NORTH CAROLINA
DELEGATION WILL
AUBE DEMOCRATS
Bailey to Take Seat With
out Contest, According
To Prediction Of Sena
tor Cameron Morrison.
NEW LINEUP GIVES
DEMOCRATS 219,
REPUBLICANS 214
Farmer-Labor Group Has
One Representative;
Jack Garner, Texas,
Choice For Speaker Of
House; Senate Controll
ed By G. O. P.
The 72 nd congress Will convene
Monday.
Recent elections have given. the
democrats control of the house. The
democrats will have a voting strength
of 219, while the republicans will be
able to muster only 214. The farmer
labor group has one representative. "•
The senate is still in control of the
republicans by a slim margin.
J. W. Bailey, newly elected senator
from North Carolina, will be seated
without a -contest, according to the
opinion of Senator Cameron Morrison,
his North Carolina teammate. George
Pritchard,
lGgisiaiur
from Texas, is the choice for speaker
of the house by the Democrats. The N
* minority leader is still in doubt. The
: democrats are expected to organize
1 the house with little difficulty.
North Carolina’s delegation to the
72nd congress will again be 100 per
cent democrats, with one new senator
and three new representatives.
Two of the new representatives,
however, have served in past con
gresses, and the only "freshmen” on
the North Carolina team will be Sena
tor Josiah W. Bailey, of Raleigh, and
Representatives Walter Lambeth tof
the seventh congressional district.
Senator Cameron Morrison of
Charlotte served a short while in the
71st congress following his appoint
ment to succeed the late Lee S. Over
man, as did Frank Hancock of Oxford
who filled the unexpired term of the
late Charles Manley Stedman, the last
Confederate veteran to serve in con
gress.
Zebulon Weaver, representing the
tenth district, and Major A. L. Bul
winkle, representing the ninth district,
.will return to congress after having
been unseated for one term by the
republicans.
The veterans—Lindsay Warren of
the first district; John H. Kerr of
the second district; Charles L. Ab
ernethy of the third district; Ed
ward William Pou of the fourth dis
trict; J. Bayard Clark of the sixth
district; Robert L Dough ton of the
eight district—will return to con
tinue their terms.
Pou will be the veteran member,
Jiaving served continuously since the
59th congress, and stands to get the
better committee appointments.
Bailey will succeed North Caro
lina's veteran senator—Furnifold Mc
Lendel Simmons—whom he defeated
in the 1930 democratic primaries. He
was elected over George M. Pritchard,
republican of Asheville, who in 1928
had defeated Zebulon Weaver, demo
crat, for his seat in the house.
Major A. L. Bulwinkle, in the 1930
elections, won back his seat from
Charles A. Jonas, republican.
CLINIC WILL BE HELD
Sanford—With members of the
Lee County Medical society 'giving
their services and only a nominal fee
being charged by the hospital for ex
penses, a tonsil clinic will be held at
the Lee county hospital Friday. Plans
have been perfected to hold these
clinic on the second and fourth Fri
days in each month.
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