North Carolina Newspapers

    \
The Oldest Newspaper Published In North Carolina
The Carolina Watchman
(tThe Watchman Carries a Summary of c_All The TSlgws”
Founded 1832-lOOth YearSALISBURY, FRIDAY MORNING, MARCH 11, 193 2 Vol. 27, No. 11 Price 2 Cents
102 Cases Tried By County Court In Three Weeks
i ft , A A a
RUM VIOLATIONS
LEAD DOCKET WITH
A TOTAL OF 41
Defendants Indicted For
Violations Of 26 Sepa
rate Criminal State Stat
utes.
IZ liNUlc; I tLU
FOR BREAKING
TRAFFIC LAWS
Interesting Summary Of
Court Activities Com
piled; Heavy Dockets
Disposed Of.
During the past three weeks 102
cases were disposed.of by Judge Clyde j
E. Gooch in the Rowan County Court.
Twenty-six criminal statute violations
were charged against the defendants
arranged before the court. The break
ing of the state prohibition laws again
led the docket as will be seen from the
following summary:
Drunk and disorderly - 23
Violation of prihibition laws -14
Driving while drunk - 4
Larceny and ^receiving -' - •• 8
Violation motor laws —:--- 8
ill f
lilCgdi kiam i lumg - - '
Speeding -- 5
Vagrancy --- 4
Violation city ordinances 3
Abandonment and non-support 3 |
Breaking and entering - 3
Assault with deadly weapon . 3
Seduction- -
Gambling --- *■
Reckless driving - 3
Assault - - 2
Carrying concealed weapons 2
Forcible trespass, fraud, worthless
checks, assault on female, inter
fering with electrical appliances,
operating gaming device, and
selling lottery tickets - 1 each
The docket for the week of Febru
ary 29th to March 5th, had the fol
lowing cases:
Carl Wright, drunk and violating
prohibition laws, $15 and costs in
both cases.
Red Crawford, carrying collated
weapon, not guilty.
William A. Allen, worthless cherks
judgment nisi.
C. C. Cummings, drunk, $5 anc
costs; carrying concealed weapon, $5C
and costs.
Lizzie Paul, drunk, 30 days n
workhouse.
R. L. Crawford, drunk, $5 anc
costs.
_ _ _ - If • t _ ^
D. W. McLaughlin, violating motor
laws, costs.
Jettie Wheeler, vagrancy, costs.
Stella Wheeler, vagrancy, judgment
nisi.
Roscoe Williams, violation prohibi
tion laws, assault on female and inter
fering with electrical appliances, 7
months on roads or fine of $175.
Jake Smith, larceny, not guilty.
Albert Edwards, Farnk Marcus and
William Meryl, illegal train riding, or
dered to leave county.
John Graham, violation motor laws,
costs.
A. G. McFayden, speeding, $15.
Bernard Spencer, speeding, costs.
Titteron Williams, assault, 20 days
or costs.
Irene Jeter, embezzlement, dismiss
ed on motion.
Bruce Sells, drunk, costs. _
Marvin James and Frank Webb, vi
olation prohibition laws, Webb, not
guilty; Jaimes, 70 days or $3 5.
Dot Neeley", Moyer Neely and Dit
McCoy, larceny and receiving, Dit
McCoy and Moyer Neeley, not guilty;
Dot Neeley, 30 days or $2 5.
J. C. Kesler, larceny, 30 days or
$25.
w. W. Batten, driving drunk, not
guilty. .
Boyd Stanfield and Frank Taylor,
(Please turn to back page)
Good
Morning
2
RATIONALIZATION
Your breath at my lips
Has been both warm and sharp.
Things were quite pleasant,
Till one brief moment ago:
Just the two of us,
And a cup of coffee.
Now you torment me ...
You are a woman:
Your dimensions .dissolve
Into the nothingness of air;
You are a flame at my fingertips.
Presently
I shall choke your being from you,
Othello-like. i
Fiercely , i
Will I tear that quick life away; i
And walk as I did before— i
Unashamed among my fellow men. <
Probably
I shall enjoy other cups of coffee 1
Just as much; 1
With other cigarets. Ei an LoJge. 1
- t
Old Lady (visiting prison)—Never t
mind, my friend, life is uncertain any
way. We are here today and gone to- t
morrow. o
Convict 2223—Well, lady you may t
be gone tomorrow but I won’t. c
A BIG HELP C
Dr. Carl S. Patton met a farmer P
who said he always drank 15 to 20 1
cups of strong coffee a day. "But,” c
inquired Dr. Patton, "doesn’t it keep 1
you awake?” To which the farmer
gave reply, "It helps.” 1 j
—The Convrcyationalnt. J
"I beg your pardon, sir, but what
j is your name?” the teller politely ask
ed the man presenting a check.
"Name,” replied the indignant cus
tomer, "don’t you see my signature on ^
the check?”
"I do,” answered the teller. That s
what aroused my curiosity.
BRRRR
He: I dreamt of you last night.
She: (coldly): Really!
He: Yes; then I woke up, shut the
window, and put an extra blanket on
the bed.—Tid-Bits.
FOUR THINGS
Four things a man must learn to do
If he would make his record true:
To think without confusion clearly;
To love his fellow-men sincerely;
To act from honest motives purely;
To trust in God and Heaven securely.
—Van Dyke.
THEY DON’T ANSWER
He had purchased a parrot which
, 1 • J _1 «--,r
was ratner a yuu.115 «-'**'-* -
ing to teach it to talk. He walked
close to the cage and said in a loud,
clear voice:
■"Hello! Hello! Hello there! Hello!”
He yelled until tired, the parrot pay
ing no attention to him. But when the
man stopped for breath, the parrot
opened one eye and said, "Line’s busy.
Susie—I hear Mary finally consent- '
ed to marry Sam Sapleigh.
Agnes—Yes, she found out he be
longed to a Christmas savings club.
THIS WILL NEVER DO
The young wife was heartbroken.
"What’s the matter?” asked a
friend.
"Oh, my husband is so absent
minded. After breakfast he left a tip
on the table and when I handed him
his hat he handed me another tip.’
"Well, that’s nothing to worry
about. It’s just a force of habit.”
"That’s what worries me. He kissed
me when I gave him his coat. • Santa
Fe.
TO WIN SUCCESS
Be brief—politely.
Be aggressive—tactfully.
Be emphatic—pleasantly.
Be positive—diplomatically.
Be right—graciously.
—Brooklyn Centra!.
Police Continue Frantic
Search For Little Lindv
There have been no new develop
ments in the search for the kidnapped
>on of Colonel Charles A. Lindbergh,
other than reports and discovery of
new clues by police which have failed
to materialize.
Kidnappers, it is reported, have not
fied Colonel Lindbergh that he must
cvait for a time safe and proper before
le can communicate with them and
tegotiate the return of his child.
Mrs. Lindbergh, mother of the miss
ng child, who has held up bravely
luring the past nine days since the
child was kidnapped, is reported to be
11 and breaking under the long strain
if uncertainty.
Renewed optimism prevailed at the
.indbergh home during the past 48
lours, and both Colonel and Mrs.
.indbergh expressed the belief that
he child would soon be returned to
hem unharmed, in the near future.
Despite a reported breach between
he colonel and police officials, the
fficers have continued diligent^ in
heir investigation of every detail in
pnnection with the case.
During the first part of the week,
oloncl Lindbergh made a direct ap
:a! to the underworld leaders, asfcirtg'
tern to negotiate, if possible, with the
hild stealers in the hope of iinchng
ae lost child.
Henderlite Kuns
For Commissioner
C. M. Henderlite Thursday formally
innounced his candidacy for the Dem
jcratic nomination for county com
nissioner from Salisbury township.
Mr. Henderlite has long been iden
:ified with Rowan county politics. He
seas mayor of Salisbury for four years
rnd had previously served two years as
:ouncilman.
For 19 years Mr. Henderlite was en
gaged in railroad work, having been
with the Southern Railway company
1S years and the Chesapeake and Ohio
four years. Mr. Henderlite is now en
gaged in the retail coal business.
MAN GETS JAIL SENTENCE
Wilmington—An unidentified man
sitting on the front row of the court
room took a bottle from his pocket
and took a long swill of liquor and
slumped in his seat. The judge sent
him to jail for contempt of court.
When the prisoner awakes and is able
to give his name, the jailer will tell
him of the little visit he will have.
’ STATE BANKERS TO MEET
Pinehurst—The 36th annual con
vention of the North Carolina Bank
ers Association will be held here at
Carolina hotel Thursday and Friday,
May 5 and 6.
Genius Rewarded
n
Dr. Irving Langmuir, wizard of
electrons, got $10,000 cash and a
gold medal for his improvements in
electric lamps, vacuum tubes and elec
tric welding.
Pie Champion
Fifteen-year-old Olive Charbon
neau of Vesper, Wis., won a $500
prize over competitors from four
states in a cherry-pie contest held in
Chicaeo.
Who’s Who In Rowan
OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF I
SALISBURY-SPENCER MINIS
TERIAL ASSOCIATION.
Officers
Rev. Marshall Woodson, president.
Rev. B. J. Wessinger, vice president.
Rev. W. T. Scott, secretary and
treasurer.
Members
Rev. Arch C. Cree, D. D., pastor
of the First Baptist church; Rev. Tom
Cook, pastor of the Second Presby
terian church; Rev. J. O. Cox, pastor
of the Baptist church at Granite Quar
ry,' N. C.; Rev. J. A. J. Farrington,
pastor of Park Avenue Methodist
church; Rev. J. W. Fitzgerald, pastor
of Coburn Memorial Methodist church;
Rev. M. W. Gordon^ D. D., pastor of
First Baptist church, Spencer; Captain
Houckstra of the Salvation Army;
Rev. Gilbreth Kerr, pastor of the A.
R. Presbyterian; Rev. Wade Johnson,
pastor First Methodist church, Spen
:er; Rev. Mark H. Milne, D. D., pas
:or St. Luke’s Episcopal church; Rev.
iank J. Peeler, pastor First Reformed
:hurch; Rev. J. L. Parks, pastor First
?resbyterian church, Spencer; Rev. C.
\. Rhyne, pastor Stallings Memorial
baptist church; Rev. A. L. Stanford,
D. D., pastor First Methodist church;
&.ev. M. L. Stirewalt, D. D., pastor St.
John’s Lutheran church; Rev. W. T.
Scott, pastor of the United Congrega
tionalist and Christian church; Rev.
H. C. Sprinkle, D. D., presiding elder
for Salisbury district; Rev. B. J. Wes
iinger, pastor Haven Lutheran church
and Rev. Marshall Woodson, pastor
First Presbyterian church.
MAN KILLS HIMSELF
Charlotte—Walter A. Aflen told hi;
wife to bring his shot gun so he coulc
sell it. He took the gun into his roorr
and killed himself.
NORTH CAROLINA
NEWS IN
BRIEF
*■" i >
TO NOTIFY CHIEFS
Raleigh—The chief of police in ev
ery strategic point will be notified in
the future when a prisoner makes an
escape from a prison camp.
SCHOOL GET& $20,000
Raleigh—St. Mary’s school will get
$20,000 from the estate of the late
W. A. Erwin, Durham textile mag
nate.
LEXINGTON FIRE LOSS
Lexington—Fire broke out in the
finishing department of a local chair
factory and did damage estimated at
$7,000.
_
MORRISON MUST FIGHT
Raleigh—Tam C. Bowie, in an in
terview here, stated that Senator Cam
eron Morrison must make a hard fight
if he is to retain his seat in the Unit
ed States senate.
FIREMEN CHOSE HAMLET
New Bern—Hamlet will be chosen
for the annual meeting of the North
Carolina Firemen’s association to be
held next August, says R. C. Whitley,
president of the association.
KILLED BY "UNLOADED” GUN
Raleigh—Pauline, 7-year-old daugh
ter of Mrs. Lillie A. Andrews, was
fatally injured by a bullet from an
"unloaded” rifle in the hands of her
brother, Carrie Andrews, age 14.
HOMICIDES INCREASE
Raleigh—There was an increase of
2 5 in the number of homiicdes in
North Carolina for 1931 when com
pared with 1930. In 1930 there were
304 homicides as compared with 329
last year.
ELECTRICIAN KILLED
Burlington—H. C. Klingenschmitt,
superintendent of the eastern division
of the Duke Power company, met in
stant death at the Eno steam power
plant when he came in contact with
a 13,000 volt primary line.
STATE BAR TO MEET
Raleigh—The North Carolina Bar
Association will hold its annual meet
ing in Asheville July 14 to 16, Henry
M. London, the secretary, said. Guy
Thompson, of St. Louis, president of
the American Bar Association, will be
the principal speaker.
FACTORY BRINGS $100,000
High Point—The Thomasville Chair
company planked down $100,000 in
cold cash and received therefor from
the Williams-Norris company of High
Point, factory number four located in
lhomasville. mere was anotner mu
of $84,000, indicating there is yet
faith in the furniture industry.
60,000 REPORTS DUE
Raleigh—Some 60,000 North Caro
linians are now laboring over individ
ual and corporation income tax returns
from which the state hopes to collect
$7,200,000 in revenue. The blanks
were sent out some time ago and
come due March 15.
NEGRO LOSES $700
Greenville—Mary Vines, local ne
gro woman, had sewed seven $100
bills in the lining of her coat and the
money represented her life’s savings.
A few days ago the coat was stolen
from the woman’s hands and as yet,
police have been unable^to locate it.
$30,000 FIRE LOSS
Charlotte—Fire swept through the
first floor of the Montgomery Ward
company in the first floor of the Duke
Power company building here Friday
night and did damage estimated at
$39,000. The building, of fireproof
construction, was'only slightly dam
aged.
WORLD’S LARGEST
TOWEL FACTORIES
GOING FULL BLAST
Day And Night Shifts
Employed To Fill Large
Orders Received By This
Company, It Is Report
ed.
LARGE PAYROLL IS
BOOSTING BUSINESS
IN THIS VICINITY
Many Idle Workers From
Rowan County Have
Found Employment In
Kannapolis Past Few
Weeks.
It is estimated that 7,500 employes
are now on the payroll of the Cannon
Manufacturing company at Kannap
olis, according to reports reaching The
Watchman.
This total comprises day and night
shifts, as the mills are in continuous
operation, it is stated.
Hundreds have been added to tbe
fomts Of this company wtttiin tbe past
few weeks.
No statement has been issued by
the officials of the company relative
to the number of employes but it is
known that the mills are operating on
a large scale.
It is understood that within the past
few weeks, the Cannon Manufactur
! ing company has received a number of
large orders and it is requiring day and
night shifts to handle this increased
volume of business.
The Cannon Manufacturing com
pany is the largest towel manufactur
ing company in the world and is one
of the largest plants in this country.
This company is also one of the larg
act r-i-v nnirare i r* Pnwin 3 nrl ClahumiS
r /
counties.
Many persons in Rowan county, who
has been idle because of their inability
to find employment, have obtained
work at Kannapolis during 'the past
week or two and others have applied
for work and expect to be given jobs
in the near future.
Kannapolis, according to the last
federal census, has a population of 13,
912. Hundreds of employes live out
side the city limits and in other ad
joining towns and counties, making
daily trips to and from work by au
tomobile.
This activity on the part of this
large company, has encouraged the
channels of business in this vicinity
and is expected to result in a substan
tial improvement of business condi
tions generally.
BODY OF MISSING MAN
Winston-Salem — The mysterious
disappearance of Jim Burris, Mt. Airy
•_! „ „ H J U/ir kaari cnl\r_
‘ J -X-/ -
ed with the finding of the man’s body
near here. The man’s head was batter
ed and the body was lying on the bank
of a creek. Money found in a pocket
of his clothing discounted the robbery
suggestion.
CLARENCE HICKEY ACCUSED
Burlington — Clarence Hickey is
charged with smuggling hacksaw
blades into the county jail and giving
them to Artell Hickey, young man .* '
who figured in the trial of the high
way robbery of J. A. Long, cashier
of the Bank of Haw River. Sheriff
Stockard received a tip in time to pre
vent the boy’s escape.
BIRD INJURES EYE
Lumberton—T. Dunn of Jersey
City, N. J., was driving along a high
way near here when a partridge flew
into his car arid struck him in the
eye. The bird was killed by the blow
and Mr. Dunn is here under the care
of a physician.
    

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