North Carolina Newspapers

    Hie Oldest Newspaper Published In North Carolina
The Carolina Watchman
"The Watchman Carries a Summary of ^All The Kletvs”,
Founded 1832-lOOth Year SALISBURY, FRIDAY MORNING, MARCH 25, 1932 Vol. 27, No. 13 Price 2 Cents
City Schools Will Complete Nine Months Term
% * % vp**’*0 • i • •
COUNTY CHAIRMAN
CALLS CONVENTION
FOR APRIL 11TH
Urges Republicans In The
County To Give United
Support To Successor In
Approaching Campaign.
JENNINGS MAY
RUN FOR SEAT
IN CONGRESS
Postmaster And Former
Solicitor O f County
Court Boomed For Seat
In National Body.
J. L. Rendleman, Jr., chairman of
the Rowan county Republican Exe
cutive Committee, will not be a can
didate to succeed himself, he told a
representative of The Watchman
Thursday night.
Mr. Rendleman stated that he
would continue to be active in the in
terests of the republican party of Row
an county, and urged that all repub
licans in the county give his succes
sor rfceir united support. ;
it was also learned by The Watch
man Thursday night that R. C. Jen
nings, local attorney and postmaster
and former solicitor of the Rowan
county court, will be a candidate for
congress from the ninth district. In
that event, it is believed that Mr.
Rendleman will be named to succeed
Mr. Jennings as state committeeman,
which position Mr. Jennings now
holds.
Mr. Rendleman Thursday issued the
call for the republican county con
vention which is set for April 11, in
the county courthouse, at 10 o’clock
a. m.
Mr. Rendlaman’s call follows:
"Pursuant to the plan of the Re
publican organization of North Caro
lina, I, John L. Rendleman, Jr., Chair
man of the Rowan County Republi
can Executive Committee, do hereby
call a Republican County Convention
to be held at the Rowan County Court
"House in the city of Salisbury, N. C.,
on Monday, April 11th, 1932, at 10:00
A. M., for the purpose of perfecting
an organization and for the transac
tion of any other business which may
properly come before said convention.
"Precinct primaries will be held at
the regular voting places at the fol
lowing times and dates:
"North Ward; South Ward; East
Ward; West Ward No. 1; West Ward
No. 2;—on Thursday, April 7th,
1932, at 7:30 P. M.
"Spencer; East Spencer; Cleveland;
—on Friday, April 8th, 1932, at 7:30
P. M.
"Bradshaw; Barnhardt’s Mill; Bos
tian Cross Roads; Enochville; Frank
lin; Faith; Gold Knob; Granite Quar
ry; Gold Hill; Hatter’s Shop; Locke;
Mt. Ulla; Morgan No. 1; Morgan No.
2; Rockwell; Steele; Sumner Scotch
Irish; Trading Ford; Unity; Landis;
. China Grove, on Saturday, April 9th,
1932, at 2:00 P. M.
"All Republicans are urged to at
tend their respective precinct prima
ries and county convention.
__ "JOHN L. RENDLEMAN, JR.,
Chairman Rowan County Republican
Executive Committee.”
STUDENTS WANT TO DANCE
Lenoir—Students at Lenoir-Rhyne
college have drawn up a petition for
presentation to the board of trustees
requesting the right to dance and play
cards.
NEW PEAK FOR PRISONS
Raleigh—'North Carolina’s highway
prison population reached a new high
peak in February with 5,537 convicts
on the roads. New prisoners for the
month totalled 1,050 while 96 5 were
released. x
WE HAD OUR FINGERS CROSSED
A little bird
Sat on a tree
And sang a song
Of spring to me.
It sang, I think,
Of longer days
And tingling roots
And warmer rays
And gentle winds
And sap aflow
And swelling buds
That soon will blow.
It sang to me
Of greening hills
And babbling brooks
And laughing rills.
But, shucks, I’ve%heard
That stuff before
And nowadays
I bite no more.
For now I know
The song I heard
Was warbled by
A lyre bird.
IGNORE THE DUMB-BELLS
"Prisoner, the jury finds you guil
ty-”
"That’s all right, Judge. I know
you’re too intelligent to be influenced
by what they say."
"Yes, Robert, 'amo’ is the Latin
word meaning 'I love.’ Now what
word suggests its opposite?”
"Reno.”
y 1 ’
A GOOD COMPROMISE
"When we first got married my'
wife and I quarreled for a year about
whether we should buy an automobile!
or a horse and buggy.”
"How did you settle it?”
"We compromised on a baby car-1
riage.”
Officer—Young lady, L’m afraid
I’ll have to run you in.
Lady—Oh, never mind, officer. I
can get home by myself all right.
IT SHOULD HELP
Wife: "You seem disappointed with
your parcel.”
Jdusband: "Yes. I answered an ad
vertisement for a device to keep down
gas bills, and the firm sent me a pa
perweight.”
Reno Lady—I want to get a mar
riage license.
Clerk—You’ll have to show your di
vorce decree.
Reno Lady—But I haven’t ever been
married.
Clerk—Sorry then, Madam, but no
one but residents can get licenses here.
—The Pathfinder.
UP TO DATE VERSION
Say, Joe, can you tell me why there
are fewer railroad accidents than auto
accidents?
Joe—Well, perhaps, not exactly, but
I think the main reason is because the
engineer isn’t always hugging the fire
man.
Junewed—Do you ever read in bed?
Oldwed—Not now. I often lie a
wake listening to a lecture, though.
MESSAGE
Woman Caller: "Is the manager in?”
Office Boy: "No, he has gone out
to luhch with his wife.”
Woman Caller: "I see. When he gets
back with his stenographer tell him
his wife called.”—Erie Railroad Maga
zine.
HUMOR
From the Tennessee Tar
Automobiles, you’ll observe,
Very seldom hallt or swerve
When a helpless child at play
Or old man’s in the way;
But wild drivers hesitate,
Slam on brakes and gladly wait
When a flapper, chic and sweet,
Saunters out to cross the street.
Election Board Chairman
Denies Fraud In County
Positive denial of allegations made
by George M. Pritchard, republican
candidate for senator in 1930, in his
contest against Senator J. W. Bailey,
as filed in Washington recently, re
garding the conduct of the election in
Rowan county, was made Thursday
by E. C. Gregory, chairman of the
board of elections of Rowan county.
"I do not believe a fairer and clean
er election was ever held in the coun
ty,” said Mr. Gregory when published
charges were called to his attention.
Mr. Gregory declared in part:
"The federal secret service men who
spent several days last year in Rowan
county investigating the 1930 elections
and primary told me afterwards that
the Rowan county registration books
and election records had been kept bet
ter and more closely according to law
than had the books and records of the
large number of other counties they
had investigated in North Carolina.
And they said they would so report to
the Washington authorities who had
sent them here to make the investiga
tion. Our 31 ballot boxes and the bal
lots had all been carefully preserved as
the law prescribed; and they were
promptly turned over to these federal
officers wNNV they come to 'examine
them.
Rowan county tor years has enjoy
ed the reputation of fair elections;
and there has never been any charge
of irregularities or fraud in any of iti
primaries or elections. Our elections
are free; and our count absolutely fair.
Our election officials do everything
in their power to keep it so. Our vot
ing is secret under the Australian elec
tion ballot in the booth. Each voter is
handed a ballot and he goes into a clos
ed election booth and secretly and pri
vately marks his ballot without any
interference or suggestion from any
one whatsoever.
"Neither the Democrats nor the Re
publicans attempt in this county to in
timidate or coerce any voter. Of course
during the political campaign each
party properly argues his case; but on
election day each voter goes to the
booth and privately and secretly votes
his or her own sentiments.
"It is not true that '40 or 50 absen
tee ballots’ were counted in one pre
cinct where the voter had not endors
ed his name on the ballot.
"It is as much a reflection on the
Republican judge and watchers of el
ection as it is on the Democrats for
such a charge to be made for the first
time at this late day nearly two years
after the election. In Rowan county
the 412 absentee votes were nearly
equally cast for Democratic and Re
publican tickets.
"First charge: Intimidation Repub
lican mill workers and threat to lose
their jobs if didn’t vote Democratic
ticket. (Untrue).
"Second charge: 40 absentee ballots
counted where voter had not signed
ballot. (Untrue).”
Many Candidates
Seeking Rowan
County Offices
Seven candidates for county offices
announced during the past week. They
follow:
J. H. McKenzie, sheriff.
J. H. Krider, sheriff.
W. D. Kizziah, register of deeds.
Miss Carrie D. Rothrock, register of
deeds.
George R. Uzzell, house of repre
sentatives.
J. Allen Dunn, judge county court.
Dougall M. McLean, county com
missioner.
Others who had previously an
nounced are as follows:
H. E. Isenhour, Curtis A. Long,
Max L. Barker, C. L. Neel, and C. M.
Henderlite, for county commissioner.
W. V. Harrunjp^osecuting attorney.
K. W. Umberger, bouse of repre
sentatives.
E. W. G. Huffman, state senate.
Mr. McKenzie’s announcement came
in the form of a letter of resignation
as commander of the Samuel C. Hart
post of the American Legion, stating,
that his action was in keeping with
the non-political spirit of the organi
zation and in order that he might be
come an active candidate for the Dem
ocratic nomination for sheriff of Row
an county. The letter was addressed to
the executive committee of the local
post.
Mr. McKenzie is a brother of the
late Sheriff W. Locke McKenzie, un
der whom he served. He is at present
general manager of Rowan Hardware
company.
J. H. Krider, former sheriff of Row
an county for 14 years, also definitely
announced his candidacy for that of
fice.
W. D. Kizziah, who is now serving
his first term as register of deeds of
this county, announced his candidacy
for re-election.
Miss Carrie D. Rothrock, school
teacher, candidate for register of deeds,
is a newcomer in Rowan politics.
George R. Uzzell, local attorney, is
seeking re-election to the house of rep
resentatives. Mr. Uzzell has served one
term in the legislature.
J. Allen Dunn, Salisbury attorney,
solicitor of the county court for the
past two years, is seeking the judgeship
of the Rowan county court.
Dougall M. McLean, Salisbury mer
chant and business man, had announc
ed his candidacy for a place on the
board of county commissioners.
Who’s Who In Rowan
OFFICIALS OF KNIGHTS TEMP
LARS AND ROYAL SELECT
MASTERS
W. C. Taylor, eminent command
er.
M. L. Gantt, generalissimo.
B. R. Brown, captain general.
A. L. Smoot, prelate.
J. G. Hudson, treasurer.
J. W. Payne, recorder.
A. J. Geymayel, senior warden.
Charles Heilig, junior warden.
W. W. Folger, warden.
Council: A. J. Gemayel, thrice il
lustrious master; M. L. Gantt, dep
uty master; A. L. Smoot, principal
conductor of the works; W. C. Tay
lor, captain of the guard; J. F. Har
relson, conductor of the council; F.
J. Murdoch, steward; J. G. Hudson,
treasurer; J. W. Payne, recorder.
THIS IS FOREST WEEK
Raleigh — North Carolina Forest
week and Arbor and Bird day will
feature programs in schools and civic
and fraternal organizations during the
period of March 13 to 19. The obser
vation has been planned by State For
ester J. S. Holmes.
- ■ ■ ■ . --- — ■■ ■
MAN BLOWN TO BITS
Tryon—Dr. E. F. Bell, 5 5, of Spar
tanburg, S. C., was blown to pieces
on Melroe mountain near here when
several sticks of dynamite he was car
rying, exploded.
MANY SEEK LOANS
Charlotte—The Reconstruction Fi
nance Corporation’s agency here has
in hand or in immediate prospect ap
plications for loans totaling approxi
mately $12,000,000.
NORTH CAROLINA
NEWS IN
BRIEF
MAN KILLED BY TREE
Marshville—Hampton Godwin, 54,
farmer, was almost instantly killed
when a tree he was felling for stove
wood, struck another, causing the butt
of the falling tree to strike him in the
head.
BANDITS ENTER HOME
Belmont—Two masked bandits en
tered the home of Richard Wooten,
bound and gagged and beat Mrs. Woo
ten and rifled the house. One of the
robbers stood guard, the woman said,
while the other ransacked the house.
UNCERTAIN ABOUT FAIR
Raleigh—The matter of holding a
state fair this fall will not be deter
mined until June. The salary of T. B.
Smith, secretary-manager of the fair,
gave up his office due to elimination
of his salary by the budget bureau.
TWO HURT BY WHISKY CAR
Greensboro—Two persons were hurt
and 15 gallons of whisky confiscated
as an aftermath of an automobile col
lision on a street here. The two men
were accompanied by a woman, who
made her escape.
HEADQUARTERS opened
Raleigh—Temporary National head
quarters for the Young Democratic
clubs of America are now open in Ral
eigh. Mrs. James L. Scott, former vice
chairman of the North Carolina or
ganization of young Democrats, is in
charge.
FIRE AT STATESVILLE
Statesville—A large brick store
building was gutted by fire of un
known origin here Saturday night.
Every member of Statesville’s regular
and volunteer fire department battled
the flames for an hour and a half.
$25,000 FIRE DAMAGE
Smitihfield—Banner warehouse was
gutted by fire early Sunday morning,
entailing a loss of $25,000. The blaze
apparently started in the back of the
building where a quantity of cotton
was stored.
_
DISCARD FRESHMAN CAPS
Wake Forest—After ten years, the
student body of Wake Forest college
voted almost unanimously to discard
the custom of having freshmen wear
yellow and gold caps. A bon fire will
be made of the little skull caps some
time before the Easter holidays.
MAN HELD IN SLAYING
Mt. Airy—Clarke Yorke, 32, was
ordered held without bond for grand
jury action after a preliminary hear
ing in the slaying of Jim Burrus, taxi
driver, whose body was found near
here several days after he disappeared
in company with Yorke.
JUDGE TO IMPOUND CARS
Charlotte—Judge B. S. Whiting of
city court says henceforth he will im
pound automobiles of persons convict
ed of driving while drunk. The ma
chines will be impounded during the
period of the revocation of the driv
er’s license.
BOY SHOT IN EYE ~
Lenoir—Billy Sharpe, 12, was shot
in the eye with an air rifle when he
and a group of friends were playing
"war” with sticks, rifles and rocks.
The youth has a fighting chance of
recovering his sight in that eye.
N. C. MERCHANTS MEETING
Asheville—The North Carolina Mer
chants association will hold its annual
summer meeting here June 6 and 7.
This is expected to be the large* and
best meeting of the organization ever
held in North Carolina due to the im
pending fight in the 193 3 state legis
lature over the question of a sales tax
levy.
MAYOR HEDRICK
BELIEVES FUNDS
CAN BE RAISED
Bond Issue May Be Neces
sary To Cover Deficit of
$22,000 Which Has Ex
isted For Several Years.
STATEMENT QUIETS
RUMORS SCHOOLS
MAY BE CLOSED
Stable Linn, School Board
Chairman, And Superin
tendent Coltrane Also
Optimistic.
The city schools of Salisbury will
operate the full scheduled nine months,
in the opinion of B. V. Hedrick, may
or, who was optimistic in spite of a
$22,000 deficit staring the school
budget in the face.
Mr. Hedrick’s statement will put at
rest rumors which have been circulat
ed in Salisbury during the past few
I days to the effect that the schools
wttl not be able M operate oeet te™,
and one half months.
A bond issue, the mayor stated, may
be necessary to avoid the shortening
of the schools this year, but he felt
this would be successful.
The city council and the city board
of education are working together in
the hope of completing the regular 9
months scheduled term.
The following statement was given
The Watchman by Mayor Hedrick
| Thursday night:
"Owing to certain statements be
ing circulated over town relative to
the closing of the city schools at the
end of seven and a half months, I, as
mayor, should state that I feel our city
schools will continue to operate
through the full nine months, and ev
erything that is possible is being done
by the city board to raise the money
in co-operation with the school board
to complete the scheduled nine months
term.
"The only question that seems to
confront the two boards at this time
is the deficit of $22,000.00 which has
existed over a period of several years
and I feel sure that this deficit is go
ing to be worked out through the sale
of a like amount of bonds to our lo
cal people to take care of this deficit.
"If this bond sale does not material
ize, I feel sure that some other solu
tion can be worked out.”
Stahle Linn, chairman of the city
school board, and Superintendent E.
J. Coltrane, last night also expressed
the hope and belief that the schools
would operate the full nine months
term as scheduled.
ROWAN SCHOOLS
NEED ELEVEN NEW
. BUSES, HASTY SAYS
Supt. S. G. Hasty, of the county
schools, has recommended the purchase
of 11 new buses for Rowan county
schools. Six would be used for replac
ing the old ones no<w used while five
would be new.
His recommendations were as fol
low^
Woodleaf—one additional.
Cleveland—one additional.
Mt. Ulla—one additional.
Granite Quarry—one additional.
Landis—one additional.
Replacements are to be made at the
close of the current year, according to
Mr. Hasty, as follows:
China Grove—three.
Dukeville—two.
Cleveland—one.
    

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