North Carolina Newspapers

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The Oldest Newspaper Published In North Carolina
The Carolina Watchman
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"The Watchman Carries a Summary of cAll The Hews”
Founded 1832-100th Year SALISBURY, FRIDAY MORNING, APRIL 22, 1932 Vol. 27, No. 17 Price 2 Cents
Good
Morning
AINT IT THE TRUTH?
A thing that often
Gets my goat
Is some smart chap
Laughing at my old boat.
Another item that
Has my goat
Are worn-out trousers
And a real good coat.
To remedy that
Says Mr. Bousers
Buy a fine suit
With two pair of trousers.
The one sure route
To disgrace and fame
Is to get yourself mentioned
In "She Ain’t Got No Name.”
HAS HE A CAST IN HIS EYE?
Fortune Teller—"You are going to
marry a tall, dark man.”
The Girl—"Can’t you be specific?
All four of them are tall and dark”.—
Boston Transcript.
LAUGHABLE IN THE EXTREME
Isn’t it funny
That some men
Will get up in the morning
Shave with an advertised razor
And advertised soap
Put on an advertised underwear
Seat themselves at the table
And eat an advertised breakfast
food
Drink advertised coffee or substi
tutes
Put bn an advertised hat
Light an advertised cigar
Go to their places of business in an
advertised car
And turn down an advertising
proposition
On the ground that
Advertising doesn’t pay?
Isn’t it funny?—Newport (Ark.)
Independent.
LIES, LIES AND MORE LIES
Here’s an estimated list of the type
of liars and the number of lies told in
a day:
Intentional lies -254,654
Accidental lies - 60
Plains __—453,233
Damms _654,888
White lies _222,111
Gossip lies -333,444
Alibi lies—by males -666,888
Alibi lies—by females- NONE
In conference lies -777,222
Detained at office lies -999,999
Black lies _111,111
Courthouse lies -234,543
Pay-you-Saturday lies -899,988
Gambling lies -333,456
Just-as^good lies -322,223
Cockeyed lies --- 999
Miscellaneous lies --—999,999
Statistical lies -900,000
PUTTING THE OLD TOWN ON
THE MAP
I’ve lived a long and happy life,
Been here and there for many a year,
But am always glad w^en I get back
To find the old town on the map—
Put there by some aspiring soul
Who yearned to serve his fellow man
And lead him onward to the goal—
The lime-light and grand stand.
' At her ripe age, it would appear
She’d stay put and never stir.
The surmise’s wrong for everyone
Still strives to get her on the map,
Like the onery horse to water led—
A fact proclaimed from earliest
time—
It wouldn’t drink, only snort and snap
Same as the old town at map!
I wonder why our fathers failed
To plant their town on stabli
ground?
Chasing Indians? red coats mayhap?
Or blazing trails, forgot the map'
Years followed years—time to ge
right—
But they flew the coop, began ti
fight
In sixty, hence this oversight
To put the old town on the map!
Mrs. B. S. Moore
Election Board Selects Registrars, Judges
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MACHINERY SET
IN ACTION FOR
JUNE PRIMARY
Registrars To Open Their
Books April 30; Those
Desirous Of Voting May
Register With The Prop
er Officials.
CANDIDATES FOR
VARIOUS OFFICES
MAY FILE NOW
All Judges And Registrars
Named With The Ex
ception Of One Repub
lican Judge For Yadkin
Precinct.
With the exception of one republi
can judge from Yadkin precinct, the
list of judges and registrars for Rowan
county has been completed.
Following is a list of the various
judges and registrars for their respec
tive precincts^ named Thursday by the
Rowan County Board of Elections:
Bernhardt’s Mill
Z. Augustus Kluttz, registrar;
Charles A. Holshouser, judge; C. M.
Brown, judge.
Bostian’s Crossroads
J. B. Park, registrar; W. L. Ritchie,
judge; Henry Castor, judge.
Bradshaw’s
Chester C. Deal, registrar; Henry
J. Barnhardt, judge; L. A. Karriker,
judge.
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K^rjtnu kji vi/t
S. Worth Freeze, registrar; B. H.
Miller, judge; Carl Sloop, judge.
Cleveland
Joe M. Bruner, registrar; S. K. Car
son, judge; T. J. Felker, judge.
East Spencer
Harold Q. Sides, registrar; J. H.
Page, judge; Ross Poole, judge.
Enochville
A. LeRoy Karriker, registrar; Hen
derson H. Overcash, judge; A. L.
Ritchie, judge.
Faith
Walter Rainey, registrar; E. L. Ag
ner, judge; Roscoe Barger, judge.
Franklin
John C. Kennerly, registrar; Sam
uel Shuping, judge; A. E. Myers, judge.
(Please turn to back page)
State Bible
Students To
Begin Meet
The 21st annual convention of the
Baraca-Philathea opened here Friday
morning with hundreds of North Car
olina delegates in attendance.
O. A. Johnson, of Durham, is the
president of the state Bafaca class and
Mrs. B. V. Hedrick, of Salisbury, is
president of the Philathea group.
The convention will be in session
for 3 days, April 22, 23, and 24th.
l)r. J. B. Council
Died Here Thur.
Dr. J. B. Council, aged 76, died at
his home, 202 West Fisher street, early
: Thursday morning. Dr. Council had
been in ill health for some months.
The funeral will be conducted today
' from the home with the Rev. Marshall
Woodson of the First Presbyterian
; church officiating. He will be assisted
by Archdeacon W. H. Hardin. Inter
> ment will take place in the Chestnut
Hill cemetery.
Surviving Dr. Council is a wife,
formerly Miss Bessie Krider, two sons
. and two daughters.
_ .uv-v_
• ta,o
Whe^#rt*> >»-th Carolina Leads
North Carolina has the largest towel mills in the world,
with headquarters at Kannapolis, producing 600,000 towels
per day. As far as the lines of civilization extend, the "Can
non” brand is known.
North Carolina has the largest denim mills in the world,
the Cone mills at Greensboro.
North Carolina has the largest damask mills in the world,
Rosemary Manufacturing Company, Rosemary.
North Carolina produces more tobacco than any other state
in the union, and manufactures more tobacco than all other
states combined.
North Carolina produces more peanuts than any other
state.
North Carolina produces more mica than any other state
in the union, and ranks first in quality of feldspar.
North Carolina has developed more electric horsepower
than any state in the South.
North Carolina has the largest pulp mills in the United
States, Champion Fibre Co., Canton, N. C.
North Carolina has the largest hosiery mills in the world,
Durham Hosiery Mills, Durham.
North Carolina has more cotton textile mills and makes a
wider variety of textile products than any other state in the
union.
North Carolina operates more spindle hours than any state
in the union.
North Carolina is second in the number of spindles.
North Carolina makes more wooden bedroom furniture
than any state in the union.
North Carolina has the largest heavyweight underwear
mills in the union, P. H. Hanes Knitting Co., Winston-Salem.
North Carolina has the largest tobacco manufacturing
plant in the world, R. J. Reynolds Tobacco^Co., which ships
eighteen thousand solid carloads of tobacco products each year
to all quarters of the globe.
North Carolina has a wider variety of soil and produces a
wider variety of grain, fruit and vegetable crops than any
other state.
North Carolina has the largest aluminum plant in the
world, at Badin.
North Carolina is the largest cordage and twine manufac
turer in the United States.
North Carolina has more miscellaneous manufacturing
plants than any other state in the union.
North Carolina pays more federal tax to the government
than all of the original thirteen colonies combined, including
Virginia, and is surpassed in amount only by three states.
North Carolina leads the entire southern states in furniture
manufacture and is surpassed in the United States by only one
state.
North Carolina leads all states in variety of native precious
stones.
ARREST VALDESE MURDERER
Valdese—Alvin Eller, 23, was ar
rested in Los Angeles as one of the
parties robbing the store of Gus Bon
ous at Valdese, this state, on February
18, and fatally shooting him. Valdese
officials suspected Eller and notified
the California authorities. Eller impli
cated Dwight Beard, a Lenoir youth,
and one other.
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HOTEL BURNS
Jackson Springs—Fire destroyed the
Jackson Springs hotel and annex late
Wednesday, damage estimated at $75,
000. The hotel of 102 rooms was being
made ready for openng in ten days.
Recently, the property passed into the
hands of a Mr. Welch, of Southern
Pines. This Moore county resort has
been popular for several years.
I
Sitting On Top Of The World
Salisbury and Rowan county are sitting on top of the
world. In many ways the depression has touched her commun
ities lightly.
In Rowan county there are several thousands people at
gainful employment.
Our financial institutions are solid and well managed.
It is possible for our people to stimulate trade and com
merce by a very simple medium.
Thousands and thousands of dollars are sent out of Row
an county during twelve months period. For no better reason
than many folks believe the green fields are over the hill while
in reality they are at our very door. Every dollar spent among
outside merchants in a measure is a lost dollar. It ceases to
function for the good of Rowan county.
Local merchants can quote prices that are a match for
any mercantile institution for style and quality. \W'e believe
prices are lower than many others on account of rent and
small overhead expenses.
As your ship is located in Rowan county it would be to
your interest to become enthusiastically imbued with a spirit
of loyalty to Rowan county and its best interests.
ORE VALUED AT
8,000 PER TON
IS BEING MINED
New Vein Discovered Af
ter Sinking Shaft Sixty
Feet; Extensive Opera
tions Carried On Since
Last Fall.
FIRST TIME IN
HISTORY FREE
GOLD IS FOUND
Mining Interest Leased
For 10 Years; Areas Lies
In Counties Of Rowan,
Cabarrus And Stanly.
Ore, valued at $8,000 per ton, is
being mined by the Rowan Mining
Corporation at Gold Hill, according
to H. H. Green, manager, and mining
engineer.
For the first time in the history of
mining operations in Gold Hill you are
able to see free gold sticking out of
the ore. ,
This ore was discovered after sink
iog a shaft 6(1 feet into the ground,!
it is stated. Be sinking of this shalt
was started last fall.
Another shaft is being sunk about
a quarter of a mile beyond the first
shaft. Ore from this shaft is valued
at $50 to $100 per ton.
The Rowan Mining Corporation was
organized last August. Extensive min
ing operations have been carried on at
Gold Hill by this company.
A large force of men are employed
daily. At one time as many as,29 were
on the payroll. Since last August this
company has paid over $7,400 in pay
rolls.
This company has leased for ten
years 900 acres in fee and the min
eral interests in 600 additional acres.
This land lies in three counties, Row
an, Cabarrus and Stanly. The bulk of
the land is situated in Rowan county.
The lease is based on royalties, the
company paying to the owners a cer
tain amount of the gold mined.
The work is being conducted under
the supervision of H. H. Green, min
ing engineer of 34 years experience.
Several shafts have been sunk and
the work is done underground. A
small railway track is used to haul the
ore.
The offices and equipment operated
by Walter George Newman are being
used by this new corporation.
The first gold mine was opened in
Gold Hill in 1842. It was called the
Gold Hill Mines. The town of Gold
Hill was later named after this mine.
Delay Naming
City Manager.
Until June 1
Appointment of a successor to R.
Lee Mahaley, former city manager of
Salisbury, who resigned recently, will
be delayed until the close of the fiscal
year, according to an announcement
by Mayor B. V. Hedrick. This move is
being made in the interest of economy
and until the appointment of a new
manager B. V. Hedrick will discharge
the duties of the office.
The city council will meek this
morning to appoint a successor to J
M. McCorkle, city councilman, whc
recently resigned. His successor wil
probably be selected out of the follow
ing list: Sam Carter, John Crawford
Hayden Holmes, J. R. Maynard, J. E
Hennessee and J. K. Dorsett.
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News Briefs
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FAMOUS DETECTIVE DIES
William J. Burns, 71, world famed
detective, died at his home at Sarasota,
Fla., on night of April 14.
DIES IN CHURCH
Statesville—Jesse L. Sherrill, former
sheriff of Iredell, died suddenly in
Broad Street Methodist church Tues
day while attending a meeting of di
rectors.
DONATES $25,000
Wilmington — Mrs. Jessie Kenan
Wise, of Wilmington, has donated
$25,000 to the emergency student loan
fund, as announced by President Gra
ham of the State University.
STUDENT DEAD IN HIS ROOM
Chapel Hill—John A. Nicolson, of
Raleigh, university sophomore, was
found dead in his room late Tuesday.
A coroner’s jury gave a verdict of
probable suicide.
FORMER RECRUITING OFFICER
IN JAIL
Bill Aycock, former recruiting of
ficer in Gastonia was being held in
jail at Clover, S. C., last week under
charge of violating the prohibition
laws.
ci avx:
| 111 feeling of long standing between
Albert Cline and B. F. Wiley, of up
per Mecklenburg county, led to the
fatal shooting of Wiley by his neigh
bor. Wiley was 82 year? old and a
farmer.
WINTER ON GULF COAST
Winter weather took another slap
at the Gulf Coast region on Monday
night when temperatures fell to 43
degrees. The New Orleans bureau
stated that not in 60 years has it reg
istered so low there at this season.
SAFE ROBBED
Lowell—A safe in the office of Cen
tral Oil company was robbed of $600
Tuesday. The yeggs knocked off the
combination and then drove the lock
pin in to open the safe. Half the mon
ey was said to be in checks.
ROBBERS FIRE STORE
Statesville—H. M. Robinson’s gen
eral store four miles west of States
ville was destroyed by fire early Wed
nesday. Evidence pointed to the fact
that the store was first robbed and
then set fire. Five thousand dollars
loss, insured for one-half, was incur
red.
ARREST BANK ROBBERS
North Wilkesboro—Paul King and
wife and Everett Collins are being held
here on charges of robbing a bank at
Republic, Mo. They were at home here
of a relative of Mrs. King, when ad
vice was received from Missouri of
ficers to arrest them.
DOUGHTON TO BE LOAN
OFFICIAL
J. K. Doughton, son of R. A.
Doughton of this state, has been ap
pointed manager of the Richmond,
Va., loan agency of the Reconstruc
tion Finance corporation, succeeding
R. H. Broadus, deputy governor of
the Federal Reserve bank of Richmond.
CANNON MILLS SHOW GAIN
Kannapolis—More than $500,000
was shown in the net income of the
Cannon Mills company in 1931 over
the previous year. The 1931 net in
come was reported at a meeting here
Tuesday of the stockholders was $2,
088,917.54, as against $1,544,638.02
for 1930. Total assets were reported
as $34,422,027.93. T. T. Smith was
elected secretary, replacing F. J. Hay
wood, of Concord. The latter recent
ly became vice president and trust of
ficer of the Cabarrus Bank and Trust
company. C. A. Cannon, of Concord,
was re-elected president, as also the
other officers and directors.
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