North Carolina Newspapers

    The Oldest Newspaper Published In North Carolina
The Carolina Watchman
"The Watchman Carries a Summary of cAll The TS[ews”
Founded 1832-100th Year SALISBURY, FRIDAY MORNING, MAY 20, 1932 Vol. 27, No. 21 Price 2 Cents
81 TO GRADUATE
FROM CATAWBA;
LARGEST CLASS
Institution To Hold Sev
enty-ninth Commence
ment Exercises Next
Week.
DR. HOLTON, OF
DUKE, SPEAKER
FOR OCCASION
Many Expected To Be
Present For The Annual
Alumni Dinner Monday
Evening.
The seventy-ninth commencement
of Catawba college will take place on
May 24. The class this year numbers
eighty-one graduates and is the larg
est in the history of the college.
-1 and Mrs. Howard R.
Omwake in their spacious and beau
tiful home.
On Sunday, May 22, the Reverend
Richard C. Schiedt, Ph.D., Sc.D.,
Marshal college, will deliver the bac
calaureate sermon in the college chap
el. Dr. Schiedt is an outstanding the
ologian and an accomplished scholar.
In the evening at the Brodbeck Con
servatory of Music a recital by Em
ily Wilkins, pupil in expression, and
Pearl Marshall, pupil in piano and
voice, will be given.
On Monday, May 23, at 10 a. m.,
there will be a tennis tournament. In
the afternoon at 3 o’clock, there is a
meeting of the Alumni association and
at 4 o’clock the class day will be held.
In the evening at 6 p. m., about three
hundred alumni are expected to re
turn for the annual Alumni dinner.
John C. Carpenter, president of the
Alumni association, will preside. Af
ter this dinner the Blue Masque, the
dramatic organization of the college,
will present Sir James Barrie’s most
famous and popular comedy, The Ad
mirable Crichton.
The annual commencement will oc
cur on Tuesday, May 24. The speak
er for this occasion is Dr. Holland
Holton, professor of the history and
science of education, of Duke Uni
versity. Dr. Holton is a nationally
known authority in his field and a
speaker of brilliance and power.
The public is cordially invited to be
present at the baccalaureate service,
the class day, the play, and the com
mencement.
Good
Morning
RESOLUTION
Some day next week,
Or maybe next month,
I am going to find an hour
Without duties;
And during that hour
I am going to retire to a place
Without a telephone
Or a typewriter
Or a callers’ chair
Or a book or a radio.
And during that sixty minutes
Of freedom
I am going to think!
I wonder what it will be like!
Perhaps the unwonted exercise
May produce a real poem,
Or a real essay or criticism,
Or scheme for consecutive
And logical work;
Or I may go to sleep from exhaustion
After thinking for five minutes—
In any case it will be a great gain!
SHE’S BEEN FELT!
The girl with die most sex appeal
in all America is "Miss
"I must see the doctor today—I
don’t like the looks of my wife.”
"I’ll come with you—I can’t bear
the sight of mine,, either.”
HE’S EASY TO PLEASE
Judge: "Prisoner, have you any
thing to say before I pass sentence?”
Prisoner: "No, Your Honor, except
that it takes very little to please me.”
HE WAS FRESH; SHE GAVE IN!
"Was he fresh?”
"I’ll say—I hadda slap him three
times before I gave in!”
WEATHER PERMITTING
Golf Novice (after her first stroke) :
"When do I use the putter”
Instructor: "Some tine after dark,
I hope.”
"Does your husband ever take your
little hand in his?”
"Yes, and twists it until I drop the
gun.”
Boss (hiring new typist)—What’s
your speed?
Fair, Young Applicant—On type
writer or in a roadster?
Bayne—Say, doctor, my girl has
sore feet. What would you suggest?
Doctor—Rubber heels.
Bayne—What with?
Wife—Robert.
Hypnotist—Yes, dear.
| Wife—I wish you would come here
I and tell baby he’s asleep.
_Will She Be First to Wed?_
At Wellesley College for women, tradition is that the girl who wins the
annual hoop-rolling contest will be thf first bride of her class. Mijdred
Marcy of Newton Lower Palls. Mass.. »s this year’s smiling winner
. ■>
Tam C. Bowie To
Speak At County
Court House Today
use®* ■
TAM C. BOWIE
Tam C. Bowie, of West Jefferson,
N. C., candidate for United States
Senate on the Democratic ticket from
the 12th Congressional District, will
speak to the citizens of Salisbury in
the county court house at 2:00 o’clock
today.
Mr. Bowie has the reputation of be
ing an able speaker and at his address
this afternoon will discuss his plat
form and current issues of the day.
I . .- "'1
News Briefs
> *
$25,000 SMITHFIELD FIRE
A $25,000 fire at Smithfield, Sat
urday, burned the branch plant of
the Texas Oil Company and a filling
station.
FALL IS FATAL
A fall from a ladder used in paint
ing his home was fatal in Washington,
D. C., Saturday, for Arthur C. Ly
srly, 47, native of Rowan county,
$50,000 FIRE AT CONCORD
Loss of $50,000, two-thirds cover
id by insurance, was made at Concord,
Friday, by a fire which virtually wip
id out the Niblock lumber company.
BURLINGTON BANK REOPENS
The National bank, of Burlington,
apened its doors Monday as successor
to the First National bank which
closed early in the year.
ands were injured in a hurricane which
swept the tip of the state of Annam,
Indo-China, last week.
HOLD 3 FOR SHOOTING
Jack Thomas, Elwood Johnson and
Lawrence Armstrong were bound to
the higher court in preliminary trial
at Chapel Hill, Friday. Thomas, rec
ently taken in New York, was named
by Ashby Penn, university student,
as the man who shot him as Penn
aided in an effort to arrest four men
for an attempted robbery. Robert
Thompson is the man not yet caught.
P. & N. To Renew
Fight For Extension
Through Carolinas
Despite the final decision handed
down from the United States supreme
court, officials of the Piedmont &
Northern railroad have definitely de
cided to renew the fight for the right
to extend their line through North
and South Carolina, according to cur
rent reports.
The case, only recently argued, was
brought before the highest tribunal
on a writ of certiorari directly from
the district court, seven steam rail
roads joining with the Interstate
Commerce Commission in asking that
the lower court be sustained.
In reviewing the case, the supreme
court held that the P. & N. is engag
ed in general transportation of freight
and passengers in interstate commerce
and, therefore, came within the inter
state commerce act.
Continuing the court said:
"The petitioner’s railway is of such
importance in interstate commerce and
renders a service so predominantly de
voted to the handling of interstate
freight in connection with steam car
riers, and competes with steam trunk
lines in such manner, that in view of
the declared policy of the act we can
not hold it an 'interurban’ railway
within the exemption of the transpor
tation act of 1920.”
The decision of Justice Roberts de
tailed the history of the litigation from
the time it was first brought to the
southern courts, and consumed nine
typewritten pages of legal stationery.
Officials of the company said as
soon as they receive the petition of the
supreme court denying the right of
the electric line to build proposed ex
tensions without the permission of the
Interstate Commerce Commission,
that they will immediately begin con
ferences looking to the future policy
of the railroad in the attempt to build
new links that has already extended
over a period of years.
N. C. LEADS IN HOSIERY
Producing 33,000,000 dozens, N.
Carolina lead the nation in hosiery
production in 1929, the census shows.
Pennsylvania was second with 32,
000,000 dozens. However, the Penn
sylvania product was valued at $216,
000,000 and North Carolina’s only
$76,000,000.
Registration Books To
Be Open One More
Saturday, May 21
One more Saturday remains on
which voters whose names are not on
the county registration books can
register to vote in the primary, June
4, E. C. Gregory, chairman of the
election board, announced recently.
On Saturday, May 21, registrars will
be at their respective polling places
to register anyone eligible. On other
days, voters who have not registered
must go to the homes of the regis
trars in order to have their names en
rolled upon the registration books.
Saturday, May 28, is challenge day
and no registration will be accepted
that day.
Any voter who has lived in the
state one year and the precinct four
months is eligible to vote. In event he
has moved from one precinct to an
other within the last four months, he
must return to the voting place of
his former residence to cast his ballot.
If he has lived at his present home
more than four months, however, he
must have his name transferred to the
registration book of the precinct in
which he now resides.
No new registration has been order
ed, the chairman pointed out, and all
voters who voted in the 1928 election
or subsequent elections, including the
1930 election and municipal elections
since that time, are eligible to vote.
Heir to Billion
John D. Rockefeller, Third, grand
son of the oil magnate, as he appeared
in court where he served as juror in
a petty larceny case
Is Candidate For
Education Board
Mrs. T. E. Johnston, for many
years prominent in state educational
work, Thursday announced her candi
dacy for membership on the county
board of education.
Mrs. Johnston’s entrance followed
the announcement by Mrs. E. W.
Burt, present member of the county
board of education, that she would
not seek re-election.
Friends of Mrs. Johnston prevailed
on Mrs. Johnston to enter the race af
ter the withdrawal of Mrs. Burt, feel
ing that the board of education should
not consist solely of male members.
Mrs. Johnston’s candidacy, it is stated,
has been placed in the hands of friends.
Mrs. Johnston was formerly a mem
ber of the state department of educa
tion, the teacher training department
of the state and is now a member of
the state board of vocational training
and also a member of the Catawba
college faculty.
Mrs. Johnston is a daughter of Prof.
R. G. Kiser, for many years superin
tendent of the Rowan county schools.
DRINKS POISON AT PLAY
At play in the home, Saturday
morning, Marion Watford, 5, of Win
ston-Salem, drank from a bottle of
oil of wintergreen. She died later in
the day from its effects.
33 DEMOCRATS,
2 REPUBLICANS,
PAY HUNG FEES
Midnight Is Zero Hour
For Rowan County Can
didates To Enter Races.
JUNE PRIMARIES
TO BE WARMEST IN
COUNTY’S HISTORY
Expect G. O. P. Conven
tion To Officially File
Notices With Board Of
Elections Today.
Thirty-five candidates have filed
notice of their candidacy with E. C.
Gregory, chairman of the Rowan
county board of elections, for the va
rious county offices.
licans, all the candidates are demo
crats.
Following is a list of the candidates:
State Senate
Hayden Clement.
T. D. Brown.
E. W. G. Huffman.
State Legislature
J. W. Bean.
George Uzzell.
W. D. Graham.
J. W. Rideoutte.
Kent Umberger.
Sheriff
Cal L. Miller.
J. H. Krider.
James McKenzie.
Trial Justice
P. S. Carlton.
J. Allan Dunn.
Prosecuting Attorney
Charles Price.
W. V. Harris.
Auditor
J. E. Haynes.
S. A. Russell.
Register of Deeds
W. D. Kizziah.
W. H. Crowder.
County Commissioner
H. E. Isenhour.
R. L. Bernhardt.
O. L. Linn.
D. M. McLean.
Curtis A. Long.
T. M. Byrd.
C. M. Henderlite.
C. L. Neel.
J. T. Graham.
John E. Hoffman.
(Please turn to back page)
! ‘’Alice” is Now “Doctor of Letters” I
■__kI
teg. . Hi
9 Nicholas Murray Butler of Gohunbia University. Mrs. Uar&reaves is 80.
    

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