North Carolina Newspapers

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The Oldest Newspaper Published In North Carolina
The Carolina Watchman
"The Watchman Carries a Summary of <lAU The TSlgws”
Founded 1832-100th Year . SALISBURY, FRIDAY MORNING, JUNE 17, 1932 Vol. 27, No. 25 Price 2 Cents
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BOTH RENOMINATED
ON FIRST BALLOT
BY REP. CONFAB
President Hoover Receiv
ed 1126 Votes Out Of A
Possible 1156; Heads
Ticket Again.
LIQUOR PLANK
IS NEITHER
WET NOR DRY
Perfect Harmony Pre
vailed Throughout Con
vention; Only Contest
Arose On Prohibition
Question.
Herbert Hoover was renominated
Thursday for the presidency by the
republican national convention in
Chicago, on the first ballot, receiving
1126 out of 1H4.
also nom
Adjournment was momentarily ex
pected. /
The highlights of the convention,
which convened Tuesday, follow:
1. Senator L. J. Dickinson, Iowa,
temporary chairman, delivered key
note speech, ignoring prohibition,
praising Hoover’s leadership in the ec
onomic crisis and denouncing Demo
cratic "obstructionists”.
2. Dawes announces he would not
accept vice presidential nomination.
3. Bertrand H. Snell, who was made
permanent chairman of the conven
tion, addressed the convention and de
clared the solidarity of the republican
party was the salvation of the United
States.
4. Prohibition issue straddled, vot
ing for federal control with state’s
rights.
5. The republican platform was
read to the convention by James R.
Garfield, son of the late President Gar
field. Prohibition was the only con
tested plank.
The liquor plank is neither wet nor
dry and it can give comfort to both
of these factions depending on the
point of view.
Thus it provides:
First, for a referendum by consti
tutional methods of change so that
the people may decide. No dry could
really object to something constitu
tional to test public sentiment.
Second, it provides for a substitute
for the eighteenth amendment that
shall preserve the gams or prohibi
/ tion,” namely federal control. This, of
course, is satisfactory to the drys, but
not to the outright repealers, who
want all federal control through the
eighteenth amendment to be removed.
Third, it would give the states the
right to decide how each shall handle
the traffic in liquor. The wets like
this but the drys insist it must be a
nationally observed prohibition or it
will not be satisfactory to them. They
may recede later on this point but not
now.
Fourth, the plank declares for en
forcement of the existing law, which
is a sop to the drys.
ANSON MAN FATALLY SHOT
H. J. Sellers, widely known land
owner of Lilesville township, in An
son county, was fatally wounded while
plowing near his home "Wednesday af
ternoon. The shooting is veiled in un
certainty as to who fired the shot;
but a suspect connected with a fam
ily feud of 20 years ago when Sellers
accidentally shot a member of the
Cagle family is under suspicion. Sell
ers left the county and only returned
two or three years ago to repurchase
his homeplace.
Good
Morning
-*
ON PUBLISHING A
NEWSPAPER
If we print jokes, folk say we are
silly..
If we don’t, they say we are too se
rious.
If we publish original matter, they
say. we lack variety.
If we publish things from other pa
pers, we are too lazy to write.
If we don’t print contributions, we
don’t show appreciation.
If we do print them, the paper i:
full of junk.
Like as not some fellow will say w(
swiped this from another paper.
And we did.
THE "TWO FORS”
Sandy: "What did you think of that
two for a dollar cigar I gave you?”
Andy: "I thought you kept the 95
cent one.”
Diner—Is this beef or is it mutton,
waiter?
Waiter—Can’t you tell by the
WRONG UNWRITTEN WORK
Traffic Officer—Hey! what’s the
idea? Didn’t you hear me whistle to
you?
Pretty Girl Motorist—Certainly 1
Jid, and if you try it again I’ll report
you.
"So your friend became wealthy
through a sudden movement in oil.
What oil stock did he buy”?
"He didn’t buy any. A rich old
aunt tried to start a fire with a car
of it.”
WRONG FLAVOR
A Bishop had been speaking with
some feeling about the use of cosmet
ics by girls.
"The more experience I have of lip
stick,” he declared warmly, "th; more
distasteful I find it.”
STICKING TO IT
Wife-—"Mother says she nearly died
laughing over those stories you told
her.”
Hub—"Where is she? I’ll tell hei
some funnier ones”.—Boston Tran
script.
Most wives are like angels. They’re
always harping on something, always
up in the air, and never have any
thing to wear.
"Minnie, why do you, yell and
scream so? Play quietly like Tommy.
See, he doesn’t make a sound.”
"Of course he doesn’t. That is our
game. He is Papa coming home late,
and I am you.”
IT’S DIFFERENT IN THE MORN
ING
I
I love my bed. I know I do,
It is my firm conviction;
And yet, a^ times, my actions seem
To enter contradiction.
When I might speed me to my rest
I stall and dilly-dally
And find excuse to wait a while
To gab and shilly-shally.
II
I love my bed. I’m satisfied
With fondness I regard it.
Oh, not for anything would I
Be tempted to discard it.
And yet when I might properly
Accept its invitation
I hie me off and gab about ,
With little hesitation.
in
I love my bed. Of course, I do!
My love is deep, contented;
I dote upon its soft embrace;
I’m glad it was invented.
I seek it, true, reluctantly,
But that’s no sign of scorning—
You ought to see me heaving sighs
To leave it in the morning.
Plea of Children Saves Father
Charles R. Feagan took an automobile from St. Louis to Detroit and
was arrested by Federal officials on the charge of taking a stolen car across
a state line. Feagan says his friend asked him to sell the car for him. Any
way, other friends helped the three children to get to Washington, where
they saw President Hoover, who was touched by their plea and ordered
their father’s release.
All Candidates
All candidates in the June primary
are required by law to file a sworn
statement of all campaign exjpendi
tures and contributions within 20
days after the primary.
Candidates for county offices are
required by law to make their reports
to the clerk of Superior court, while
candidates for state offices must file
sworn statements with the secretary
of state.
It is pointed out that the statement
must show the name and address of
each person who has made a contri
bution to or for any candidate or for
his campaign committee within the
calendar year, together with the date
arid amount of such contribution. The
statement must also set out the name
and address of each person to whom
an expenditure has been made during
the calendar year in behalf of a can
didate or his campaign committee and
reported to the candidate or his cam
paign committee. The date and
amount of such expenditures must al
so be given.
Another section of the statute re
quires the campaign committee for
each candidate in the primary to file
a statement of contributions and ex
penditures not more than 20 days af
ter the Drimarv has been held.
Each statement must be verified by
the oath or affirmation of the person
making it before an officer authorized
to administer oaths. Failure to make
such report constitutes a misdemean
or, punishable by fine or imprison
ment, or both, in the discretion of the
court.
The law requires the clerk of Su
perior court to call upon the county
candidates and chairmen and treasur
ers of campaign committees to file
such itemized statements. Failure of
any candidate or campaign committee
to make such report shall be called to
the attention of the solicitor. It is pro
vided by law further that the secre
tary of state shall make demand for
similar statements as to state candi
dates, and the names of those failing
to comply are to be turned over to the
attorney-general.
BODY OF LYNCHED COLORED
MAN FOUND
Ironton, Ohio—The body of Luke
Marion, 3 5 years old, colored, of At
lanta, Ga., who was removed from
the South Point jail by a mob Tues
day night, was found in the Ohio riv
er. Four white men have been arrest
ed for questioning a and officers are
searching for twelve others suspected
of lynching the prisoner.
UNEMPLOYMENT DECREASES
Albemarle—Secretary James Tay
lor of the Albemarle Merchants’ asso
ciation, reports that the organization
has been responsible for the placing of
many people in employment, and that
the recent decision of the directors to
use the office as a means of bringing
the unemployed and those desiring to
have work of any character done to
gether is proving a success from every
standpoint. Local business men state
that Albemarle’s percentage of unem
ployed is less than that of any town
in the state with a like population.
Vets’ Bonus
Bil Passes
In The House
The banner of victory was hoisted
above the house of representatives by
the army of 20,000 war veterans bi
vouacked at the capitol to demand im
mediate payment of their bonus cer
tificates.
By a 209 to 176 vote, the house
agreed to the issuance of $2,400,000,
000 in new currency to meet the de
mands of the veterans who have con
verged on Washington from all sec
tions of the nation.
Jubilant over their temporary vic
tory, the former service men faced a
fierce struggle in the senate where
leaders predicted they had enough
votes to kill the legislation. President
Hoover has premised a veto if it
reaches the White House.
While veterans looked down from
packed galleries, the house amended
the bill by Representative Patman,
Democrat of Texas for full payment
to provide for an issue of government
bonds to be used for retiring the cur
rency if the dollar .became too cheap.
Proposals for taxing beer to raise
the funds were ruled out of order.
After the vote a few members and
some spectators joined in applause.
The veterans remained orderly and
most of them left immediately after
the roll call.
GASTON NEGRO TO DIE
Alex Grier has been sentenced to
the electric chair at Raleigh July 28.
He and Clyde Smith, both negi£>es,
were convicted of the murder of Har
old Carter, young filling station op
erator, at Gastonia. Smith was sen
tenced to 30 years imprisonment un
der verdict of second degree murder.
i .. 1
News Briefs
■■
$3,100*000 FOR FRANCHISE
High Poirft’s council is debating ac
ceptance of a $3,100,000 bid of the
Duke power interests for a 60-year
utility franchise there.
THIRD SET OF TWINS
South Londonberry, Vt.—Mrs. Har
ry Shattuck, 30, recently gave birth
to her third set of twin? a boy and a
girl, increasing her bra' J to 10 chil
dren.
KILLED ON HIGHWAY
Walking on highway 20 near Ruth
erfordton, Friday night, Joe Phillips,
28, was hit and fatally hurt by a car
driven by T. B. Poteat, 17, Spindale.
"UNLOADED” GUN FATAL
A shotgun, thought unloaded, went
off in the hands of J. D. Smith, of
near Whiteville, Saturday, and George
Smith, 6, was killed.
SIX DIE IN CRASH
An ambulance speeding to hospital
with a slightly injured child at Co!
lingswood, N. J., Tuesday, collided
16 DIE IN BATTLE
A large band of liquor thieves over
powered a detachment of guards at
Cuenca, Ecuador, Sunday and killed
all 10 of them. Six of the rum run
ners were also killed.
BOY KILLED BY CAR
Harold Thompson, 12, was fatally
hurt at Gastonia, Saturday, when he
rode his bicycle from a sideroad into
the path of the car of W. J. Richard
son, Belmont.
IS ROBBED BY THREE
Three men, suspected of being those
who slew a state’s prison camp stew
ard when they escaped last week, held
up L. E. Hollar at his filling station
near Hickory, Friday night and took
$115.00.
BRYAN’S DAUGHTER BEATEN
Mrs. Ruth Bryan Owen, daughter
of William J. Bryan, militant dry, was
beaten for Democratic congressional
nomination in the fourth, Miami, dis
trict of Florida, by Mark Wilcox, who
advocates repeal of the 18 th amend
ment.
YOUTH KILLED BY TRAIN
Engrossed in counting' hoboes on one
freight train near Kannapolis on Sun
day, Lloyd Pethel, 17, did not note
another freight approaching on the
other track. He was hit and killed.
SEVEN BANKS REOPENED
Of the 143 state banks which have
closed since 1927, seven have been
reopened and four have been com
pletely liquidated, the state banking
department reports. Eight banks clos
ed in 1927, five in 1928, 14 in 1929,
46 in 1930, 50 in 1931, and 20 so far
in 1932.
BOY STABBED AND TIED TO
RAILROAD TRACK
New Brunswick, N. J.—A 17-year
old boy was found tied to the Penn
sylvania Railroad tracks, unconscious
from shock and suffering from about
twenty slashes on his body. The head
light of an oncoming locomotive dis
closed the form on the tracks just be
fore dawn and the engineer brought
his train to a stop and released the boy.
SEACOAST IS INSPECTED
Cape Hatteras—Major Gordon R.
Young, district engineer of the war
department at Norfolk, Va., and Prof.
Thorndike Saville, chief engineer of the
North Carolina department of conser
vation and development, made an in
spection trip by seaplane of the coast
and inlets between Nag’s Head and
Cape Hatteras.
INCREASE NOTED
AT LOCAL OFFICE
FIRST FIVE MOS.
Local Postal Receipts
Have Increased $1,516.
01 So Far This Year.
NEW RATES GO
INTO EFFECT
ON JULY 6th
Moving of Stanback Med
icine Company From
Spencer T o Salisbury
Aids Local Office In
Showing Gain.
Postal receipts at the local post of
fice showed an increase of $1,516.01
up to May 31 of this year over the
corresponding period of last year, ac
cording to W. L. Ross, assistant post
master of the Salisbury postoffice.
Receipts up to May 31 of last year
totalled $28,272.78 while during the
same period of this year the local of
ta-the- «tte»t of
an increase
of $1,516.01.
TOM '111* e < f. g>.
w iuic ljlic uusmess iur tne iirst live
months of this year exceeds that of
last year, receipts for the month of
May of this year showed a decrease of
$591.53. Receipts for the two months
are as follows: May 1931, $5,706.91
and May 1932, $5,115.38.
Two industries in Salisbury are
largely responsible for the fine show
ing of the local postoffice. They are
the Character Products company, of
Salisbury, which started in business
here in 1930, and the Stanback Medi
cine company which moved to Salis
bury from Spencer. Both companies
do a large amount of direct mail ad
vertising. The latter company is a di
rect increase to the local office as all
its mailing was done through the Spen
cer postoffice before moving to the
city.
A schedule of the new postal rates,
which have been increased by an act
of Congress, has been received at the
local postoffice. These rates will go
into effect July 6th.
The increase means that the mini
mum rate for first class mail will be
three cents and that the charge will
be increased to three cents for each
ounce-*or fraction thereof above the
first ounce.
The new minimum rate of air mail
will be eight cents, with an additional
charge of 13 cents for each additional
ounce or fraction thereof. The air mail
rate is now five cents per ounce. The
postal card will be continued to be
sold at one cent as formerly.
n. new tnree cent stamp, printed in
purple ink and bearing a portrait of
George Washington is now being pre
pared to meet the expected demand.
The three-cent stamps which are in
use at the present time bear a portrait
of Abraham Lincoln.
Postage bills of firms with large
correspondence are scheduled to show
a big increase during the coming year.
The increase in rates is to continue for
only one year, but if at the end of that
yme the financial condition of the
country’s treasury has not improved
it is likely that the rate increase will
continue in force.
ROOSEVELT WILL GET N. C.
VOTES
Franklin D. Roosevelt will receive
North Carolina’s 26 vote* in the na
tional convention, under the action of
the state convention in session in Ral
eigh Thursday.
Walter Murphy, ofc Rowan, Tom
Wolf, of Stanly, J. L. Williams, of
Cabarrus, and John B. Robenette, of
Alexander, were named as delegates to
the convention with instructions to
cast the votes of the ninth district for
Roosevelt.
    

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