North Carolina Newspapers

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The Oldest Newspaper Published In North Carolina
The Carolina Watchman
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"The Watchman Carnes a Summary of oAll The TSlews”
Founded 1832-100th Year SALISBURY, FRIDAY MORNING, JULY 1 932 Vol. 27, No. 27 Price 2 C6nts
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Good
Morning
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OUT-OF-DATE ANIMALS
1— Street cars,
2— Bustles, #
3— Clean politics,
4— Unselfish politicians,
5— Passenger trains,
7— Protracted meetings,
6— Much underwear,
8— Good jobs (except government),
9— Good judgment.
10— And petticoats.
HOW TO FAIL
Be afraid.
Complain.
Exaggerate.
Be sarcastic.
Be a glutton.
Be conceited.
Scorn advice.
Procrastinate.
Be indifferent.
Praise no one.
Be a pessimist.
Repeat rumors.
Ridicule others.
Break promises. ,
Refuse to learn.
Travel the ruts.
Keep late hours.
Neglect your health.
Evade responsibility.
Be a chronic grouch.
Work without a plan.
Always have an excuse.
Do as little as possible.
Be a chronic borrower.
Think that you will fail.
Give your temper full play.
Spend more than you make.
Blame your errors on others.
—Selected.
TEN COMMANDMENTS FOR
AMERICAN PEOPLE
The following "Ten Command
ments for America,” from the fare
mreti «Ureu o£ George Washington,^
were compiled by Judge Edgar V.
Werner, Appleton, Wis., in connection
with the bi-centennial celebration this
year.
1. Cease, sons of America, lament
ing our separation; go on and confirm
by your wisdom the fruits of our joint
councils, joint efforts and common
dangers.
2. Reverence religion.
3. Diffuse knowledge throughout
your land.
4. Patronize the arts and sciences.
5. Let liberty and order be insepar
able companions.
6. Control party spirit, the bin of
free government.
7. Observe good faith to and culti
vate peace with all Nations.
8. Shut up every avenue of foreign
influence.
9. Contract, rather than extend na
tional connections; rely on yourselves.
10. Be an American in thought and
deed.
GOLDEN GLEAMS
The friends thou hast, and their adop
tion tried,
Grapple them to thy soul with hooks
and steel.—Shakespeare.
* * *
What you can do, or dream you can,
begin it; *
Boldness has genius, power asd magic
in it.—Goethe.
* * *
In the great war of Right and Wrong,
even I
My feeble help can give
To build a better world.—Brown.
WILL YOU SMILE?
If I were a sculptor who molded
A figure surpassingly fine,
If I were a painter who painted
A modern madonna divine,
If I were a poet who worshipped
My love with the lyrical line,
If I were a minstrel who chanted
Of love ’neath the heavenly blue
If I were those wonderful people,
And you were just plain little you,
I’d give you the gate in a moment
For, honest, you never would do!
—Brooklyn Eagle.
AIN’T EDUCATION GRAND!
According to a Boston University
student, "Socrates died of an overdose
of wedlock.”
Well, sometimes that is one of the
deadliest poisons love ever has to swal
low.
FOLLOW THE LEADER
"Oh, Mr. Policeman, a man has been
following me.”
"Are you sure he was following
you?”
"Yes, I went back two or three
times to see if he was coming.”
GOV. ROOSEVELT HOLDING LEAD
EXPECT 6,000
VOTES TO BE CAST
IN THE RUN-OFF
Race Between Cameron
Morrison And Reynolds
Is Exciting The Most In
terest In The County.
ALL DEMOCRATIC
MACHINERY A T
POLLS TOMORROW
Results Should Be Known
By Midnight Saturday
Owing To The Small
Number Of Names Of
Candidates.
With the second primary but 24
hours off, interest is at a high pitch
and many local people are predicting
victory for their favorite candidates in
no uncertain terms.
As the republican will not partici
pate in the second primary an all
democratic election machinery will- be
set up to supervise the voting. Two
democratic judges will serve at each
precinct along with the democratic
registrar.
The race for United States senator
between R. R. Reynolds and Cameron
Morrison has excited the most inter
est in the county. Backers of both can
didates are predicting certain victory;
however, just who will carry Rowan
county will not be known until
tomorrow night when the ballots are
counted.
Local leaders predict that approxi
mately 6,000 votes will be cast in the
primary Saturday.
Owing to the small number of can
didates appearing on the tickets the
second primary will be much easier to
handle than the first. All indications
are that the results will be known by
midnight tomorrow.
The official ballot follows:
STATE TICKET
United States Senator: R. R. Rey
nolds, Cameron Morrison.
Governor: J. C. B. Ehringhaus, R.
T. Fountain.
Commissioner of Labor: C. E.
Mitchell, A L. Fletcher.
COUN I I T1CRL1
For Legislature: J. W. Bean, George
Uzzell.
PENALTY TO GO IN EFFECT
Raleigh—Commissioner of Revenue
A. J. Maxwell is issuing a reminder to
all taxpayers liable for Schedule B li
cense taxes that a penalty of five per
cent will apply to all license taxes not
paid by July 1 and five per cent will
be added each month thereafter, until
paid. This penalty applies to the gen
eral merchants’ license taxes under
Section 164 of the 1931 Revenue Act,
as well as to othgr Schedule B license
taxes, under a ruling of Attorney Gen
eral D. G. Brummitt, Mr. Maxwell
points out.
HOTEL COMPANY CHARTERED
Raleigh—The following certificate
of incorporation has been filed in the
office of the secretary of state: At
lantic Beach Hotel company of More
head City, to own, operate and main
tain hotels, restaurants, boat houses,
beaches, etc.; authorized capital stock,
100 shared without nominal or par val
ue; subscribed stock, 10 shares, by
Robert W. Cordon, F. Vanden Fon
ville of Morehead City, and A. D.
MacLean of Washington.
WHAT PRICE FAME
Chicago—Maryland’s Governor Al
bert C. Ritchie is having his troubles.
He was jostled against a pillar, his
shoe came off and he sat down and put
it back on before all these people.
When a crowd gathered outside his
hotel, someone said it was Al Capone
and another said it was Hoover.
CAMERAGRAPHS
Reading Time : 3 minutes, 10 seconds
I TITLE BACK TO U. S.: The world's
heavyweight championship returned to
America when Jack Sharkey (right) won
the decision over Max Schmeling, Mad
ison Square Garden bowl.
RARE FORM: Pretty Jean Arthur* Paramount
teHtuMApItMr* displays her curves—among the
best in Hollywood. Like many other famous
actresses she saye "stay slender witl* salads'*
. . . eats two a day, with lots of mayonnaise,
instead of heavy, fattening foods.
INVENTIVE FAMILY: Ever hear of brothers who were inventors? T.M.
and J.D. Rector are. Still young, they are credited with many important
inventions. Tom (inset) is responsible for more than 30 inventions running
the gamut from gas masks to the new vita-fresh process that keeps coffee
roaster fresh. Mechanical gadgets are Jack’s specialty. Here he is with
one of his machines which in 10 minutes produces enough laundry starch
tablets to keep 4 family supplied for 60 years.
SAY GOOD-BYES: Jean Harlow, plat
inum blonde star, bids adieu to single
blessedness, weds Paul Bern . . . Sen.
Borah, Idaho, (right) bolts ranks of
Hoover supporters over prohibition plank.
REWARD: Amelia Earhart Put*
nam receives the American Flag
Association cross of honor in
recognition of her transatlantic
flight. Mrs. E. F. Hutton, New
York, makes the award.
WILL ROGERS plays no favorites.
He attended both national conven
tions—in the role of reporter.
Railroad Begins
Operation Of
Motor Express
In order to meet the competition of
motor transportation, the Seaboard Air
Line railroad has begun the operation
of a motor express line between Mon
roe and Hamlet.
Under a recent act of the Corpora
tion commission the railroad is allow
ed to cun a motor express in order to
compete with the motor transporta
tion companies in service and in price.
According to J. A. Dogulass, Seaboard
freight agent, this service is in the na
ture of an experiment.
The truck is allowed to pick up
freight only at the freight depots be
tween here and Hamlet. However, the
Seaboard is making a fight to secure
the rights to pick up and deliver
freight directly from and to the cus
tomer as do the ^ther transportation
companies.
The experimentai truck makes only
one trip daily but if business justifies
more trucks will be added and the
routes extended.
Joins “Big Family”
Miss Florence E. Watson,
Schenectady, N. Y., stenographer,
admits her engagement to Walter
Smith, youngest son of former
Governor Alfred E. Smith, whom
she met first two years ago.
Lead G.O.P. Campaign
Everett Sanders, Indiana, former
secretary to Calvin Coolidge, will
direct the Hoover-Curtis campaign.
He was elected Chairman, Repub
lican National Committee at
Chicago.
■ ■■■ I
News Briefs
* - —*
JOHNSON’S GRANDSON BURIED
Greenville, Tenn.—Andrew John
son Patterson, grandson of the 17th
president of the U. S., was buried here.
SUPPLY BILL PASSED
Washington—The $982,000,000 in
dependent offices appropriation bill
was passed by the senate and sent to
conference with the house.
BRYAN MEMORIAL
AUTHORIZED
Washington—President Hoover has
signed a congressional resolution for
the erection of a memorial to William
Jennings Bryan in the national capital.
STRIKE TIES UP RAILROAD
Mexico City—The Southern Pacific
railroad in Mexico was completely tied
up when 3,500 employes went on
strike after negotiations for a settle
ment had failed.
WET PLANK MEANS VOTES
New York—Dr. Nicholas Murray
Butler was quoted by Dr. John A.
Harriss as predicting a prohibition re
peal plank in the democratic platform
"will mean six million republican votes
for the democratic nominee.”
TWO DIE IN AUTO CRASH
Nashville, Tenn.—Blanche Morgan,
25, and Eileen Tanner, 25, both of
Nashville, were killed when the car in
which they were riding, crashed into
a telephone pole while rounding a
curve. The car caught fire after the
crash and the driver, unable to give
his name, crawled from the blazing
machine, seriously burned.
WETS JUBILA '
OVER THE REPEAL
PLANK ADOPTED
Roosevelt Forces Need
Over 10 0 Votes To
Clinch Nomination For
New York Governor.
DEMOCRATS TAKE
DEFINITE STAND
ON PROHIBITION
Advocate Repeal Of 18th
Amendment; N. Caro
lina Delegates Vote For
Resubmission.
Nomination of Gov. Franklin D.
Roosevelt, of New York, as the stand
ard-bearer of the Democratic party for
1932 was predicted as a certainty
Thursday night, according to reports
emanating out of the Democratic con
vention now in session in Chicago.
The nominee must have 770 votes
under the two-thirds rule. Roosevelt
lacked only 130 votes to secure the
nomination at a late Hovir last niglit.
Thursday "was spent in the adoption
of the platform, passing on the amend
ments, revisions or substitutions.
By an overwhelming majority, the
Democratic convention went on rec
ord favoring the repeal of the prohi
bition law. The vote was: for repeal
934 3-4; for submission 213 3-4.
North Carolina delegates voted 20
for resubmission and 6 for repeal.
The question was not or one or
"wet” or "dry.” The vote was record
ed on whether the plank should be for
resubmission or repeal. Those seeking
repeal swamped the convention.
Some of the highlights of the con
vention are as follows:
Keynote speech by Alben W. Bark
ley. Denounces Hoover administration.
Predicts Democratic victory in No
vember. Called for vote on dry-wet
issue.
Election of Thomas J. Walsh, Mon
tana, U. S. Senator, permanent chair
man, succeeding Jouette Shouse. This
was considered a victory for the
Roosevelt forces.
Adoption of tentative platform as
carried in detail elsewhere in this issue
of The Watchman.
Adoption of a plank advocating the
repeal of the 18 th amendment, follow
ing an address by Alfred E. Smith,
former nominee.
Roosevelt forces withdrew fight for
majority rule.
Candidacies of Roosevelt, Baker,
Ritchie, Garner, Byrd, White, Taylor,
and Smith urged.
Heated addresses pro and con on
prohibition issue.
T __:_I 1_TL. wn.A
i .a cv, ivvviT vu ts j « *»» "
man Thursday night indicate that the
names of Roosevelt, Garner and Al
Smith had been placed in nomination.
Al Smith wiy; placed in nomination
by Governor Ely, of Mass. The dem
onstration accorded Smith was the
longest on record at the convention,
lasting one hour and forty-six minutes.
BICYCLE SQUAD NOW
WALKING
Washington—Congress didn’t pro
vide funds for their maintenance, so
Washington’s bicycle police detach
ment has been discontinued. Of the
19 policemen so engaged, 18 are
pounding pavements again, one grad
uated to the motorcycle division.
G. O. P. MEETING ARRANGED
Newton—Saturday, July 16th, has
been fixed as the date for the Catawba
county republican nominating conven
tion, to select G. O. P. nominees for
local county offices. The democrats,
when meeting some time ago to select
local office nominees. Catawba coun
ty since 1930 has been under a demo
cratic administration.
    

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