North Carolina Newspapers

    The Oldest Newspaper Published In North Carolina
The Carolina Watchman
__ "The Watchman Carries a< Summary of ^All The TTgws”
IOUNDED 1832—100TH YEAR SALISBURY, FRIDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 21, 1932 VOL. 100 NO. 12 PRICE 2 CENTS
That New York Political Situation
.. ■■ i,^ ____
Political eyes of the nation are on New York state where Republicans and
Democrats are in a knock-down, drag-out fight which started months ago
and came to white heat in the Rooseveh-Al Smith-Jimmy Walker, investi
gations, split, etc., situations. Here are photos of the heavyweight candidates
in the state fight; Left, Col. Wm. J. (Wild Bill) Donovan, G.O.P candidate
for Govornor; Upper circle, Lewis H. Pound, G.O.P. candidate for mayor
of New York City; Lower circle. Judge John P. O'Brien. Tammy compro
mise candidate over Walker for mayor on Democratic ticket; Right, Lieut
Gov. Herbert H. Lehman, Democratic candidate to succeed Gov. Roosevelt
'“Outstanding in 1932~ !
The honor and title of being “The
outstanding woman in America for
1932” was awarded Amelia Earhart
Putnam, in civic ceremonies at Phil
adelphia. Her solo flight across the
Atlantic, the first woman, was the
feat which won for her.
NEWS
BRIEFS
HEADS AMERICAN BAR
Clarence E. Martin, of Martins
burg, W. V., was chosen president
of the American Bar association,
which held its 5 5 th annual meet
ing last week at Washington.
DEDICATES MEMORIAL
Thousands gathered at Rich
mond to witness the dedication of
Virginia’s memorial to her World
war heroes, a carillon housed in a
beautiful tower. ■ -
FOIL PRISON BREAK EFFORT
One convict was killed
hurt at Montgomery, Ala., when
16 tried to escape and around 500
prisoners took part in a general
uprising against authority.
NURSES NAME OFFICERS
The State Nurses association
have concluded at Raleigh a three
day convention. Miss Flettie
Reinhardt, Winston-Salem, was re
turned as president and head of
the officers. Winston-Salem won
the 193 3 convention.
PITTSBORO HAS FIRE
The Fields building, most mod
ern business structure in Pittsboro
was destroyed by fire of unknown
origin, with a theatre and four
mercantile firms on the first flqpr
and a number of private offices on
the second floor gutted by the
flames.
STABBED IN FIGHT
Paralyzed on his left side as re
sult of a knife stab in the spinal
column, Marlow McCraw, 14,
Burlington, is fighting, for his life.
Contane Ball, 15, is held for the
stabbing. He says McCraw and
others attacked him as he was es
corting a girl t«j her home.
GUILTY OF MURDER
George W. Courson was found
guiky, by a Jacksonville, Fla.,
jury of manslaughter of Arthur
Maillefert, young convict who
died in a prison camp with shack
les on his feet and a chain about
his neck. Courson and Solomon
Higginbotham, guards, were ac
cused of murder. Higginbctthfim
was freed by the Jury. Courson
noted an appeal.
DIES OF BASEBALL BLOW
Struck in the head by a baseball
in a game at Low Gap, Mont Is
aacs, 23, died at his home near El
kin, a week after he had received
the accidential blow.
CHILD BURNED TO DEATH
Effie Jackson, 2, of southwest
Lenoir county, burned to death
October 13 when her clothing
caught from an open fire.
LUTHERANS PROBE
PENSION, RELIEF FUND
The Lutheran biennial confer
ence at Philadelphia ordered an in
vestigation of investments in pen
sion and relief funds of the church.
It resulted from criticism of the
real estate and morteaee holdings.
All Voting Is
To Be Secret
November 8
Everyone To Receive Same Kind
Of Slips On Entering Booths
On Election Day
North Carolina voters on Nov
ember 8 will find themselves vot
ing _a„ Straight Australian bj.'iet i
the first time, IF was pointed out
yesterday at the office of the coun
ty board of elections.
All candidates for office will be
on the same ballot, and there will
be this fall no Republican tickets
as distinguished from Democratic
tickets, said Chairman E. C. Gre
gory of the election board.
In Rowan county there will be
only four ballots, and in each of
the 31 precincts identically the
same ballots will be cast. CJne bal
lot will contain the names of the
Democratic, Republican and So
cialist, presidential electors. The
second will be the state ballot,
which will contain Democratic
and Republican candidates for state
officers and for United States sen
ator and congress. The th:rd will
be the county ballot, listing all
Republican and Democratic candi
dates for county officers, including
township constables. The fourth
ballot will be for voting for or a
gainst the proposed constitutional
amendments.
Can vote Straight 1 ick.et
If a voter wishes to vote a
straight state ticket or county
ticket, he merely makes a cross
mark at the head of the column
of his respective party. If he wish
es to vote for Ehringhaus for gov
ernor, for example, and Jake New
ell for the senate, he does not make
a cross in either the Democratic
or Republican circles, but merely
makes a cross in the square op
posite each candidate he votes for.
In other words, he votes a mixed
ticket.
When the voter goes to the
polls, he is handed the ballot. He
goes into the booth and votes for
the candidates he prefers. There is
no way to prevent his ballot from
being secret, as would happen in
event each party had differenet
tickets, for everybody gets the
same sort of ballot. It is a secret
ballot in the full meaning of the
word and a pure Australian ballot.
Two Weeks To Register
Two Saturdays remain for reg
istration, said Chairman Gregory.
The registrars will be at the polls
from 9 o’clock to sunset each Sat
urday and at their homes on other
days.
STATE HOSPITAL HEAD DIES
Dr. Albright Anderson, 73, for
19 years head of the state hospital
for insane at Raleigh, died Sunday
morning of uremic poisoning.
76 Killed
By Autos
_In Sept.
Automobile accidents claimed
76 lives in North Carolina and in
jured 482 during September, the
motor vehicle bureau has reported.
The toll included seven children
who were run over while playing
in the streets. Drunken drivers
killed two people, while reckless
driving claimed 18 lives. Speeding
resulted in 12 deaths.
There were 315 motor accidents
reported in September. Male driv
ers were at the wheel of 423 auto
mobiles involved, while women
were driving only 44.
Forty-five motorists figuring in
accidents were intoxicated at the
time.
A total of 1,005 persons were
killed in automobile accidents in
North and South Carolina in 1931,
while 6,165 ^others were injured.
The first nine months of this
year, in the two Carolinas, 644
persons were killed and 4,324
hurt.
Although only 20 days have
passed this month, records reveal
26 have been killed in the state
during that period.
FATAL EXPLOSION
Pouring kerosene on live embers
to kindle a fire, was a fatal mis
take for Mrs." W. L. Harrison,
wife of a Caledonia prison farm
guard, October 13. An explosion
ignited her clothing and she was
burned to death.
Jake F. Newell
Speaks Tonight
At Courthouse
Jake F. Newell, Charlotte at
torney and Republican nominee
for the United States Senate, will
deliver an address in the Rowan
county courthouse tonight at 8
o’clock.
Preceding the address, there
will be a torch light parade down
Main Street. The parade will form
on Main Street at the Kress build
ing and proceed down Main Street
to the courthouse.
Mr. Newell, dry leader in this
state, is expected to discuss this
issue at length, as well as the
leading issues confronting the
people in this campaign.
RUM DEALERS DRAW
STIFF PRISON TERMS
Federal Judge Hayes Hears
Many Liquor Cases-Several
Probations Are Revoked
- —--- l - ' "
GOOD
MORNING
WORD COMES FROM PARIS
that skirts will be "even longer.”
Which goes to show how silly it
was to mistake style for common
sense in the first place.
—
STRAW VOTES AS IT WERE
show which of the candidates is
making hay.
THE TROUBLE WITH THE
Government is it can’t seem to get
on its feet without getting on ours.
_
ORATORY IS THE WIND
that blows the chaff.
HUNGER IS NOT APPEAS
ed a whole lot by the things poli
ticians would have us swallow.
- -
IN TTMES-UIKE THESE many
a lover finds the engagement dia
mond a stumbling stone.
"Why so blue, Rastus?”
"Ah lost mah chickens.”
"Don’t worry, chickens go home
to roost.”
"Dat’s de trouble, boss, they
went!”
Blanche: Didn’t you and Harry
take a walk alonjj toward the end
of the dancing party?
Pauline: Yes, we simply had to
stretch our legs a bit.
"She fainted and was resuscitat
ed.”
"Another good woman gone
wrong.”
George: Say, there ought to be a
cooling system in Mary’s house.
Pat: There is. Her old man sits
downstairs whenever I call.
Voice from Upstairs: Jane, tell
that young man to turn those
lights on.
Jane: But, Father, we haven’t
turned the lights off.
V. F. U.: Oh! All right. I
thought I heard the light button
snap.
Jane: No, Father, that wasn’t
the light button.
"How far are you going?” said
the coy young thing as the car
jerked to a standstill on the lonely
road.
First Model: I said some very
foolish words to my boy-friend last
night.
Second Model: Yes?
First Model: That was one of
them.
He: I’ll bet there’s one dance you
won’t sit out. . . .
She: Which is that?
He: The St. Vitus Dance.
"Your son has very fine man
ners. He opened the gate for me.”
"Oh, that’s nothing. He does
that for the cows every evening.”
"Say, Tom, what’s that piping
around your girl’s waist for?”
"That’s a water cooler.
The curse of drink is paying for
k.
"My, how you must love that
girl.”
"Gee, does she look that bad?”
; Helen Jacobs* New Role
Helen Jacobs, women’s national
tennis champion, has quit California
and year-around tennis and from her
headquarters in the Panhellenic Hotel
for girls in New York, joins the lit
erary ranks. Miss Jacobs is writing
a book on tennis for beginners. She
has no fear of going stale physically.
"Plenty of walking, squash, indoor
tennis and sleep will keep me fit,”
says Miss Jacobs.
rake Money
Gang Sent
To The Pen
Cases against several counter
feiters arrested a few months ago
in a roundup in this state were dis
posed of in federal court here.
Judge J. J. Hayes sentenced J.
D. Kelly to three years in Atlanta
penitentiary in each of four cases
and fined him $ 1 in each case.
Frank Webb'was fined $180 and
placed on three years probation in
one case, in another judgment was
suspended.
Eugene Click was sentenced to
Atlanta to two years and fined $1
in each of three cases, the terms
to run concurrently.
Joe West was fined $180 and
put on probation for three years.
DeWitt Bost was sentenced to
Chillicothe reformatory for two
years and fined $ 1 in one case, but
judgment was suspended in anoth
er.
Raymond Herrin was sentenced
to 18 months at Chillicothe in one
case and a year and a day m anoth
er, the terms to run concurrently.
In a third case he was sentenced to
a year and a day at Chillicothe,
the terms to begin at the expira
tion of the first.
ROCKINGHAM STRIKE ENDS
Gaining none of their demands,
1,200 textile strikers at Rocking
ham voted by big majority to re
turn to work in the Pickett and
Entwistle ir^lils. TT^e 'company
stores reopened Monday and Wed
nesday was set as date of mill op
eration. The workers had been
idle eight weeks. •
GORDON MANAGES
HOME BANK
Hugh H. Gordon, Miami, Fla.,
has arrived in Winston-Salem to
become manager of the fourth
district home loan bank which
opened for business.
Number Of Offenders
Sent To Atlanta While
Others Given Time
In County Jails
Violators of the national prohi
bition laws fared hard in federal
court here this week. Judge John
son J. Hayes, presiding over the
October term, meted out a number
of sentences to the penitentiary
and to various county jails.
In several instances, probations
given at former terms were revok
ed,
A large number of booze sales
men pleaded guilty to the charges
preferred against them.
A summary of the leading cases
follows:
Earl Smith and Olin Smith, pos
session and transporting iiquor,
plead guilty; 18 months each in
C.hillicothe reformatory.
Mary Strockton and Febe Grif
fin, possession and transporting of
liquor; Griffin plead guilty, 18
months in Atlanta prison: verdict
of not guilty as to Mary Strock
ton, by order of the court.
Henry Marks, violation of nat
ional prohibition act; jury verdict
of guilty, 18 months in Atlanta
I and $200.
Leo Franklin Fry and Glenn
Lester Beauchamp, violation of
national motor vehicle act. Fry
plead guilty, 14 months in Chilli
cothe reformatory; nol pros as to
Beauchmanp.
Roy McKinney, violation of na
tional motor vehicle theft act,
plead guilty; two years in Chilli
cothe reformatory.
Joe Lentz, Stanly county, viola
tion of national prohibition act,
plead guilty; $150.
Charles Dees and Eddie Spivey,
possession and transporting of
liquor, plead guilty; both on pro
bation three years.
Earl Burroughs, manufacturing
and possession of liquor, plead
guilty; six months in Montgomery
county jail.
Charley Talbert and Jesse
Thomason, possession and* trans
porting of liquor, plead guilty; on
probation until the April term of
court.
J. Robert Melton and J. Pres
ton Crisco, manufacturing and
possession of liquor and conspiracy,
plead guilty to manufacturing and
possession; probation until April
term.
A. L. Hinson and J. J. Hatley,
manufacturing and possession of
liquor; six months each in Cabar
rus county jail.
Floyd Ledbetter, Cabarrus coun
ty, violation of national prohibi
tion act; capias for non-payment
of fine is extended, defendant in
state prison for a term of ten
years.
George Floyd, Davidson county
possession and sale of liquor; plead
guilty; six months in jail and
$200.
John Hunt, Davidson county,
possession and sale of liquor; plead
guilty; probation two years.
Ernest Snyder, Davidson coun
ty, possession and sale of liquor;
plead guilty; on probation three
years.
Dave Leonard, Davidson coun
ty, violation national prohibition
act; plead guilty; $100 and placed
(Please turn to page two)
" Oh Yeah," said Bert 1
Bert Lievsay, Hollywood butcher,
had been songht for fir* years by
attorneys who wished to tell him ine
speculation in four sections of New
Mexico land, years ago,—is now the
home of many oil wells and wealth
for him.
Bailey Blaines
G.O.P. Leaders
For Depression
Indicting the Republican party
for policies that have isolated the
United States, piling up taxes un
til they are unbearable and foist
ing upon the country a banking
system that could not endure, Sen
ator Bailey in a speech to a large
audience here Wednesday night
pledged the Democratic party to a
readjustment of taxes, a world
wide po'icy that will put us on
friendly terms with other nations
and a relief program for the far
mers that will really relieve.
Senator Bailey very forcifully
outlined some of the proposed
measures for bringing' back pros
perity. Federal taxes will be cut
to the bone, with the Democrats
promising at least a 25 per cent re
duction, he statejl. Further, the
agricultural difficulty will be ad
justed so that the farmer will be
protected and make a fair profit on
his farm products, thereby pro
viding a market for industry. The
banks will be safe deposits for the
depositors, Mr. Bailey said, and
the Democratic program proposes
to seek a new system whereby a
person may not be able to borrow
money for gambling or speculation.
Another of the Democratic
measures is to pursue an interna
tional policy for peace, and read
justments of tariif laws so that all
trades of all nations will be aided.
Ross M. Sigmon, chairman of
the county executive committee,
opened the meeting, afterward
turning it over to Lee O. Gregory,
chairman of the Rowan Roosevelt
Garner club, sponsors of the meet
ing. Charles L. Coggin,. local at
torney, introduced Mr. Bailey, and
spoke of his honesty, faithfulness
and loyalty to the interests of the
common people.
During Mr. Bailey’s address, he
paid a beautiful tribute to the late
Senator Lee S. Overman, of this
city, and his closing words attri
buted to Franklir\ D. Roosevelt,
whom Mr. Bailey predicted would
be elected by a large majority.
    

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