North Carolina Newspapers

    THE ERA.
Official Orpin of the Vnlted States
Official Organ of the Cltr.
W. M. 11KOWX, Manager.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER I, 1874.
A Call for a Convention of the
Republicans of the Recon
structed States.
For the purpose of taking Into
consideration the condition of af
fairs in the reconstructed States, and
to issue an address to the people of
the nation, containing a true state
ment of the fiame. HeDublicans of
these Stated are rnauested to send
delegates to a convention to be held
anaiianooga, nn., uciu
Each of said Slates may send as
many delegates as shall be deemed
advisable, and such delegation will
be entitled to the number of votes
to which their States respectively
are entitled in the electoral college,
All Republicans, whether of these
or other States, who still earnestly
seek to maintain the principles on
which the Union was defended, and
to inaugurate Which in the South
reconstruction was begun, and who
feel an interest in the preservation
fflInWto'Mfhb
consultation. All should come pos- the disastrous aeieac mat awaus
sessed of the facts as to the true con- him at the hands of the great Re
dltion in their respective localitities publican party in Missouri ; a defeat
so that an authoritative statement
may be made to the country.
The Republicans of the South,
equally with the good citizens of
other localities, demand peace and
security that prosperity may fol
low. Why these are not enjoyed by
them should be made manifest by
this Convention. The best men
and minds of each State should be
summoned to this council. If there
are those anywhere who doubt as
to the purposes or capacity of South
ern Republicans, or who believe the
oppresslons under which they are
muuriug uuvo wxu uiagmneu, lei
them come and see and hear for
themselves.
POWELL CLAYTON,
U. S. Senator, Arkansas.
CHARLES HAYES,
M. C, 1th District, Ala.
JAMES T. RAPIER,
M. C, 2d District, Ala.
C. C. SHEATS,
M. C, At Large, Ala.
GEO. E. SPENCER,
U. S. Senator, Ala.
BOULDS BAKER.
Texas.
A. WARREN,
Chairman Rep. 8. Cora., Miss.
O. U. SCliOFIELl),
Chairman R. S. Cora., W. Va.
N. S. MOORE,
Kentucky.
G. W. GIST,
Kentucky.
II. P. FARROW,
Chairman Rep. S. Com., Ga.
S. W. DORSEY,
U. S. Senator, Ark.
W. II. H. STOWELL,
M. C, 4th District, Va.
J. J. MARTIN,
Alabama.
SAMUEL F. MADDOX,
State Senator, Virginia.
S. B. PACKARD,
Chairman Rep. S. Com., La.
J. R. WEST,
U. S. Senator, La.
Carl Schurz and tho Colored
Vote.
This gentleman made a speech in I
Missouri a few days ago, in which
he well sustained the reputation we
have for some time accorded him as
one of tho most accomplished dem
agogues of the country. Mr. Schurz
is reported as saying in substance,
that tho establishment of mixed
schools would not be of benefit to
the colored race in tho South, but
that on the contrary such a system
would work to their serious injury ;
and that the ill effects of the plan as
proposed in the civil rights bill
would be mainly felt by the poorer
class of the whites who were unable
to educate their children at private
institutions of learning. Now, we
do not pretend to question the cor
rectness of the Senator's position in
this particular respect. Indeed, we
rather agree with him that tho es
tablishment of mixed schools would
not work beneficial results to our
colored friends in the South. We
can go further and say, that we do
not believe any large portion of our
colored fellow-citizens ever desired
or expected the incorporation of any
such feature, but would rather have
preferred that their offspring should
receive instruction in schools com
posed of teachers and children of
their own color and class. It is
natural that persons of all classes
should hold social familiar inter
course with those only of similar
tastes and views with themselves,
and the colored people form no ex
ception to this rule. If there are
some who desire any such affilia
tions as mixed schools (and we do
not doubt it), they were instigated
In the first instance by Carl Schurz
and his followers, wTho hoped by
placing the father of the proposed
measure, Horace Greeley, before the
people in 1872 to win over a suffi
cient number of the colored voters
to give him the electoral votes of the
Southern States and elect him Pres
ident. It is not to bo denied that Carl
Schurz and his followers were well
posted as to Mr. Greeley's views
upon the mixed school question at
.the time his name was placed before
the people for the Presidency. For
many years before, he had, through
the columns of the Tribune and in
: various speeches, promulgated his
t peculiar ideas to the people of the
' country on the relations between
'tho' two races. These ideas were
couched in no doubtful language,
and it Is well known that in Mr.
Greeley's letterof acceptance he not
only did not retract any of his for-
mer notions, but even reiterated his
continued devotion to tho idiosyn-
crasies that attached to his past life;
yet, Carl Schurz, actuated by greed
for office and hatred to General
Grant, urged the election of the man
who entertained views radically
LxlifTerent from those which he now
admits are detrimental to the Inter
ests of the colored man and calcu
lated to impair the good feeling sub
sisting between them and the whites.
How can Mr. Schurz, In the face of
the . position he assumed In 1872,
now expect the people of Missouri
or any other section to receive the
speech lately made in any
other
I light than a catchpenny attempt of
I a disappointed deraao-ue to again
create discontent and discord In the
Republican ranks. The people of
Missouri have already been suffl-
ripntlv flp,Ufleti bv thi elfish nolit-
ciently deiuciea oy tmssemsn pont-
ical adventurer, we hope, to ever
again follow him in his puny efforts
to wreak his vengeance u Don Gen-
eral Grant. Like others who have
tried the same game, Schurz will
find that Grant's refusal to him of
the Spanish Mission is only a small
P0 P-sent compared to
which will, we trust, consiam him
win, o "
I and his turbulent political followers
to ignominious retirement, never
again to disturb the country by their
tricks and combinations.
But there is another point in the
crafty Senator's speech which clearly
exhibits his disposition to take ad
vantage of the disorder now exist
ing in the South to scare the colored
voters into the support of his mon-
rrTCi nartv. He tells them in sub-
stance that if they will only divide
and cast some of their votes for the
Democratic party, that they will
doubtless be treated with more con
sideration ; that the wholesale mur
ders and whippings every day in
flicted upon them are only because
they choose to vote solidly for the
measures and party of their choice.
We did not expect Schurz to make
this admission ; but it i3 true. If
the colored men of the South will
only cast a sufficient number of
votes for the Democratic party, to
insure its success, we do not doubt
that they would be willing to allow
them at least a little peace. It is,
after all, only the loaves and fishes,
they are struggling for, and theyare
willing to stoop to any degree of
sycophancy to accomplish their pur
pose. We are happy in the belief,
however, that the colored people of
the South know their rights too
well to be willing to barter them
merely for tho poor privilege of be
ing exempt from persecution and
outrage. They know that the same
benignGovernment which bestowed
is willing ana ready to
enforce their rights to a free ballot,
and they are not to be intimidated
by
threats from either Ku Klux
Democrats or so-called Liberal Re
publicans.
The difference.
Since the days of General Jack
son there has not existed in this
country such a party in the true
meaning of the term as a National
Democratic Party. From the time
that the old hero placed his admin
istration on high national grounds
by the issue of his celebrated proc
lamation against nullification, the
Democratic party has been made
up of factions in every section of
the Union, differing widely in prin
ciple and hanging together only
with a view to the distribution of
the spoils of office. To use the lan
guage of one of its former promi
nent members, it was kept together
by 4t the cohesive power of public
plunder." The platforms of the
party are so shaped as to be capable
of one construction North and an
other South. In the North the
members of the party, althoucrh
they take issue with Republicans on
- -i
many questions, still, in order to ob
tain power, profess the most ardent
love for the Union. In the South,
in order to keep pace with public
sentiment, they adopt planks in all
of their platforms expressive, either
directly or indirectly,of their attach
ment to the lost cause. The lead
ers in the North during the exist
ence of a Presidential campaign,
in order to catch the electoral votes
of the Southern States, lustily pro
claim themselves Northern men
with Southern principles." Thus,
by platforms and resolves they hope
to unite the various sections with
the view to national success.
The Republican party, on the oth
er hand, is purely national in all its
tendencies. Its platforms are wide
enough and plain enough to be com
prehended and accepted by patriots
of all sections. It offers nothing to
the freemen of the North which it
is unwilling to extend to those of
the South. All of Its measures tend
to the good of the country at large,
and no act calculated to work par
ticular injury to any section is ever
wilfully perpetrated. In short, the
Republican party is the only one
now known to American politics
under whose banner the people of
all classes can rally with any degree
of hope for the prosperity and con
tinued welfare of the entire Nation.
. Mount Etna still
state of eruption.
continues in a
An old friend in western ISorth
Carolina writes under date Septem-
ber 15th, as follows:
'It is hardly worth while to write
upon the lato election: the result
was foreseen and felt before it carae
at least by me. But like all panics,
11 i xi si ti. m- f 1 1
inis cause i uy uio civil nguia uui(
will have its day and then die. ; I
have hopes and shall encourage the
nope inai noiwunsianaing lis pern,
the great Republican , partyjnay
withstand the deadly assaults of the
enemies of law, order, justice Jind
humanity, to-wit, the rebel Democ
racy, aided by deluded Conserva
tives, so-called.
The last Congress refused to give
widows of the soldiers of the war of
1812 .pensions becausethey.hap
penea to marryone dayafter peace
was ratified. What strange justice
laws sometimes enact U. And again :
the Southern Claims Commission
were very illiberal in their decisions
in property claims.1 All these things
combined have had a very depress
ing effect upon the faithful friends
of the Union in the South'
We call attention to the commu
nication of 44 Caldwell"- in this is
sue. It is reported that much in
dignation exists among the people
of both parties in Caldwell county
on account of the late legal decis-
ion requiring the OommMoro, of
the county to issue bonds in aid of
the Chester and Lenoir Railroad.
The corporation is said to be under
Democratic control, and at the elec-
CUJWiaiIt wiuf
tion submitting the proposition of
county aid, a majority of the reg
istered voters failed to vote. This
failure of the people to take any
part in the question was the result
of the belief, that it was necessary
to obtain a majority of those regis
tered as voters, to make the decis-
ion a legal
one.
Tribute of Respect.
Caldwell, Lodge, No. 180,
August 1G, A. D. 1874, A. L. 5874.
WiiEitEAS. It hath pleased the
Supreme Grand Master of the Uni
verse, in his infinite wisdom and
love, to call from labor to eternal
refreshment on the loth day of Au-
gust, 1874,our beloved brother, John
White, a Past Master of this Lode;
therefore,
Resolved, 1. That while we bow
in meek submission to Him who is
the only true source of light and
joy, yet we do realize in the death
of Bro. White, the sad fact that this
Lodge has lost one of not only its
oldest but most active and useful
members, and the fraternity one of
its purest, best and most beloved
sons. But few if any of us were
better skilled than he in the use of
the beautiful implements of our or
der, or employed them more faith
fully in labors of benevolence and
feelings of charity to all, and in
erecting that spiritual temple, that
" house not made with hands eter
nal in the heavens."
2. That we will be moved by this
sad visitation to a more serious and
profitable reflection upon our lives,
and an earnest preparation for our
fast approaching: and also certain
summons, so that by an emulation
of his virtues we may finally share
his reward.
3. That we do tender to his strick-
en family the assurance of our heart-
felt sympathy and fraternal condol-
ence in this their deep bereavement.
4. That in token of our esteem
and grief we will wear the usual
badge of mourning for thirty days.
5. That these resolutions be en
tered upon the minutes, and a copy
be furnished to the family of the
deceased, and copies be forwarded
to the Raleigh Era and Tobacco
Plant. II. B. GUTHRIE,
D. McCAULEY,
M. R. SUGG,
JAMES B. MASON,
Committee.
What Came ol" a Tom Boy.
Miss Martha Knight is a good
looking girl who was born in Bos
ton, and very early in life mortified
her parents and friends by being
that childish feminine monstrosity
called a "Tom Boy." She cared
nothing for dolls and miniature
housekeeping, like other little girls,
but wanted gimlets and augers, and
saws and hatchets, and nails and
lumber to work with. Instead of
learning to sew on doll's clothes,she
mado sleds and wasrons and kites
for her numbskull brothers, and she
nnaily became a wonder of mechan
ical genius. Her taste ran that way,
ana ner menus concluded to let it
TO when thev found thev could not
ston it. Miss Martha Kniffht.beins?
poor, went into a paper bag manu-
o o
factory to earn her livelihood. Of
course such a girl could not stay at
home and drone away her life at
the family fireside. She went to
work like a man, and has now be
come famous and the pride of the
old folks. She has won the distinc
tion of being the first female inven
tor that ever received a intent for a
complete invention at Washington.
Her invention is a machine for
making paper bags. Several at
tempts had previously been made
in tins direction by men of mechan
ical genius, and all had failed. This
"Tomboy" has now done it. and
made a success. Unaided she drew
her plans, and she superintended
the putting up of the machinery at
Amnersr, juass. it works well, and
her everlasting fortune' is made.
F
O R
E.
A House and Liot in the Eastern
TFard, containing four rooms and
kitchen, with one-fourth acre of ground
attached, on Newbern Avenue, will be
sold on reasonable terms. Any person
desiring to purchase will apply at th;s
office, mar 4 3t.
sm mm mm as
MUD
febl6-w2m. -
c
QItN'tlIEtALI II A Yt
One carload corn i One carload bolted
meal; two carloads timothy hay; 100
bushels Virginia oats, - and 75 bbls.
Itockland lim, at. ' ; : -. i i i i.
i MUHKAY fc ALLEN'S .
32 3t Feed Store, N. C Depot.
i
HEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
Atf T11ADE, 18T4.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
J xa ; '
J-t M.,- V ROSENB AUM
-lS9t
Corner FayetteviUe and Hartjctl Streets,
i I arrr now receiving my FALT tend
wirTER.stQCk or . i i
' - General " Merchandise, "
. , . 1 t ' ' "' .
recently purchased in person at North
ern Manufactories, and being from first
hands, I am prepared to offer advanta
ges to the Trade seldom offered in the
city of Raleigh.
My stock of. .
Ready-made Clothing'
is full and complete, bought principally
at auction sales from first-class houses.
I think I can offer inducements, both
to the wholesale and retail trade, that
can not be surpassed south of the New
xorK market.
STAPLE DRY GOODS
of every, grade and style, and marked
at prices that will sell them.
BOOTS, SHOES, HATS fc CAPS
in every variety, embracing every style,
quality and novelty of fashion.
The China, Crockery and Glass
Ware Department
is a specialty of my trade, and I can
furnish goods in this line to my whole
sale trade at factory prices. Call early
to secure bargains. Especial attention
paid to the retail department.
Attentive and experienced salesmen
in every department, and I can assure
the ladies it is not a trouble, but a pleas
ure, to show goods.
J. M, HOSKNBAUM.
Kaleigh, Oct. 1, 1874. 15
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE UNI
TED STATES, EASTERN DIS
TKICT OF NORTH CAROLINA.
United States vs. 9 boxes manufactured
tobacco, 900 lbs leaf tobacco, 2 hand
screw presses, 1 pair scales, 75 pounds
of twist tobacco, 300 pounds of stems,
24 dryers, property of Thomas H.
Debnam. Libel of information.
To Thomas H. Debnam, and to all
whom it may concern : Greeting.
Notice is hereby given, That the above
mentioned property was seized by Mi-
ual Revenue,lst District North Carolina,
on the 1st of July, 1874, as forfeited to the
uses of the United States, for violation
of the Internal Revenue Laws, and the
same is libelled and prosecuted in the
Circuit Court of the United . States for
condemnation for the causes in tha said
Libel of Information set forth ; and that
the said causes will stand for trial at
the Court Room of said Courtat Raleigh,
on the last Monday of November next,
if that be a jurisdiction day, and if not
at the next day of jurisdiction thereaf
ter, when and where all persons are
warned to appear to show cause why
condemnation should not be decreed,
and to intervene for their interest.
Given under my hand at office, in Ra
leigh, this 23d of Sept., 1874.
J. B. HILL,
United States Marshal, .
Eastern District N. C.
Sept. 25, 1874. 15 4t
Statement of the Mercantile Mutual
Insurance Company, located xn the
City of Nexo York, furnished the
Secretary of State of North Caro
lina. CAPITAL STOCK.
Amount of the capital stock, $500,000 00
Amount paid up in cash,
500,000 00
ASSETS.
Cash on hand and deposited
in Banks to the credit of
the Company,
Stocks, market value,
Interest actually due and un
collected, Premium notes on hund upon
which policies have been
issued,
Due in cash by agents, uncol
lected premiums, salvages,
etc.,
44,118 01
2G5.892 00
5,957 29
310,65 78
375,794 07
Total assets, $1,002,387 15
LIABILITIES.
Losses due and yet unpaid, $8,997 00
Claims for losses resisted by
the Company,
Losses not yet due, including
those reported to Company
on which no action has yet
been taken,
Dividends declared, and due,
9,000 00
44,008 00
and remaining unpaid, 14,404 93
All other claims against the
Company,
Amount required to safely
re-insure all outstanding
risks,
4 QS4 fi7 I
246,940 93
Total liabilities, $328,394 93
INCOME.
Cash premiums received and
notes received for premi
ums, 1,483,725 47
Interest money received, 22,336 07
$1,506,061 54
EXPENDITURES.
Losses paid; 1,027,374 57
Dividends paid, 15,015 00
Expenses paid, including
fees and commissions to
agents and officers of the
Company, 201,139 90
Taxes paid, 30,051 01
All other payments and ex
penditures, 29,615 33
Total expenditures, 1,303,195 81
A. MONTGOMERY, Jr., Pres.
C. J. Despard, Sec'y.
Statement of the Farmville Insurance
and Ranking Company, of Farm
ville, Va.-, made to the Secretary of
State of North Carolina.
Cash Capital, $120,000 00
Cash assets 1st May, 1874, $134,818 38
Bills receivable, . $74,000 00
Mortgages 1st liens on
real estate, 20,000 00
United States bonds, 15,000 00
Bank stock and railroad -
bonds, 7,043 00
Cash in Bank, 13,317 08
uasn in nanus of agents, 5,125 30
Property, (furniture,) 333 00
Total, $134,818 38
LIABILITIES.
Capital stock. $120,000 00
-Losses unad-
justed,
2,500 00
Reserve fund,
(at oO cents,)
7,116 00129.616 00
Surplus,
$5,202 38
W. I. RICE. Prea'L
J. II. Mottley, Sec'y
O V EJ O Y A C A D IS HI Y.'
The Sixty-sixth
Session will begin
August 5tu, 1874.
J. M. IiOVEJOY.
J. M, WHITE.
56 4t
MISCEULANEOUS.
A
CRAXD GIFX COJiCEBT
Will be given In the city of Greensboro, N.C?
DECEMBER 31st, 1874,
foT e patpose oferecting an
0DDv FELLOWS' TEM PLE.
t The Grand Gt ia the t
- . ! J - ' i
BEBOW HOUSE,
Worth. 00,000.00.
GRAND CASH GIFT
$10,000.00.
Heal Xlstate Gifts, -
S1,300
SS500
Cash Gifts, -
Only 100,000 tickets to be issued. ,
PRICE OF TICKETS $2.50.
Agents Wanted.
gFor further particulars, address
the Manager, Box 8, Greensboro, N. C.
C.iVMEiroENIIAULf.;
.,,. , Manager
Sept. i0-8w
W1
Jj Tj I A M SIMPSON
PHARMACIST & DRUGGIST,
33 Fayetteville St.,
RALEIGH, N". C.
Keeps constantly on hand a full and
complete stock of
DRUGS,
CHEMICALS,
IMPORTED PERFUMERY
HAIR BRUSHES,
COMBS,
TOILET ARTICLES
Of every description usually kept in a
first-class Drug Store.
A large stock of
Fresh and Reliable Garden Seeds
iust to hand.
I would call the attention of those in
need to my stock of
HARD RUBBER TRUSSES
which far surpass any other in use
They are light,cleanly and comfortable ;
never rust, break, chafe or soil. They
may be had on trial for 30 days if not
satisfactory they may be returned, when
the money will be refunded.
mho-3m.
CAROLINA COTTON GIN,
McCALLUM, WYCKOFF AND
HOPE, Successors to
SEPABK, HICKS & CO.,
ENGINEERS, IRON FOUNDERS
AND
MACHINISTS,
RALEIGH, N. p.
Wo are now manufacturing the Caro
lina Gin, awarded a gold medal by the
North Carolina Agricultural Society in
1873, for the best Gin made in the State.
It has no superior, is the lightest run
ning, strongest and most durable Gin
made. We guarantee every Gin to give
entire satisfaction. The prices are lower
than any first class Gin sold in the State.
We also manufacture the best steam En
gines and Boilers in the market for
running Gins and other machinery.
Prices lower than any other. We also
make Cotton Presses not excelled by
any other.
cotton gins and all classes of
machine work repaired in the best
manner. Castings furnished to order.
Raleigh, April 7, 1874. 1 3m
Office United States Marshal,
Eastern Dist. North. Carolina.
Raleigh, Sept. 1st, 1874.
Notice is hereby given to all persons
doing business with my office, particu
larly Clerks of Courts, Attorneys and
Counsellors at Law, that all papers and
Erocess for service in this District must
e sent to me directed to Raleigh, N. C.
I will not be responsible for any default
or unlawful acts of Deputies wherein
this notice is not strictly complied with.
J. B. HILL,
12 3m U. S. Marshal.
M ATTUKSS-IllAlHilW AMU
I I w
AWE-SEAT I NG. THESE
branches being taught in the North Car
olina Institution for the Deaf and Dumb
and the Blind, we are prepared to fur
nish Mattresses of the very best make
and material, and at cheap rates. Also,
to cane-seat chairs, settees, dec., &c
UIIOOITIS. We also have on hand a
large lot of excellent Brooms, which
will be sold cheap.
Address Institution for the Deaf and
Dumb and Blind, Raleigh. 2i. C.
itaieign, March 26, 1874. 3 3m
Cyff PIANOS AND ORGANS
U JJ new and second-hand, of first
class makers, will be sold at lower
prices for cash, or on installments, or
for rent, in city or country, during this
month, by Horace Waters fc Son, No.
481 Broadway, than ever before offered
in New York. Speciality : Pianos and
Organs to let until the rent money pays
the price of the instrument. Illustra
ted catalogues mailed. A large discount
to ministers, churches, schools, lodges,
fee, tc. 6 4w
INFORMATION WANTEDANY
information of MARIA MAN GIN
BROWN, whose maiden name is al
leged to have been Maria Charlotte So
phia Mangin, and wnose motners maid
en name was Sarah Kemp, will be
thankfully received. She is supposed
to be living in either North Carolina or
Virginia. Address,
W. M. BROWN,
Era office, Raleigh, N. C.
JOHN ARMSTRONG,
No. 1 Faykttevillk Street,
MALEIQMN. a,
B O O li B I N D B2 R ,
And Blank Rook Manufacturer.
Newspapers, ' Magazines, and Law
Books, of every description, bound in
the very best style, and at lowest price.
N
E
An occupation' as teacher, bearing at
least a second, grade certificate. Ifin-
formation be required address Wilson
ur. iiDin, .roan vx. nuns, jj. vv. tsagiey
and John Watts (whites) 'residing at
Williams ton, where I have been labor
ing as teacher for the last 1$ months.
J. H. JiEUUSTKKS, (colored,)
tebZ-tnntJ Williamaton, N.C.
"XTOTr S VUM TIME TO STECUllE
' Dargains. Jfrices suitable to the
umesv o Oil n5 -JXA.T. I BROWN; u
,-"V c Raleigh, NiC.
Raleigh, April 7, 1874. -lm.
MISCELLANEOUS.
Prospectus lor 1874 Seventh Tear.
THE AliDINE.
An Illustrated MournaZ, Universally
Admitted to be the Handsomest
t Periodical in the Word. A
Representative and Cham
vl ptonof American
W Taste
Not for sale in Book or News Stores.
THE ALDINE, while issued with all
the regularity, has none of the tem
porary or txmely interest characteristic
of ordinary periodicals. It is an ele
gant miscellany ot pure, light and grace
ful literature; and a collection of pic
tures, the rarest specimens of artistic
skill, in black and white. Although
each succeeding number affords a fresh
pleasure to its friends, the real Talue
and beauty of The Aldine will be most
appreciated after it has been bound up
at the close of the year. While other
publications may claim superior cheap
ness, as compared with rivals of a sim
ilar class, The Aldine is a unique and
original conception alone and unap
proached absolutely without compe
tition in price or character. The pos
nf a cnmnlfitfl volume cannot du-
I plicae the quantity of fine paper and
I fine-ravines in any other shape or num
ber of volumes for ten times its costs;
and then, there are the chromos. besides !
Art Department, 1874.
The illustrations of The Aldine have
won a world-wide reputation, and in
the art centres of Europe it is an ad
mitted fact that its woodcuts are exam
ples of the highest perfection ever at
tained. The common prejudice in favor
of "steel plates," is rapidly yielding to
a more educated and discriminating
taste which recognizes the advantages
of superior artistic quality with greater
facility of production. The wood cuts
of The Aldine possess all the delicacy
and elaborate finish ol the most costly
steel plate, while they afford a better
rendering of the artist's original.
To fully realize the wonderful work
which The Aldine is doing for the cause
of art culture in America, it is only
necessary to consider the cost to the
people of any other decent representa
tions of the productions of great pain
ters. In addition to designs by the mem
bers of the National Academy, and
other noted American artists, The Al
dine will reproduce examples of the
best foreign masters, selected with a
view to the highest artistic success and
greatest . general interest. Thus the
subscriber to The Aldine will, at a
trifling cost, enjoy in his own home the
pleasures and refining influences of
true art.
The auarterlv tinted plates-for 1874
will be by Thos. Moran and J. D.
Woodward.
The Christmas issue for 1874 will con
tain special designs appropriate to the
season, by our best artists, and will
surpass in attractions any of its prede
cessors. Premium for 1874.
Every subscriber to The Aldine for
the year 1874 will receive a pair of
chromos. The original pictures were
painted in oil for the publishers of The
Aldine.hy Thomas Moran, whose great
Colorado picture was purchased by
Congress for ten thousand dollars. The
subjects were chosen to represent "The
East" and "The West." One is a view
in The White Mountains, New Hamp
shire; the other gives The Cliffs of
Green River, Wyoming Territory.
The difference in the nature of the
scenes themselves is a pleasing dontrast,
and affords a good display of the artist's
scope and coloring. The chromos are
each worked froih thirty distinct plates,
and are in size (12x16) and appearance
exact fac-similes of the originals. The
presention of a worthy example of
America's greatest landscape painter to
the subscribers of The Aldine was a
bold but peculiarly happy idea, and its
successful realization is attested by the
following testimonial, over the signa
ture of Mr. Moran himself.
Newark, N. J., Sept. 20th, 18G3
Messrs. James Sutton fc Co.
Gentlemen, I am delighted with the
proofs in color of your chromos. They
are wonderfully successful representa
tions by mechanical process of the
original paintings.
Very respectfully,
Signed,) Thos. Moras.
These chromos are in every sense
American. They are by an original
American process, with material o
American manufacture, from designs
of American scenery by an American
painter, and presented to subscribers to
the first successful American Art uonr
nal. If no better because of all this,
they will certainly possess an interest
no foreign production can inspire, and
neither are !they any the worse if by
reason of peculiar facilities of produc
tion they cost the publishers only a
trifle, while equal in every respect to
other chromos that are sold singly for
double the subscription price of The
Aldine. Persons of taste will prize
these pictures for themselves not for
the price they did or did not cost, and
will appreciate the enterprise that ren
ders ther distribution possible.
If any subscriber should indicate a
I reference for a figure subject, the pub
ishers will send Thoughts of Home,"
a new and beautiful chromo, ljx20
inches, representing a little Italian exile
whose speaking eyes betray the long
ings of his heart.
Terms $5.00 per annum, in advance,
with Oil Chromos free.
For Fifth Cents Extra, the Chromos
will be sent, mouuted, varnished,
and prepaid by mail.
The Aldine will, hereafter, be obtain
able only by subscription. There will
be reduced or club rate ; cash for sub
scriptions must be sent to the publish
ers direct, or handed to the local can
vasser, without responsibility to the pub
lishers, except in cases where the cer
tificate is given, bearing the fac simile
signature of James Sutton fe Co.
Canvassers Wanted.
Any person wishing to act perma
nently as a local canvasser will receive
full and prompt information by apply
ing to
JAMES SUTTON & CO.,
Publishers,
23-tf 58 Maiden Iane, N. Y.
W. T. ADAMS & SON,
Manufacturers and Dealers in
steam: en ginks,
SAW AND tiltlST ItllLLS,
Plows, Harrows, Cultivators,
Ilositing' Macules,
and all kind of
CASTINGS.
All work neatly and promptly exe
cuted, by skilful workmen, on the most
reasonable terms.
Tne senior partner has had over 40
years experience in the business, and
feels justified in saying that he can give
entire satisfaction.
WANTED 100,000 pounds of old Cast
Iron, for which the highest market price
will be paid, in cash or exchange for
work. j
Works one Square AVcst of Court
House
Raleigh, Aug. 13, 1872.
w3m.
II . M A H L E K
! ,
if. ;
Manufacturer of
Gold and Silver-ware.
Also keeps constantly on hand
ALL THE LATEST STYLES OP FINE
Jewelry.- All kinds of repairing done with
neatness and diftpatch.
West Side of Fayetteville St.
- Opposite Metropolitan Halh
"7IXDUE HANJO, OUITAR AlfJJ
JU XYJf,ci&raK 8tnngs, Fiddle Bows,
Bridges, Pegs, Rosin, Aprons, fcc., at
! NAT. L. BROWN'S.
MISCELLANEOUS.1
R
TV
It
The Board of Directors of the N. c
State Penitentiary hereby offer a reward
of
FIFTY DOLLARS EACH
for the apprehension and return to them'
at the State's Prison. of the following
prisoners, who escaped on tho 'M (,r
September, 1874. -'
The Board have recommended to IIh
Excellency to pay the above amount
and he assures us that he will see th
same promptly paid at the return or the
convicts. ,
By order of the Board. '
M. GRAUSMAN, Sec'y
Raleigh, Sept. 4th, 1874.
Description of the Escaped Prison
ers: Abraham Anderson, col., from Greene
county, 26 years! old,5 feet 4 inches hiKh
sentenced October 20th, 1871, for 5 veum!
Richard Holmes, col., from N
Hanover county, 25 years old, 5 fVet,
inches high, sentenced April 21t,
for 5 years. I
Isaac Beasley, col., from Davidson
county, 24 years old, 5 feet, 7 in -h. s
high, sentenced April 28th, 1871, tor :;
years.
Benjamin Hunter, col., from ls,U ...
tank county, 23 years old, 5 feet, t ii,t i,.
es high, sentenced December lTtli, is: ;
for 5 years.
' . v-
LN BANKRUPTCY.
Notice is liEiiciir g i v r. ,
that a petition has been tiled in ti,
District Court of the United States f ,r
the Eastern District of North Carolina
by Benjamin F. Jenkins, of Granville
county, in said District, duly declare! a
Bankrupt under the act of Congress of
March 2d, 1867, for a discbarge and certi
ficate thereof from all his debts and other
claims provable under said act, ami that
the 26th day of Sept., 1874, at 10 o'clock,
A. M., at the office of A. W. ShallVr
Register in Bankruptcy, in Raleigh, N
C, is assigned, for the hearing of ti.
same, when and where all creditors,
who have proved their debts, and other
persons in interest, may attend an i
show cause, if any they have, 'why n10
prayer of the said petitioner should not
be granted. And that tlio second anl
third meetings will be held at the. Mann,
time and place.
New-Berne, N. C, August 31, ls: j.
GEO. E. TINKER, Clerk.
12 lav2w
BANKKUJPX SALE. On tlicj loth
day of November, 1874, at 10 o'clock,
A. M., at theCourt House dour, in
Raleigh, N. CTTl will sell to tho highest
bidder, for cash, the following real es
tate situate in Granville county, N. v.,
the nronertv of Thomas II. Uridite.
Bankrupt. 1281 acres of land lying on
the waters of New Light Creek, adjoin
ingthe lands of C. M. Rogers, J. F.
Dilliard and others. One half interest
in 167 acres of land known as the Mary
Haswell land, adjoining N. G. 'Whit
field, C. W. Lyman, A. S. Gill,; and
others. Also, the reversionary interest
in 1S5 acres of land lying on New Light
Creek, adjoining John Wilson, Robert
Garner and others.
ALEX. L. DAVIS, Assignee.
Raleigh, N. C, Sept. 2, 1874. 12-31
i ,
"VTPT,CE obdeb tiiebuo.-
JX BY THE KEG ISTEIf. Upon
the (foregoing application of John K.
O'Neill, Assignee of the estate of Ishani
Young, Bankrupt, it is ordered that ;
second general meeting of the creditor
of said Bankrupt be held at Baleigh, in
said district, on the 26th day of Septem
ber, A. D.,l71,'at 10 o'clock, A. M., at
the office of A. W. Shairor, one of th
Registers in Bankruptcy in said district,
for the purpose named in the-twemy
seventh section of tho Bankrupt Act"f
March 3d, 1So7. It is further orclcrt.i,
That the Assignee give notico of sai l
meeting by sending written or pi juti -l
notices by mail, post paid, of tin
time and place of said meeting to all
known creditors of said Bankrupt, an I
that he also notify the Bankrupt to l
resent thereat, and he shall also pun
ish notice of the time and place of sai l
meeting on two d liferent days in the
newspaper called . tne weekly ywi,
printed at Raleigh, N. C, at least t n
days prior to said meeting. Witm
my hand at Raleigh, in said District, on
the 3d day of September, A. D., 187 J.
A. W. SHAFFER,
12 3t. Register in Bankruptcy.
Aji that a petition has been filed in tin
District Court of the United States fr
the Eastern District of North Carolina
by Siou II. Rogers, of Wake county, in
said District, duly declared a liankruj t
under the Act of Congress of March - J,
1867, for a discharge and certilicafc
thereof from all his debts and otlw r
claims provable under said Act, anl
that the 26th day of September, 1871, at
10 o'clock, A. M.f at the ollice of A. W .
Shaffer, Register in Bankruptcy, m
Raleigh, N. C, is assigned for the hear
ing of the same, wheu and where all
creditors, who have proved their dU,
anA nthAr nrsoni in interest, may at
tend and show cause, if any they ha-,
why the prayer of the said petitioner
should not be granted. And that tlx'
second and third meetings will be lu-M
at the same time and place.
New-Berne, N. C, Aug. 31, 1874.
GEO. E. TINKER, Clerk.
Petitioner in Person, Attorney. 12 it.
TIHIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE, That
: on the 14th day of September, 171,
at 10 o'clock, a. m., at the Court House
door in Raleigh, N. C, I will sell to the
highest bidder for cash, tho reversion
ary interest of Sion II. Rogers, decease 1
bankrupt, in 83 acres of land, in Wako
county, N. C, adjoining Rufus Ivey,
J. R. Rogers and others. And also that
of a house and lot on Fayetteville stree t,
in the city of Raleigh, in said county,
adjoining Mrs. Haywood and others,
lata the office and residence of Sion H
Rogers, subject to all lawful lieu
thereon.
Raleigh, N. C, Aug. 27, 1874.
JOSHUA B. II I IX,
ll2t Assignee.
..
rpHIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE, That
JL on the 20th day of August, A. '
1874, a warrant in Bankruptcy was is
sued out of the District Court of Un
united States for the Eastern Distru t
of North Carolina, against tho estate t
Charles Homan, of Raleigh, in th '
county of Wake, and State of North
Carolina, who has been adjudged
Bankrupt on his own Petition:
That the payment of any debts,
and the delivery of any property bo
longing to such bankrupt, to him or
for his use. and the transfer of ! any
property, by him, are forbidden, by
law ; That a meeting of the creditors
of said bankrupt, to prove their debts
and to choose one or more assigned
his estate, will be held at a Court
Bankruptcy, to be holden at Raids'1,
N. C. before A. W. Shaffer, Reghp.
on the 5th day of September, A.
I.
1874, at 10 o'clock, A. M.
JOSHUA B. niLL,
Marshal as Messenger.
A. M. Lewis, Attorney. 10-3
rpHIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE, That I
JL
nave oeen sppomieu aiwh'"-"
estate and effects Of Charles H-
the
man, oi iiaieigu, .u ,
S, who was Adjudged
by the District Court of the Unite
States for the Eastern District of Nortn
Carolina.
J. II.FLtEMlWU, Aaiis,
-St
Raleigh, Sept. 8, 1874.
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view