North Carolina Newspapers

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New Car Guide
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Marching Angels
YWCA downtown center brings
back marching band and families.
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Winston
Chronicle
75 cents
The Twin City's Award-Winning Weekly
NEWS
BRIEFS
Black Political Power
WASHINGTON , DC? Recently released
data show a drastic rise in black political
^Doweron America over the last 20 years.
But growing black political strength
appears to be doing blacks little econom
ical good. According to the joint center
for political study in Washington, D.C.,
the number of blacks elected officials
now stands at 7,300-up dramatically
from less than 1000 when congress first
enacted voting in civil rights laws nearly
thirty years ago. In addition, tecent court
ordered redisricting is expected to
increase the number of African-Ameri
cans in congress from the current 26 to
over 40 after the Nov. 3 elections. How
ever, political growth is not translating
into economic empowerment. A recent
Census Bureau study found that poverty
among blacks has actually been increas
ing in recent years. Many experts feel
the greatest need for blacks in the 1990's
is to conquer poverty and the social
pathologies which flow from it.
Malcolm X movie delayed
Los Angeles , C4-The Spike Lee movie
Malcolm X is now in the middle of a
court battle which could delay the sched
uled Nov. 20 opening. The controversy
centers around the use in the movie of a
video showing the beating last^ March of
black motorist Rodney King by four
white police officers. The owner of the
video tape-George Holliday-has
demanded greater compensation or
removal of the scenes from the movie.
Lee counters that Holliday had agreed to
accept $50,000 for rights to use the tape.
If the dispute is not settled, the open of
the movie will be delayed.
Hastings Case
Miami FL- The recent "Un-impeach
ment" of former federal judge Alcee
Hastings has raised a major constitu
tional controversy. And Hasting says he
does not expect the controversy to be
resolved until the cause reaches the U.S.
Supreme Court. The controversy
emerged when a U.S. Senat^. district
judge through out Hastings' 1989
removal from the federal bench by the
U.S. senate. Hastings had been accused
of conspiring to accept a $150,000 bribe.
Hastings was the first black federal
judge ever expelled from the bench. The
federal government it will appeal the dis
trict court ruling.
Protest Shows Racism
New York , AT-New York black police
officers have denounced the recent
demonstration by fellow white officers
in which black mayor David Dinkins
was called a "Nigger". The white offi
cers were upset with a Dinkins decision
to create a civilian board to review
charges of police brutality and miscon
duct. Spokesman for the Black Officers,
Lloyd Finley, said white officers who
destroyed property and engaged in
offensive action during the demonstra
tions "should be arrested and punished."
Compiled hy the National Black News Survey (NBNS)
and Black America news Service (BANS).
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Family Evicted Over Children's Squabble
By SHERIDAN HILL
Chronicle Assistant Editor
When she opened her mail Sept. 15,
Brenda Brown was shocked to find a 30-day
eviction notice from Vista Realty owner Darla
Mullican.
The letter states that there have been
numerous complaints about the behavior of
Brown's two sons, and that she has been asked
repeatedly to "keep your children under con
trol."
She maintains that her children have been
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involved in typical adolescent behavior, and
the "crimes" they are charged with involved
white children who are still living at
Woodsmill Apartments on Jonestown Road.
But Brown's once-happy home has been dis
mantled. She moved out of her apartment, put
her belongings in storage, sent her 1 1 -year -old
back to live with his father, her 6-year-old to
live with his grandmbther, and she is staying
with a friend.
Brown doesn't understand what her chil
dren did that was so wrong.
"One time, two white girls and my little
boy took chalk and drew on the dumpster, but
they erased it," she recalled. "Another time,
my son and two white children were playing
with matches. The resident manager came to
visit me and said she didn't know who had the
matches, but was just letting all the parents
know."
The manager also charged that her son
was involved in an incident with a knife. But
as Brown explains it, her two children and sev
eral others were waiting at the bus stop one
morning when a disagreement arose. She says
both her son and a white girl made the idle
threat to go home and get a knife.
Please see page A2
Brenda Brown and her two sons were evicted from Woodsmlll
Apartments because of quarrels with white children.
Students at WSSU show their enthusiasm to encourage voting
Black Politicians Visit City
to Encourage People to Vote
By TRAVIS MITCHELL
Chronicle StafT Writer
In scenes reminiscent of the 60s freedom
rides, members of the U.S. Congressional
Black Caucus arrived in Winston-Salem ear
lier this week as part of a southern bus tour
designed to drum up support for a large black
voter turnout in November. This comes on the
heels of the first debate between presidential
candidates, George Bush, Bill Clinton and
Ross Perot.
'The election is less than a month away,"
said Atlanta Congressman John Lewis, former
- civtf rights activist and former director of the
Voter Education Project. "We must take deci
sive action by exercising the right to vote.
When more Americans vote, it renews the
strength and vitality of our political process.
We must vote on November 3 like we never
voted before." As a student Lewis was presi
dent of the Student Non- Violent Coordinating
Committee (SNCC), which contributed
Please see page A3
Bonham Sentenced to
Five Years in Sex Case
By TRAVIS MITCHELL
Chronicle Staff Writer
Rev. Bracy Herman Bonham,
Sr., 66, former pa&tor of Pitts
Memorial and Morningstar
Churches was sentenced test week
to five-years in prison after pleading
guilty to charges of attempted sex
ual assault bf a 17-year-old mentally
handicapped boy. In May, Bonham
was charged with two counts of sex
ual assault, which investigators say
occurred in July 1991 and Jan.
1992. Bonham's arrest shocked
many members of the community,
as he was a well respected leader.
As part of the plea bargain,
prosecutor Pansy Glanton dismissed
one of the charges and reduced the
other to second-degree sexual
offense. According to court offi
cials, the assaults took place at Pitts
Memorial and at the ministers
home.
Bonham's attorney, Todd
Burke, said that he has not spoken
with his client since last week and
"does not have the authority to
speak on the subject.'*
Initial psychological evalua
tions revealed that Bonham suffers
from what appears to be paranoid
schizophrenia and from coronary
disease. Judge Judson D. DeRamus,
Jr. of Forsyth Superior Court
ordered Bonham to go through fur
ther psychological and medical
evaluations and complete treatment
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Rev. B.H. Bonham, Sr.
for deviant sexual behavior. At
press time details surrounding the
evaluations were not available and it
was not known where Bonham
would be tested.
He is being held at the Forsyth
County Jail, but officials would not
say how long Bonham will be held
or to what destination he will be
transported.
"We don't feel good about
it(BonhanTs conviction)," said a
member of the Momingstar congre
gation, "but he is human being that
may have made a mistake and we
will be praying for him."
Bonham and his family could
not be reached for comment, how
ever sources indicate that he is in
good spirit.
Debate Reaction: Clinton, Perot Win, Bush Loses
By SHERIDAN HILL
Chronicle Assistant Editor
Reaction in the black community to Sunday night's
televised presidential debates shows Perot and Clinton
looking good, with President Bush dragging along
behind. A small informal sampling revealed that Chroni
s
cle readers feel Perot's delivery was appealing, but his
message lacked substance. Clinton delivered the most
information of all three debaters, they said, and Bush,
who was clearly on the defensive, came across in a neg
ative light.
Bessie Allen, retired schoolteacher and NAACP
Education Committee member: For my money, Clin
ton was the winner. 1 think Bush came through negative,
as he has throughout the campaign. Clinton was able to
contain himself. I know he wanted to explode, cause I
wanted to explode with him. Perot did about what I
expected. My problem is he addresses on}y the eco
nomic factor. He has never really said how he felt about
us. I was looking for factual information about what he
would do in the black community. I didn't hear that,
even in his economic program. He talked about cutting
Social Security, and that would hurt black folks. 1 didn't
hear him talk about how he would help the poor and the
needy. Clinton's program for moving welfare into work
force is a program I'm gonna hold him accountable for
if he's elected. They say he's done that in Arkansas.
Larry Womble, alderman southeast wardrl
thought Clinton looked best of all. He presented a com
petent, capable, efficient image. He presented a true
presidential kind of aura about him. He was not on the
defensive, but Bush was. Clinton's answers were logical
and made sense. For the most part he didn't' try to
hedge and dodge in his responses. He took the high road
when he could have gotten ugly and nasty. He gave me
the impression that he was the clear winner.
Mr. Perot came with a lot of one-liners, a lot of
quips, and wasn't clear as to what plan he would have,
as to what procedures and methods he would use. He
demonstrated he had some definite opinions but didn't
tell us how he would translate those opinions into
actions. I'm waiting to see that.
When Bush has a statement to read, he comes
across, but when he was answering questions, he
seemed fuzzy. He didn't do his hellfire and brimstone
'preaching.
Mutter Evans, owner WAAA radio: It's hard to
declare a winner, but if there was a loser, it was Bush.
When he was on the offensive, I thought he attacked
negatively.
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Clinton's lack of vocal strength was a real problem.
The voice breaking up, something that marginal could
be perceived as a weakness. Bill Clinton took full
advantage of looking into the television screen, but he
didn't appear to respond to the panelists, and that may
Pjlpase see page A2
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