North Carolina Newspapers

    -J lino- i 111-, v * »
High School Students
National Program Provides College Studies To 200.000
Brenda Woods
...Likes traveling
David Pankey
...Ma Bell salesman
n oocts, r^ankey Join
Ma Bell Sales Staff i
By Sidney Moore Jr.
0 Post Staff Writer
An easing of the once stress
ed economy seems to be pro
viding better job opportuni
ties.
Brenda Woods and David
Pankey, directory advertising
sales representatives for Sout
hern Bell, say they are exam
ples that opportunity does
exist.
' The two are part of a 36
member sales team that can
vasses North Carolina selling
yellow pages advertising each
year. They work in six-person
crews and travel nine or 10
months per year over the
state.
“I like the traveling because
1 like to meet different peo
Priorities Set
ForNewGty
Transit System
The City’s Transit Planning
Office this week announced
priorities in planning, service
and capital improvements for
the first year of City owner
ship of the Charlotte Transit
System. Planning for the first
year ranks first in importance
as short range goals and ob
jectives will be set. At the top
yww wnwinpriniiUij tmc
the completion of a new
Transit Development Pro
gram (TDP) for the Charlotte
area. A TDP is a short-term
(5-year) plan, revised and
updated annually, which
states the goals. Dolicies and
budget for the system. U is
both a need of City Council and
a requirement of the Federal
government.
During Bus Week many peo
ple voiced complaints about
existing schedules and sche
dule adherence. The Transit
Planning Office has been mov
ing to solve these top priority
service improvement needs.
New, easier-to-read schedules
will be made available in
September. Two new supervi
sors will be hired to combat
schedule unreliability. The
Transit Planning Office will
make monthly schedule ad
herence checks throughout the
year to identify other problem
areas.
Several capital improve
ments are also slated for the
neaMutur^^^^^^^^^^
1 *
pie , said woods, a 28-year
old divorcee who has two
children.
A former University of
North Carolina at Asheville
student, she met members of
the Southern Bell sales crew
while working part-time in an
Asheville motel restaurant
where the crew was staying.
She was impressed by the
people she met and their job.
After taking the suggestion
of one of the sales representa
tives to apply for a sales
position, she was hired.
Six months later. Woods
says she finds the job as
exciting as she anticipated it
might be.
Pankey, 27, of Winston Sa
lem has a year's experience to
his credit as a yellow pages
salesman. He anticipates
earning $20,000 his second
year on the job and says that
salary says a lot about oppor
tunities at Southern Bell for
qualified applicants.
Other than the money, Pan
key says the training program
for sales personnel is out
standing.
“The training program
we’ve got can turn a sheep into
a tiger,' he said.
Pankey was referred to Sou
thern Bell by a friend who
works for the Urban League.
“It’s the best thing that has
ever happened to me," said
display mi
tiative. You don’t have any
body breathing down your
back," he said.
A Southern Bell official said
the company fills sales repre
sentative openings using a
selection process that takes
about 60 days. He said the
company is interested in ap
plicants that are seeking a
career.
The jobs are first bidded for
by company employees. If
employees perfer to remain in
their present jobs, an appli
cant is considered.
. Such applicants are usually
already on file, said the offi
cial. He indicated that apply
ing for such a position is a long
range prospect rather than
seeking to fill an immediate
opening.
The official pegged first
year salaries (plus commis
sion! for the job within a range
of from *13,500 to *16,500. He
said no prior sales experience
is required.
-“-1
AUGUST 10 f
★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★
Free Prizes
To The First Fifty People Who Come By
r
See Our
3 Show Rooms
mcuMiala
$500,000 Mnw
* /
Worth Of Merchandise
McDonald's Furniture Hut Inc.
1518 Beatties Ford Road
If You Don’t See It Please Ask For It
a, ■ ■ ■■ —
what do these high school
students have in common?
A New Jersey high school
senior studying the Blooms
bury poets
A high school sophomore in
Alaska researching U.S. labor
history.
A junior performing ad
vanced physics experiments
in a Florida high school
This fall, these and some
200,000 other students in high
schools across the nation are
beginning college-level stu
dies which may qualify them
for college credit, advanced
standing, and cost savings at
more than 1,400 American
Colleges and universities.
Some may even enter college
as sophomores.
For the past 20 years, the
Advanced Placement (APi
Program of the College En
trance Examination Board
has been helping highly moti
vated and talented students
like these learn college-level
subjects in high school
"Advanced Placement is re
cognized and widely accepted
by the nation's public and
private colleges and universi
ties, including some of the
most prestigious,” said Har
lan Hanson, director of the
College Board program. "The
student who earns three or
four AP credits receives im
mediate sophomore standing
or its equivalent at more than
100 colleges and universities,
including Brandeis. Harvard,
Northwestern, Princeton,
Stanford, Vasser. and Yale,
and the state universities of
Maryland, North Carolina,
and Utah," he said.
The program can also save
college costs, a crucial factor
to most parents and students
today, Dr. Hanson said. "We
eslimate that the average AP
student saves $400, but sav
ings can amount to $12,000 or
more for the student who uses
the program to shorten college
time to three years and enter
the job market a year ear
lier."
Research has shown that AP
students continue to earn a
bove-average grades in col
lege and are more likely to
graduate with honors than
non-AP students. Ninety per
cent of them consider their
advanced courses as the most
valuable of all their high
school studies
After a year of independent
or classroom study in higli
school, students take standar
dized examinations in May to
verify their learning. AP of
fers 20 exams in 13 college
subjects. American history,
art (history and studioi, bio
logy. chemistry, English. Eu
ropean history, French (lan
guage and literature), Ger
man, classics (Virgil and ly
ric). mathematics (two calcu
lus exams), music, physics
(three exams), and Spanish
(language and literature).
The most recent addition, this
year, is Spanish language
Students may take the e
xams as early as tenth grade
las over 1,700 did last May),
but the greatest number take
them in their senior year.
Each AP student may take
any number of the three-hour,
objective, short-answer and
essay exams for a fee of $32
each.
Even though 3.000 of the
nation's 31.500 high schools
provide AP courses to their
students today, most students
who could benefit from the
program know nothing about
it and discover it too late, in
college catalogs. Dr Hanson
said "This is particularly
unfortunate when you consid
er the low cost of providing an
- Advanced Placement course
for these students." he said
"A school'may provide an AP
course bv relieving a teacher
from study or cafeteria
duty, by running classes
y
smaller than average, hv
adding required readings or
lab work to existing honors
and advanced sections, or by
cooperating with other
schools. Faculty may also
supervise the studies of indm
dual students as they prepare
for the examinations."
The College Board helps
schools establish AF pro
grams through consultants or
teacher conferences in large
districts, and. for smaller
I
ones, lists of experienced Al*
teachers from nearby districts
for informal consultations
"AP is good news for com
mutinies that have high aspi
rations for their children. Ur
Hanson said It increases the
students' options, and helps
them develop the self-confi
donee, independence, and stu
d> skills that will help them
achieve in college We hope
more communities will take
ad\ antago ol n
i
Washington’s Shoe Service
Expert Shoe Repair Service
Abtary Public
ROBERT B. WASHLNGTt > Y < >h r.er
2622 STATESVILLE AVE.
Business 332-3723 Home Phone 399-1672
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY: Each of these advertised items is required to
be readily available for sale at or below the advertised price in each A&P Store,
except as specifically noted in this ad.
HEAVY western grain fed beef
■jjutW |^£J B|ffiH T-BONE STEAKS -ssr*
tKt ^:f:y ground beef *?■
Hfl^T DINNERS _ MINI MEALS-.
• SALISBURY STEAMS • IOR«EY
CROOUE TIES • SPAG A MEAT bails •BEE*'. 07 • ME AT lOAT » 07 -
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pkl! 98< 2 ' 88<
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>ON CTNS
#63
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fTj&P SUGAR!
i — 5 68(
5 M.'i) *JH #64
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| SEALTEST LIGHT & LIVELY
ICE MILK
.
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GOOD thru sat aug 7 1976 at aap^/
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P«*CI %PRlO€ • QQUPQN* PRICES PRIDE
SOFT DRINKS
• W.THTM.S Q R] (
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: fni
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SARA LEE FROZEN |6 TO A PKG )
CUP CAKES :-l
all oeliCioos flavors
LOOK-FIT YOGURT
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2 BOWLS 88C 0^
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