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RAY OF SUNSHINE
Increased minutes
mean production for
rookie Felton/1 C
Raymon Felton is
Eastern Conference
ikie of the month.
MARKETING MIRACLE
Want to start a network?
Podcasting eliminates the
middleman to create a link
with audiences/7C
I/WES B. DUKE MCMORIAf-
IT S OK TO JUST
HORSE AROUND
Charlotte Jumper
Classic combines
competition with
education/1 B
JOHNSON C. SMITH UNIVERSITY
CHARLOTTE, N. C, 28216
$1.00
The Voice of the Black Community
Also serving Ce
28216 SIO PI
James 8. Duke Library
100 Beatties Ford Rd
Charlotte NC 28216-5302
Anger
tempered
by some
bitterness
Attack ofN.C.
Central student
rallies Durham
By Nedra Pickier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DURHAM — The alleged rape
of a exotic dancer hired by the
Duke University lacrosse team is
uniting African Americans. It’s
also bringing to hght long-sim
mering frustrations with the uni
versity and its perceived privi
lege.
Duke President Richard
Brodhead has suspended the
remainir^ lacrosse season and
op^ed dialogue with blade lead
ers, including N.C. Central
Chancellor James Ammons. The
victim is a 27-year-old student at
NCCU- A court order was used to
obtain DNA samples frxjm 46 of
the players, but so far no one has
been arrested.
The Tribune talked to a few of
Durham’s Afiican-American resi
dents and asked if they were sat
isfied with the way the investiga
tion is goir^.
Sojo Ologbenla, a Nigerian now
hving in Durham;
‘T think it’s sad, but I think
eventually they wiU get them and
punish them.”
Jackie (didn’t want to give last
name), Durham native:
“I definitely don’t thirk the
investigation is going fast
enough.”
Frank White, technical consul
tant for a local Internet business
“My initial feeling is the dty of
Durham should make no excep
tion just because tiiey are stu
dents at Duke. They shouldn’t be
See ANGER/3A
CHANCE AT RICHES
PHOTO/WADE NASH
Sonjay Patel hands Darryl Smith of Charlotte $20 after winning a scratch-off game at Stop and Go on
South Tryon Street. Smith said he’ll keep playing the N.C. Education Lottery, which opened last week.
“I spent $3. This was just something to do.”
You scratch,
state wins
Hype meets hope in first week of North Carolina lottery
By Chens F. Hodges
cherisJiodgesS Ihecharlotteposteom
On opening day for the
N.C. Education Lottery,
Darrjd Smith scratched off a
ticket and won $20.
Excitedly, he prodaimed
that he was a winner as he
walked up to Sanjay Patel,
owner of Stop and Go on
South Ttyon Street.
“This is my neighborhood
store and this is where I’m
going to come and buy my
lottery tickets,” he said as he
paid for more. ‘T spent $3.
This was just something to
do.”
In a stretch of less than a
mile between South Tiyon
Street and West Boulevard,
thei'e are five lottery retail
ers. The neighborhood is
predominately black and
lower income. Few of the
retail stores are owned by
blacks. But that doesn’t
bother Smith.
‘T hadn’t really been pay
ing atten
tion to
who’s mak
ing the
money, I’m
just trying
to get some
money, you
know what
I’m saying? I
don’t care
who’s getting tiie money but
See YOU SCRATCH/2A
Protesters’ message to Bush: Re-prioritize
By Eric Bozeman
FOR IHE CHARLOTTE POST
President Bush will be
met with three protest
groups when he speaks in
Charlotte today at Central
Piedmont Community
College.
Action Center for
Justice, Move On, and
Code Pink are pretesting
the war in Iraq, as well as
responding to rumors of
Uie president drumming
up interest in bombing
Iran.
“Some of the' main
things we are going to be
pretesting is the fraqi war,
the new (rumblings of)
war on Iran,” said David
Dixon, coordinator for
Action Center for Justice.
“We are also pretesting
the Katrina survivors
being left on their own
when the hurricane hit
and now.”
Action Center for Justice
is expecting to turn out
between 50 to 100 sup
porters in fiont of CPCC to
voice its displeasure of the
Bush administration’s
handling of civil rights,
immigrant rights, military
spending, as well as call
ing for Bush’s impeach
ment.
“Bush started going on
tour aroTuid the third
anniversary of the Iraqi
war trying to drum up
support for it,” Dixon said.
“Fm anti'anybody who
supports the war, whether
they are Republican or
Democrat. Anytime when
there’s a crime committed,
you find who did it and fol
low the rules of the law.”
! See PROTESTS/6A
Health center has new name, dedication to underserved
PHOTOAVADE NASH
Dr. Kenneth Chambers (from left) Dr. John Murphy, Peggy Beckwith and Rowe
Motley listen during a press conference announcing the name change of C.W.
Williams Community Health Center.
By Cheris F. Hodges
ctterisJiodges®tliecharloneposi£om
Phyhss Caldwell beheves
she’s cancer-fi^ today because
of the doctors at C.W. Williams
Community Health Cent^.
The center, which was former
ly named Metrolina
Comprehensive Health Center,
changed its name because it
wanted to refocus on compas
sion health care to the commu
nity
Caldwell can attest to the
care.
“This center has been a bless- '
ing to me. I believe today that I
don’t have breast cancer
because Dr. Chambers formd
Newman
nodules in my breast. It’s made
a difference for me and it can
make a difference for all of the
citizens of Charlotte
Mecklenburg,” she said.
That was tiie vision of Dr.
Charles Warren Williams,
Charlotte’s first African
American surgeon, when he
started the center in 1981. The
goal of the center, located on
Wilkinson Boulevard, was to
reach out to the poor and med
ically underserved.
The original name of the cen
ter was C. W. Winiams Heath
Center. Later it was renamed
Metrolina.
See HEALTH/6A
suruey;
Tourney
a slam
dunk
CIAA visitors give week
in Charlotte thumbs-up
By Herbert L. White
herb.white® thecharloriepost com
The first CIAA basketball tourna
ment in Cliarlotte was nothing but
net.
A survey of visitors released by the
Charlotte Regional Visitors
Authority revealed fans liked the
new site and 99 percent
said they would return.
“This is significant in
that we can extol the
virtues of Charlotte as
a destination through
out the year, but when
99% of those surveyed
would attend another
special event and would
recommend visiting
Charlotte to a fiiend or relative, we
know we’ve succeeded in sharing our
vision of the Queen City” said Tim
Newman, CEO of the CRVA.
The survey conducted by CRVA
Research Director Mike Applegate,
was based on iJie return of 336 indi
vidual responses that rated CTAA
activities from venues to entertain-
Please see CHARLOTTE/3A
the box
NEWS, .NOTES & TRENDS
Ojaide wins
: UNCC’s top
faculty honor
By Herbert L. White
herb,whUeS thecluirloliepostrom
Tanure Ojaide’s research in
addressing African issues has
earned him UNC Charlotte’s
highest faculty award.
The UNC Charlotte Afiicana
studies professor
' earned the First
Citizens Bank
Scholars Medal For
his scholarship and
research on behalf
of Afiica and dedi
cation to the critical
issues facing the
Afiican people..
“First Citizens is
i proud to present this award to Dr.
Ojaide and to recognize his contri
butions in literature and poetry
and to the field of Afiicana stud
ies,” WiUiam Braddy the bank’s
Mecklenburg area executive said
. in a statement. ‘We are honored
to have a role in rewarding Dr.
Ojaide’s achievements and work,
and we value our longstanding
partnership with the university”
Ojaide’s work was recognized at
■ a banquet this wedc at the Westin
Ojaide
Please see UNCC /3A
Was Jesus’ crucifixion
^ politically-motivated?.5B
LifelB
Religion 5B
Sports 1C
Business 70
A&E 1D
Happenings 60
INSIlf
To subscribe, call (704) 376-0496 or FAX (704) 342-2160.© 2005 The Charlotte Post Publishing Co.
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