North Carolina Newspapers

    grandma’s hands
More grandmothers are
raising their children’s *
children /1B
Hattie Anthony of Charlotte,
sitting, raised granddaughter
Ebony Moore-Roach
he’s in the ‘thik’
,OF THINGS
Publisher Cecil
Dowdell launches
magazine for the
average women/1 D
Volume 31 No. 34
$1.00
CiiartotrS £
lit
The Voice of the Black Community
Also serving Cabarrus, Chester, Mecklenburg, Rowan and York counties
Gorman’s urban pledge
New Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent touts big-district experience"^
PHOTO/CURTIS WILSON
Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Superintendent
Peter Gorman takes a question from Gyasi Foluke
during the Tuesday Morning Breakfast Forum .
Grand
Strand
preps for
bikers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MYRTLE BEACH - The
South Carolina Grand
Strand will host hundreds of
thousands of bikers starting
this weekend and running
through the end of the
month.
Residents either love or
hate the two annual bike ral
lies that have continued to
grow despite some efforts to
downsize the events and
increased restrictions and
regulations.-
The first event is the Harley
Davidson rally, which has
been held for 66 years at
Myrtle Beach.
The rally begins Friday and
is expected to draw about
300,000 bikers. ^
Bikers will have to adjust to
one-way traffic on Ocean
Boulevard that will be new
this year. The change in traf
fic is the result of the settle
ment of a lawsuit between
the city and the National
Association for the
Advancement of Colored
People.
The NAACP had sued
because the city requires one
way traffic during the
Atlantic Beach bike rally that
comes later this month. The
crowd at the rally is predomi
nantly black. The Harley
crowd is predominantly
white.
Bikers also will have to
watch their noise. North
Myrtle Beach police cracked
do'wn on noise violations last
year, writing 368 tickets with
a $129 fine for noise viola
tions.
This year, Myrtle Beach
Please see GRAND7A
By Chens F. Hodges
cherishodges®lhecharlotieposlx:o>n
New Charlotte-
Mecklenburg Schools
Superintendent Peter
Gorman says urban educa
tion is close to his heart and
plans to make himself and
the public accountable for
the education of all stu
dents.
On Tuesday morning,
Gorman met with a group of
mostly Afncan Americans at
the Tuesday Breakfast
Forum at West Charlotte
Recreational Center. After
being introduced by school
board member George
Dunlap, Gorman told the
crowd about his background
in urban school en'viron-
ments.
“I was a second grade
teacher in Orange County,
Florida, and I taught at an
inner city school,” he said.
After moving on to teach
middle school, Gorman said
he moved into administra
tion, ultimately becoming
chief financial officer of
Orlando’s school district.
“This was a school system
that had failed on a tax ref
erendum, and had chal
lenges with achievement
gaps,” he said.
Charlotte-Mecklenburg is
experiencing similar issues.
According to a report fixim
Wake County Judge
Howard Manning, “When
the Court reviewed the
Charlotte Mecklenburg
Schools ...performancecom
posite scores, the high
school composite scores
jumped out like a ‘sore
thumb.’ CMS supports its
See SUPERINTENDENT/3A
CLOSING ONE CHAPTER, OPENING ANOTHER
PHOTO/WADE NASH
Video camera in hand, Livingstone College graduate Moises Gordon of Patterson, New Jersey, can barely
contain his enthusiasm during commencement at Alumni Stadium Saturday.
Emotions are as
much a part of gradua
tion day as “Pomp and
Circumstance.”
At Livingstone
College in Salisbury
and Johnson C. Smith
University in
Charlotte, both were
evident last weekend.
Hugs, kisses and tears
were the order of the
day on both campuses
as the schools sent the
Class of 2006 into the
next chapter of their
lives.
After the marching
and long speeches,
was the part everyone
waited for - after grad
uation celebrations
with family and
fnends.
Herbert L. White
PHOTO/CALVIN FERGUSON
Jeruelle Fort’s tears of joy helped bring Johnson C. Smith University’s com
mencement to a close Sunday at Cricket Arena. U.S. Rep. James Clyburn (D-S.C.)
was commencement speaker for the Class of 2006, which had 226 graduates.
Rice: Expect a minority president - just not me
By William C. :Mann
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Secretary of
State Condoleezza Rice says
she expects to see a U.S. presi
dent from an ethnic minority
In Real Estate: Deck trends
for makeovers/4D
during her lifetime, but it will
not be her.
Rice’s audience of young
Latinos laughed and applauded
when she said it Friday, and
she responded with an embar
rassed grin.
Rice, who is black, has been
asked repeatedly whether she
plans to run for the open
Republican candidacy in 2008,
when her boss, President Bush,
completes his second term and
cannot run again. She is consid
ered a prospect for the 2008
GOP nomination in some
Republican circles despite her
protestations that she’s not
interested in running.
On Friday, a young man from
Please see RICE/7A
Sudan
help now
welcome
Taskforce proposes
options to improve N.C.
health care coverage
By Mohamed Osman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KHARTOUM, Sudan - Sudan
would welcome the help of the United
Nations in Darfur to implement a
peace agreement between Khartoum
and one of the rebel groups, despite
the country’s initial resistance, a gov
ernment spokesman said.
Bakri Mulah, secretary-general for
external affairs in the Information
Ministry, was speaking a day after the
agreement was reached in Abuja,
Nigeria. His comments Saturday
opened the door for the possibility that
Sudan could accept U.N. peacekeep
ers to replace the thousands of Afncan
Union peacekeepers now in Darfur.
The Sudanese government had ini
tially rejected calls for deplo3dng a
U.N, force.
“We heard the appeal of the U.N.
secretary general.... Now there is no
problem,” he said. “The Sudan govern
ment wiU be open for any assistance.
It wfil not reject or oppose any effort
either from the EU (European Union)
or from the United States or from the
United Nations in realizing peace in
Darfur on the grounds of this agree
ment,” he told The Associated Press in
English.
But later Saturday, Egypt’s Middle
East News Agency quoted Mulah as
saying; "It is too early to talk about
Please see SUDAN/3A
I
the box
NEWS, NOTES & TRENDS
Role models
get together
for kids
The Males Place is tipping off its
2th annual Then Role Model All-
Star Basketball Classic May 19 at
Johnson C. Smith University’s
Grimes Lounge. The classic recog
nizes young people who are
achieving academically and as ciU
izens.
The Role Model event includes a
pizza party, banquet for partici
pants and basketball game with
the all-stars taking on a team of
community leaders and celebri
ties.
The program, sponsored by
Mecklenburg County, includes an
involvement education series that
continues through June 7.
For information, call Reggie
Singleton at (704) 336-6423 or
Keith Cradle at (704) 336-5337.
Herbert L. White
ooo
Life IB
Religion 5B
Sports 1C
Business 7C
A&E ID
Happenings 6C
INSIOi
To subscribe, call (704) 376-0496 or FAX (704) 342-2160.© 2006 The Chariotte Post Publishing Co.
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