North Carolina Newspapers

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TOWN' IIIHKITOKY.
\ i; W i>N, .Mayor.
i r. Voi \i, }
.1. il.
T. MOOBK, Coniuiii-nioners.
I* 11. HOOK,
M 1.. A!»!•", Mur.sh il.
Oh il relics.
Mr I HOI.ISI Iter. Ceo. T. Simmons, !
I'astor. S rviecs at 7p. m. every i
First Sunday, mid 11 a. in. and 7p. |
in. > very Fourth Sunday.
J'lnyer-inecting every W dnesduy
Slight lit 7 > elock.
Sundav-scliool every Sunday morn- (
ing ut l) o'clock, G. K. Grantham,
Mipcrinteiiili nt.
Meet of Si in i lay - school Missiotin
j v Society every Ith Sunday after
noon.
Yum# M u's Pray- r-nictiiig every
Monday night.
I'/. kv ri:ui an Rev. A. M. Huss -li, ;
I'astor.
rviecs every First and Fifth Sun- I
•In at 1 I a. in. and 7p. m.
Sunday school every Sunday even- !
atl o'clock, i)r. .1. A. Daniel,
Superintendent.
|t .i ii'i.i's Rev. .1. .1. Harper, Pastor, i
S. i vices every Third Sunday at II
>i in. and 7 p. in.
suriday-s.'hool every Sunday at 2
o'clock, i'rot. \\. ('. Williams, Su
perintendent.
I'rayt : -i:i; etin# every Thursday ;
night at 7 o'clock.
MISSIONAUY I.AI'TIST Uev. N. H. Cold),
D. D., I'astor.
S. rvices every Second Sunday at 11
a. in. an 1 7 p. m.
Sunday school every Sunday morn- ;
ingnt 10 o'clock, R. G. Taylor. Sil-
JM rintendelit.
I'rayer meeting every Thursday
night at •">::{i» o'clock.
J'uKK-Winn BAPTIST Rev. J. 11. War
lev. Pastor.
Services every Fourth Sunday at 11
a. m. Sunday school every Sunday
 veiling at o'clock, Erasmus Lee, j
superintendent.
PRIMITIVE HAPTIST Elder Burnice j
Wood, Pastor.
Services every Third Sunday at II i
a. m. and Saturday before the Third !
Sunday at II a. in.
LFK J. REST, Attorney at Law, j
Dunn, N. ('. Practice in all the
courts. Prompt attention to all
business. jan 1
W. F. MURCHISON, Attorney" at j
Law, Jonesboro, N. C. Will prac- I
tice in all the surrounding counties, j
jan 1
DP. J. H. DANIEL, Dunn, Harnett
county, N. C. Cancer a specialty.
No other diseases treated. Posi
tively will not visit patients at a dis
tance. Pamphlets on Cancer, its
Treatment and Cure, will be mailed j
f'» any address free of charge.
A NEW LAW FIRM.
D. 11. McLean and .1. A. Farmer
Inve this day associated themselves |
together in the practice of law in all
Ihe courts of the state.
Collections and general practice so-!
licited.
D. 11. MI LKAN, of Lillington, N. C. ,
•I. A. FAKMEI?, of Dunn, N. C.
may 1 1,
* -FOR THE HEALING OF TOE NATIONS— * !
Blood Balm i
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iti.oon IUL*I ro„ Atlanta, On. *
i WIi&TJCR S I
IXTI'RX ATiOXM.
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5 nral features of tlic p:lobe; partii ulars eon- c
5 Jioted fn titiotis j ersons and places; S
S translation of foreign quotations. It i» 111- S
) valuable in the home, office, study, and J 1
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€ ' ' ten: " rbe Inlcrmulonal Dictionarj .. #
5 ol dictionaries. I commend i«> g 1
1 great (fauularil aatlii rity." j ,
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J J-vtry State Superintendent of # 1
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C lil"l-T. ■ 11. . 1 f ■ I
THE CENTRAL TIMES.
DR. J. H. DANIEL, Editor anl Proprietor
vol.. IV.
COUN.ING APPLESEEDS.
; Turtle tl.e hc-urth one w nter
j Made rosy by the g cat leg's ligh',
llmt rtaniirg up tn«-  j,ini!iey dark,
I'it every i raonv ev.erv 1 00k,
t I on tlm rag a lilt le 10 iin
| Sat curled, In pose dun arc and staid.
In pensive mood. wiih dronmv even
She sits, while up ih; 1 h.niney fli h
A 'h i:ght with eve y her 1 simrk
B nd tliroi gh the dark,
J ill wi ii a Mgli pro'o.;nd «'id deep
moves, one moves i.i her slec-p.
A rosv npp'e in lie- hsn l
A weight of thought seems to demand.
• no tuj h it w it ii a fing..*r
i hen eniefully she ti. KCS a bite.
Anoth ir Li.e, no*  m-, now two —
I he euro is thus esp sed to view.
Another sij-h! what can it lit
My lifle maid t at a:leth thee?
An: whut is this: n >I1!« incantation?
fluttered with sia-'.i r-- Icrati n:
l.ark : an each se.-d l.er bight eyes seo,
' hose ar o the wcrds thai c me to me:
"One I love, two lo* e
'lhrei- I lave 1 !
I'o .r 1 lo e with i ll my heart,
hive- I Ci.s„ away" •
Hern a *enr roil- I iowa
hat the secret t.he iia» won?
Who can any 1 Put liiHt, behind
Bounds a voice so so t ai d kind:
*Lo>k again : Thou mu-t indeed
1 iud for mo anotl.er seel I"
Itifiier her bright glovr
lt« the firelight s ruld> f;low,
Sure euoi.ghl aeulpiit i-ejd,
Fin Is she In the C' re in eel '
"Fioin thy lips I fi in v.ould hear 1
What the bi\th one means, my
"Six ho loveV sho murmured IOT, I
And tt.o firelight's I'.i ki ring glow,
Two happy fa-es 11 >\v ■ isclo e
Wi h cheeks allowing likJ tlio roso.
But hero well let the  uriain fall
For the Ind is be-t of all.
—A. U. G., in .-acri 1113:1:0 I'nion.
i LAWYERS DREAM.
The follawfr g story is based upon fact. It
n lates ilie e 1 perieaee of iho lav yer for the
pi' secution in the roma ksbH case of Warren '
titurgii, tried twenty-five j ears ago the mur
der of his nil -le, holomon Stuig s, a wealthy
resident of Dixon, 111)
Fatigued in mind »nd body, sorely
perplexed by the intricate character
of the conflicting testimony to wh ch
1 hud listened, I left the Dixon Court
J louse at 5 o'clock and went to a
restaurant for a cup of coffee. I
could not withdraw my mental fac
ult es from the conflict of the day,
nor lose for a moment the sad, re
proachful naze of the prisoner. I
had felt almost a vengeful spirit at
first, because of the unusual atrocity !
of the circumstan c Let me detail
Uiern as brie y as possible.
Warren Sturyis was a youner man
«rho had nrown up n the town, and
was well liked, albeit he had a quick
temper,iwh ch accompanies a warm,
generous dispos tion. If he ofTended
anyone in hi-; anger, be asked for
giveness as soon as li s anger had
cooled, lie was open and above
board in all his dealings, and although
t'NTI JJ HALF TIIIC VILLAGE STOOD BY
IMS BEDSIDE.
he had not distinguished himself by
the accomplishment of any energetic
work in his twenty-four years, he had
not been an idler. It was acknowl
edged on all sides that his uncle, for i
whose dastardly murder he was being
tried, had been really an impediment
to the.young man's success Old Mr.
Sturgis had kept the boy dandling
about him, waiting on him, and
studying how to humor lm caprices.
The old man had aJso kept him well
under, and nagged him  onstantiy,
interfering with lii> nleasures and
unsettling him iu his business: and
Jt was said by the old housekeeper,
who was the only other inmate of
the house, and almost in her dotage,
that they quarreled every night but
made up the next morning.
Old Solomon Sturgis was not on
speaking terms witli his only brother, j
many years younger than himself, and
when he was dead ir, was found that
he had not mentioned him in h:s
will, but left all bus estate without
reserve to Warren St urgis. his nephew*
The manner of t ie old man's death
was bungling and frightful. The
housekeeper testified to hearing a
noise in the night She said the
uncle and nephew had quarreled as ,
usual, and she heard the young man
say, "I'll get even with you yet," as
he went up stairs to liis room. Later
on, she had heard Miunds of strange
imp rt, doors open and shut, but had
felt no alarm, supposing it was War
ren going in an 1 out.
Young Murgis claimed that iie had
heard nothing, hut swore be slept
soundly the whole night, not awa v
ing in tho morning unt 1 half the vil
lage stood by bis bedside to tell him
that his uncle had been found dead, j
murdered, and bis Uidy thrown into
i well which was common property
vith the neighbors.
'•Dead!" The boy flung himself
Into his clothe* and would have
rushed from the room but the detain
ing hand of the 1 eputy Mieriif pre
vented him.
"It's only a matter of form. Warren:
we none of us believe you had any
thing to do with it," he said, but he
slipped the handcuffs on him as he
said it. The truth was, everybody
believed hiui guilty, because there
had been no ro bery, and he was the
only one to whom the old man's
death would be a L. netlt, and it was
supposed that he had struck and
killed him in a temper, and then
thrown the boclv into the well to
make it look like .;u accident. The
horrible mutilation of the dead man's
face, which made :t almost unrecog- i
ni/able, was supposed to be due to
abrasions received in the well. Al-
IHNN, 11A RN KI T '().. X. TIIURSDA V. MA Y 31.18!>4.
together th"s affair looked carticu
larly black for the young man. who,
if he had done the deed, deserved
hanging, since he would make no
confession, and there were no extenu*
atlng circumstances
A few did not believe him guilty.
His sweetheart was one: a few of his
vo ing friends and mi'self, the lawyer
for the prosecution, who had a long
, familiarity with criminal tactics 1
hesitated and doubted be
cause of the lack of any but circum
stantial evidence and also from a
careful study of the young man h'm
selr. If he had committed the crime,
j WOMAX IN' lIf.ACK ADVANCING TO '
j SPEAK TO ME.
he was also capable of plaving the
hypocrite, but It seemed to me that
his sorrow over the death of his rela
tive was sincere.
"Poor old man," he would say,
"who could have borne him such a
grudge? I did not knew that he had
an enemy in the world!"
The defense was conducted by a
law>er retained by the brother of the
murdered man, who seemed to hold
no ill will to the nephew-heir. lie
did not believe the young man guilty
and said so in a very impressive man
ner. 1 had been making my speech
to the jurv, addressing each man in
turn, as was customary in our prac
tice. but I had made no attempt at
oratory or sensation, asking them to
weigh the evidence well, taking into
consideration all the attendant cir- I
eumstances, and to deal justly with
| the prisoner, if they believed him
guilty.
I'erhaps it was my quiet manner
| that impressed them, but 1 felt when
1 finished that I had convicted the
prisoner, that their \erdict would,
without doubt. I e "guilty of murder
in the first degree," and I was for
once sorry to see the ends of justice
served, and that brings me to my cup
of coiTee md my retrospect of the j
Sturgis murder.
It was darK when I left the restau- !
rant or nearly so, but still light
enough for me to see a woman in
black advancing to speak to me as 1 :
walked homeward.
"You aie Lawyer H ?" she said. ,
"1 have something to say to you."
"My good woman," I answered fiet
fu'ly, "l cannot be stopped upon the
street to attend to business. If you i
wish to see me you can do so to-mor
row at my room in the Court House."
"I must see you to night," she re
plied. Her voice was low, and she
: seemed to suffer from fatigue as she
spoko. "Can you not give me a mo
ment at your house?"
"Not a moment," 1 said firmly, j
"I need rest and must not be dis- j
ttirbed. Good-night, madam, and I
walked on.
1 went home to my dinner alone—l
was a bachelor then—and Jay down
(in a lounge in my private otlice for
tne rest 1 sorely needed. In a few
moments 1 lost consciousness and be- 1
gan to dream. 1 thought a bird was
; flying alout, me; that I caught it and
thrust it from the window, which I
closed, that it began tapping on the
pane with its bill in a regular succes
sion of raps that sounded now near,
now far. It annoyed me enough to
waken me, and there were the raps
continued, on the window and door,
and all around me. I started to my
feet with a distin t sensation of fear,
and for a moment expected to see my
dream-bird flying towards me Then
a hesitating knock on the panels of (
the street door gave me a sense of re
lief. Here was something tangible:
the rest 1 had dreamed. 1 opened
the door and saw the woman who
1 had accosted me on the street.
"Ueally, madam." I began, when
she held up her hand to invoke si- 1
lence.
"Hush: I come to you on a matter
of life and death. You must hear
me." and she quietly entered the
room before I could close the door,
it instantly occurred to me that this
, woman knew something about the
murder of old Solomon Sturgis.
"I must hasten —I have only a mo- ;
ment," she said. "I came here to ,
tell you that Warren Sturgis is not a
murderer. He is innocent of the deed
of which he is accused."
"Your proof, madam." I answered;
"proof is what we need, not asser
tions of bis innocence."
"You shall have ample proof," she I
>aid slow y, "you have only to go to
the home of Clifford Sturgis and i
order him to produce his brother
Solomon, and you will have the
proof."
"What do you mean?'-
"That Solomon Sturgis is not dead,
but held a prisoner i»»• the house of
his brother,"
"Then who was the dead man?"
"That I do not know; but I have
no time to talk further. What I tell
you is true Open the door and let*
me pass."
Her voice became so laint, it was it
mere breath. As I stepped forward
to open the door at her whispered
but imperative command, 1 said:
•'lf this story is true, it is of the I
greatest importance, and I must see
voti again immediately. Who are
you?"
"I am Warren Stuigis' mother." 1
And then I do not know what hip
pened. It was as if someone had
struck me a violent blow. Lights
flashed before my eyes: there was a
roar of surging waters la uiy ears: 
ITIOVE ALL THINGS, AND HOLD FAST TO THAT WHICH IS GOOD
the door had not opened, yet I waa
in the room with these words beat ng
at my conscience: "I am Warren
Sturgis' mother."
Then followed a peaceful blank.
My man found me lying there insen
sible and opened the door to give me
air. He had seen no woman although
he had remarked on hearing voces
in my orticc. I dismis.-ed him and
went to bed, declaring that I was
overworked, and had in consequence
a fainting fit. Hut to myself the
whole thing was an awful mystery.
The singular behavior of that strange
woman: my dream which nad pie
ceded her coming, her remarkable
- story, and the manner of her
leaving—was it all a part of my
dream? And ruoie strange, more
fearful still, the disclosure of her
, identity. For this woman, whom I
i seemed to have known was the coun
terpart of her whom she declared
herself to be, a d I know for a cer
tainty that the mother of Warren
Sturgis has lain in her grave for six
or eight years. If 1 had been talking
with her, 1 had held speech with a
dead woman. I tossed and turned
I until midnight, then I routed up my
man, bade him harness a swift horse
to a light wagon, and soon we were
speeding over the road in the direc
tion ot Grand La Tour. It seemed a
long time before I stopped the flying
horse at the farm gate, and was
wrapping at the front door of the
one-story ot.tage, where a singlf
light burned dimly.
"What's wanted?" asked a trem
filing voice—the voice of Clifford Stur
gis liiniseif. I told him who I was
and to my surprise he readily opened
the door, and listened to what I had
to say. It was very brief. I ordered
him as one in authority, and whose
information;could not be disputed,
to pioduce the living man, Solomon
Sturgis, He only asked one question:
"How did you know he was here?"
"A woman told rue," I answered
with a solemn voice and manner.
"Oh, then you have seen her?" h
said, and with that he took up thf
light in his trembling hand, and led
! the way to a room in a d stant wing
of the cottage. It was a good hiding
place, dust and cobwebs everywhere,
and among them in a small closet
like room, but comfortable enough ir.
other respects, lay Solomon Sturgis,
raging like a madman. Clifford
Sturgis, as we soon found out: had
abduct d his brother, and substituted
the body of a dead pauper, which he
had dressed in his relative's clothes,
in order to secure the payment of an
"YOU SHALL HAVE AMPLE PROOF,"
SHE SAID.
| insurance policy which he had helc
for many years on the old man's life.
He became tired of keeping the as
sessments paid and with the help of
a stronger mind had evolved the plan
of abduction and apparent murder.
Hut it had never oc urred to him
i that Warren miiht 1 e accused of put
ting his uncle out of the way. He
found himself caught in a network ol
crime, and it is doubtful if he would
ever have confessed his part in the
matter if the boy had been convicted.
There was a sensation, you may be
j sure, when Solomon Sturgis was led
into the Dixon Court House, and
every one received him as one raised
from the dead. There was no one to
call Clifford Sturgis to account, save
his outraged relatives, and he left
that part of the country unmolested,
and was heard of no more.
Warren continued to live with bi&
uncle, and when he married h a fa th
lul sweetheart they maue their home
there. The old man is dead now,
and his strange story almost forgot
ten, but 1 ask myself, twenty-five
years after the event, who was the
woman who came to me bearing the
form and features of one long dead?
Was she a part of my dream, and if
so, whence came the dream that
saved a man's life? And had I
dreamed of seeing her on my way
home, as well?— Mrs. M. L. Kayne ic
I'tica Globe.
=
Diplomatic Knglfsh.
Most of the diplomats who are sent
to Washington soon acquire some Fn
glisli. It is of different grades, how
ever, and usually adapted specially tc
the work to which the diplomat is tc
be assigned. The socially inclined
' soon acquire the art of telling a g.rl
she is good looking, and are able tc
i discuse the weather. Others remain
for years a:.d hardly go outside of the
province of diplomatic politics in
their English. This was demon
, strated by a story Mine. Lazo Arriaga,
of the Guatemalan legation, tells ot
her husband, the Minister from that
country. She speaks perfect English,
having lived for seven years in an
American couventschool. Altho gh
the Minister himseir only began to
study our language four months ago.
he will talk politics in English foi
hours without his companions sus
pecting that he has had only foui
months' exper.ence in thetongue:but
a few days ago he had an eug igement
w.th the dentist. At the last mo
ment he turned back to his wife, anc
in a tone of despair announced. • Yot
must go with me. I don't know any
thing about the American dictionary
on teeth." and Madame had to go tc
ta'.k teeth.— Kate Field Washington.
"WHAT caused your bookkeejjer'f
downfall'" "Lost his balance."
INEBKIETY AND ( RIMT.
I-ord Chief Justice Hsl«*. of Euglanl. TT.I.
perhaps the flr*t to call attention to inebriety
as a cause of crime, requiring special study
i and attention. Iu 1870 he is reporte 1 as
saying, "If the murders an 1 manslaughters.
; the btirglarifs an I robberies, the rio:s and
| tumults and other enormities committed dur
ing the last twenty years were divided into
five parts, four of them would be found to
have been the issue and product of drink
:ug'"
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I of room for a lew more worl.i i-. and w« nryf
' them to begin at onee. If you are ahead' 'in
j ployed, hut have a few spare nionu ats.au i wisl
I to use them to advantage, then wri  u- ;.t jn-'»
(for this is vour grand opportunity . an I rvc»*i
! full particulars l.v return mail. Ad ires.,
XKLK & CO., Box So. Wit
f^lTCofMHiSictas
L 3 n CAN be CURED,
a fl We v.- !I SEVD FREE
1 M mail :i laf;* TIIIAL BOTTLE;
kJ a! c % a. tr*.*:t.sc on Erilcpsy. DON'T
J SUFFER ANY LONGERf Gir- Post Of.
• l;cc, wS-.:e snJ Ccunly, aad Are p'*in!y.
Alerts, "pur yjflt.j. CI
i - 'm-i ,n- A -•X': i.-j >]-■ , T> v
pmm extmots !
♦ 1 of
iDK.WM. A. HAMMOND,?
i In 1, a!»oratory at Wa»!iinj;ton. O. C. ♦
♦ CEIRBIIXE, fmm bra r dis-♦
♦ eases ▼
+ LUXE. ♦
A lis ■ ♦
A etc. A
T  (KI)IM . A
J of HIP heart X
J TESTIXE. T
♦ J
♦ lli . z
♦ OVIKISE, - ♦
j a Of the 0\ ;iT :r-s A
4 Sll'Wl LIXK. :t> r>;i.i. *'
j l» H, Fi • ir«p>. riH itoksi . U.ii. J
J The | s 2
T s;. n.e - ' t «*r»-H|-«ne if- • X
X the i 1
♦ ten T
♦ • J
♦ of
A peristal i •
a la Buncultr i ♦
X erssse* . ♦
J and i a
T *
X with tl Extracts tbey T
♦m. ■ ' •' T
♦ " z
♦ by ♦
♦ xrit: tt)V. '!EIA  HEJ3U II- t v.. *
V/jta>ilnc!on. If. C. »
SI.OO Per Year In Advance
for Infants and ChiSdren.
— 1 ■ " ™ '' 1
MOTHE K&, Do You Kr>o¥¥ t tm: I'sn'Roric,
Bateman's I'rop*. Godfrey's Cordial, many so-ealled Soothing Syrups, and
inost remedies for children are composed of opium or morphine ?
Do You Know that opiuiuend morphine an* stupefying narcotic ]>oisons ?
Do Yon Know that i'i most Cuuutrica druggists are n : ivrmitted to sell narcotics
without labeling them po ; »ons ?
Do Yon Know that you should no: pern.:; any medicine to U- given your child
unless you or your physician know of what it i;. composed
Do Yon Know that Castoria i a purely vegetable preparation. :md tliat a lift of
its ingredients is published with every bottle ?
Do You Know that Catoria is the prescription of the famous Pr Samuel Pitcher
That it has been in use for nearly thirty years, and that more Castoria is now sold than
of all other remedies for children combined ?
Do You Know that the Patent Office Department of the United States, and of
other countries, have issued exclusive right to l>r. Pitcher and his assigns to use the word
" Castoria " and its formula, and that to imitate them is a state prison offense »
Do You Know that one of the reasons for granting this government protection was
because Castoria hail l>een proven to lie absolutely
Do Yon Know that 35 average doses of Castoria are furnished for IL r »
cents, or one ceut a dose ?
Do You Know that when possessed of this jierfect preparation, your children may
be kept well, and chat you may have unbroken rest ?
Well, these things are worth knowing. They are facts.
The fac-simile " i» on every
signature of wrapper.
Children Cry for Pitcher's Castoria.
W. L DOUGLAS
Co CUAC fon
M M %\TI! GENTLEMEN.
rB jBF-jlSSfc $5, $4 and 53.50 Dress Shoe,
clfc \P a! - 53.50 Police Shoe, 3 Solos.
ttmi $2.50, S2for Workingmen.
j $2 and $1.75 for Boys.
LADIES AND MISSES,
83, $2.50 $2, $1,75
& CAUTION.—If any dealer
®|| ofTerii you W. 1.. f> >ukl»k
®p-_ - \ hlioch at a reduced price,
F THIS IS THE
m "O* the bottom, put him
Wr L. DOUCLAS ws arc stvlish, easy fitting, and give better
satisfaction'at the prices advertised than any other make. Try one pair and he con
vinced. The stamping of W. L. Douglas* name and price on the bottom, which
guarantees their value, saves thousands of dollars annually to those who wear them.
Dealers who push the sale of VV. L. Douglas Shoes gain customers, which helps :o
i increase the sales on their full line of goods. They can afford to sell at a le«» profit,
and wc believe you can save money by buying all your footwear of tli«* dealer adver*
tUe«l below. Catalogue free upou application. AY. L. DOUGLAS, Brockton, Mum.
FLKMIXO & CO. I)I' NN. N C.
F. M. MCKAY, JSCMMKKVJLLK, N C
YOU OAK HOLD TB^PT
ffjgi "Triumph"
t SAFETY-BIT.
The manufacturer of the TRIUMPH issues an
insurance Policy
flu nifying the purchaser to the amount of 850
9) when loss is occasioned by the driver's in-
W ability to hold the horse driven with
"3PKSE I 6s^^&gjnri WPH" EXT.
T! -I: ' i. HUMANE in it operation, and only made powerful at will of the driver.
Th-siui ; ! ! i't:der t£-L'. Hie situation, and the VICIOUS horse becomes DOCILE;
t! I'XJLIjEII a PLEASANT DRIVER. Elderly people will find driving with
this Eit a pleasure.
Br-i R J r«-T thl; l:it with the many malleable iron bit.-i now being
O KOI KiOBTCIina f> , ~ tha brr of tho • • Tr ;umpli"' is WROUGHT I
i OTECL, r -' 'll oa ;'hi r • sf,- to jiut in the t:.-iUth of a liors
j V"LL BE SSINT. POST AG£ PAID, AS FOLLOWS: NICKII'PLATE. $ 2.00 I
WKI. VRSi ARSQALE, ftac-r.e, Wisconsin.' _j
V.TT*?-'.Stl ' .r J- -J Tt-zjam .L-T -jw-K«| .I ■* ".'mrgig-. in
Medal and IHploina awarded at World"s Columbian Exposition . to I > R». h. W . SMITH.
I'l .napnl of this College, for System of Book-keeping and (]c>irrjl Musiness hduiation. Students
: m attendance the past year from 25 States. io.ooo former pupils, in business, etc. 13 teacher,
' employed. jJS~ttvmineHH Course « on >:
, J Commercial Law, MStrckanAisimg, J»imt St~.k. .1 f nwf i.'urwLectures, fiuunc ■
' i Practice, Mercantile Cor res/ -iJe/.c. etc. . Cost oJ' Full Uuslnesii Courw, inuuf..r.i(
J I Tuition, Stationery and Hoard in . nice lam s'*o. ,•" shorthand, 1 ypr
' writing and Telegraphy, are specialties, hi . .:>% -.i 1 .her- m 1 room; and' in
> be taken alone or with the Business  .->u:s". No charge has ever be n ■ ide fof pcocanag jitua
* Hon .No Vacation. Enter umv. ior Circular addre
! lltt.ltVß 11. SMITH. l*resldent. Lejlngton. hy.
>
► _
>
: fIARCEST**»#OJr Co/fPL&rSDGCr/ACTORY wfMTH W/VTZfQ*
|
► Our goods a*£ the Best
► Our Prices x r»e lowest figo .feOuJ
/*/M?l7apofoj J v 1
NO. U-
ADVERTISING
IS TO
BUSINESS
-WHAT STEAM IS TO
MACHINERY,
THAT GREAT I'ROPELI.INO POWER
00000000000000000  >0000000001)00000
« rite up a nice advertisement al>«>ut
your business and insert it in
THE CENTRAL TIMES
and you'll "see a change in business
all around."
    

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