North Carolina Newspapers

    J. W. HONEYCDTT
DIES IN GEORGIA
Rutherford County Man Taken
Suddenly 111 and Dies on
Way to Florida
J
' Forest City, R-2, Nov. 6. J. W.
Honeycutt, of near here, died Friday
morning in Augusta, Ga., while on
his way to Florida. Mr. Honeycutt,
who was 49 years of age, was taken
suddenly ill at a filling station near
Augusta, Ga., and died within. a
few minutes after he was taken sick.
He is survived by his widow, Mrs.
Ollie Honeycutt, two sons, Jessie and
Pink Honeycutt and two daughters,
Geneva and Eliza Honeycutt.
Hise body was returned to his
home and funeral services were held
Sunday afternoon at 2 p. m. at
Floyds Creek church. Rev. W. B.
Jenkins, of Woodruff, S. C., and
Rev. A. C. Wilson, pastor of Floyds
Creek church, were in charge of the
funeral services.
Pallbearers were Messrs. E. J. Ed
wards, J. W. Green, W. F. Green, M.
G. White, J. H. Henson, Gordon Wall.
PALACE BARBER SHOP
NOW IN NEW QUARTERS
The Palace Barber Shop is now located in new
quarters, next door to The Courier office, and
ly invite their friends to call and see them in their new
location. Everything new and up-to-date.
First Class Workmen to Serve You
The Best in Tonsorial Work
We are specially fitted to take care of the ladies'
trade in our new quarters. Give us a call.
Palace Barber Shop
C. W. Harris, Proprietor
Forest City, N. C.
Our New Chevrolets
are selling so fast that we are forced to
close out all used cars we have in stock to
make room for new cars.
Used Automobiles At
AUCTION
ON EASY TERMS
Forest City, N. C.
V
AT OUR GARAGE
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER Bth
AT 7:30 P. M.
All cars are in good condition and are ready to drive.
All makes and models.
, Sedans, Coupes, Coaches, Roadsters and
Touring
See These Cars before the Sale at Our' Garage. Sale
Starts Promptly at 7:30 P. M. Thursday, November
Sth. New Chevrolets on display in our show room.
Model Chevrolet Company
Chevrolet Dealers Forest City, N. C.
| Honorary pallbearers were Messrs. F.
1 E. White, D. E. White, P. G. Toms,
JJ. F. Wall, J. H. Sorgee, J. M. Mau
! ney, J. W. Bridges, J. C. Powell. The
'! flower bearers were Misses Pauline
I White, Estelle White, Louise Padgett,
j.Edith Holland, Lucile Manning, Irene
| Scruggs, Eloise Sorgee, Ethel White,
, Louvenia Honeycutt, Jettie Rayburn,
jand Mrs. J. F. Wall.
1
I
MRS. E. HORTON DIES
AT CHEROKEE, S. C.
Mrs. E. Horton, aged about 78
years, of near Cherokee, S. C., died
Sunday afternoon after a lengthy ill
ness of paralysis. Funeral services
1 were held at Cherokee Church Mon-
I day at 2 p. m. She is survived by
a husband and two daughters. She
I was an aunt of Mrs. C. H. Wilson, of
1 Avondale.
j __
j CARD OF THANKS
We wish to thank our many friends
for the kindness shown us during
I the death of our husband and father.
I Also for the many beautiful flowers,
j May God's richest blessings rest up
i on you all.
! Mrs. J. W. Honeycutt and children.
THE FOREST CITY COURIER, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1928
R. G. CHERRY TO
ADDRESS WORLD
WAR VETERANS
Banquet for Fx-Service Men
I To Be Held Saturday Ev
ening At Iso-Thermal
Hotel
1
Rutherfordton, Nov. 6.—Mr. R. G.
Cherry, state commander of the
American Legion, of Gastonia, will
be the principal speaker at the ban
quet for ex-service men at the Iso
; Thermal Hotel Saturday evening, No
vember 10, at 7:30.
The Fred Williams Post, No. 75,
i American Legion, of Rutherfordton,
!is sponsoring the banquet. An at
j tempt is being made to get out as
I many ex-service men of the county
' as possible for this banquet. All ex
service men are urged to attend, re
i gardless of whether they received a
| letter or not. The committee in
j charge is sending out letters to as
] many of the men as are known, but
I since they do not have a complete
j list of all men of the county who
• served in the war, and their address
es, it is impossible to notify all of
them. The enly condition attached is
each man who wishes to attend is
j requested to notify the Iso-Thermal
| hotel or R. E. Price, Rutherfordton,
| not later than Friday so that the ho
! Tel may have a sufficient number of
plates provided for the banquet,
i Plates will be seventy-five cents
each.
. A regular program will be put on
in addition to the speaking and the
banquet.
I
WHY COUNTRY BOYS WIN
.
Despite the great increase in city
population in recent decades, country
i boys, that is boys raised on farms or
j in small towns, still seem to capture
their share of the professional world.
The two richest men in America,
Ford and Rockefeller, both* were
country boys, and so likewise was
ithe world's greatest inventor, Edison.
The president is a farm boy, and
numerous instances could be cited to
show that outstanding leaders in bus
iness, politics and the professions in
this country were recruited from the
rural districts. This, in spite of the
fact that within the past 50 years
jthe rural population, or those people
i living on farms and in towns, has
j shrunken from about 75 per cent
| to less than 50 per cent of the total
j population.
j There are probably many good
j reasons why the country boys take
.high places. Perhaps one reason is
that the country boy usually arrives
iin a big city without friends or in
fluence, with limited cash, but with
a fine determination to make good
and show the folks back home what
he can do. City boys, on the other
hand, often have relatives and
friends through whose influence they
get a "comfortable berth" to start
off with, and they gradually settle
down to the business routine of a
big corporation, enjoy the numerous
diversions of a big city where they
are thoroughly at home, and where
the demands on their spare time are
so heavy that it takes a Spartan de-
Labor Head Asks
Nation's Workers to
Support Red Cross
William Green, president of the
American Federation of Labor, in
Washington, calls upon the workers
of the nation to support the twelfth
annual roll call of the American
Red Cross, November 11-29, in the
following statement:
"Through the American Red
Cross we find expression for some
of our noblest ideals. It is an ef
fective instrument for magnifying
many times our personal service
to humanity.
"In the face of great disasters,
when the injured and homeless run
into the thousands, there is little
we can do individually. Consolidat
, ing our strength through member
ship in this great organization, our
opportunity for service is unlim
ited.
We must not forget that every
day is a day of disaster to thou
sands. Into homes where disaster
strikes your Red Cross goes in your
name to be friend and counselor to
those ufcon whom misfortune has
laid her heavy hand.
"As President of the American
Federation of Labor, I hope and
feel confident that the workers of
the nation will respond to the Red
Cross Roll Call and have a part in
this organizations great work."
(Signed)
WILLIAM GREEN,
President
American Federation of Labor.
termination to study insteady of
play after working hours.
. The country boy, determined to
show his folks and friends that he
can make good in the big town,
"saws wood"; his superiors notice the
difference -between his attitude and
that of those who are satisfied with
a comfortable, wellpaying job, and
the result is that they advance the
"hayseed" to more important posi
tions when the opportunity offers.
OAK GROVE NEWS
Bostic, R-3, Nov. s.—We are glad
to have Rev. J. E. Hipp back with
us at Oak Grove for another year.
Rev. C. F. Tate preached for us Sun
day morning. He preached an inter
esting sermon to a large congrega
tion. We had several visitors present.
We invite them to come and be with
us again. _
Misses Edith Biggerstaff and Lu
cile Webb spent the week end in
Cliffside at the home of Mrs. Car
rie Hardin.
Rev. C. F. Tate and family of near
Asheville spent the week end at the
home .of his father, Rev. Tate has
been moved from the Asheville dis
trict to Stokesdale in the Greensbo
ro district.
Mr. and Mrs. Edney Greene and
Miss Victoria Jones of the Walls sec
tion spent Sunday at Mr. W. P.
Tate's.
Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Randall and
children Robert and Marjorie of
Alexander spent the week end at the
home of his father, Mr. A. G. Ran
dall.
Mrs. R. L. Magness spent Sunday
with her daughter Mrs. Cletus Walk
er near Lattimore.
Mrs. Carrie Hardin of Cliffside
spent Friday night with her daugh
ter, Mrs. J. R. Biggerstaff.
Miss Ollierea Randall spent one
night last week with Misses Maude
and Pauline Harrill.
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Lindsay of
Caroleen spent the week end at Mr.
George Green's.
Mrs. J. M. Randall and daughter,
spent Saturday night at Mr. Howard
Harrill's.
Mrs. Charles Lowery of near Shel
by spent the week end at the home
of her son, Mr. L. B. Lowery.
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Harrill spent
the week end at Mr. W. T. Blanton's.
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Harrill were
shopping in Shelby Friday.
Mrs. Delia Randall spent the night
last week with Mrs. C. B. Harrill.
Mr. and Mrs. Wyth Bridges and
children spent the week end at Mr.
A. B. Bailey's.
Mr. and Mrs. L. D. Wilkie and
Miss Belle Wilkie spent Thursday
night at Mrs. J. M. Randall's.
Mrs. J. M. Biggerstaff spent one
night last week at Mr. J. T. Bridges'
near Sharon.
Miss Clara Randall is sick at this
writing.
Mr. and Mrs. L. D. Wilkie and
Miss Belle Wilkie were visitors at
Mrs. J. M. Brooks' Sunday..
Mr. A. G. Randall and family were
visitors at Mr. C. B. Harrill's Friday.
Miss Eugenia Randall was the
dinner guest of Miss Vallerea Bigger
staff Sunday.
Those visiting Mr. L. D. Wilkie's
Sunday night were, Mr. W. P. Tate,
Mr. J. P. Randall and family, Mrs.
J. M. Randall, Messrs. Cletus and
Grady Randall and Miss Ollierea
Randall.
Messrs. Cletus and Grady Randall,
Alton and Olan Kendrick and Misses
Leigh, Maude and Pauline Harrill,
Eugenia and Pearle Randall all at
tended the Halloween party at Mrs.
Delia Thompson's of the Concord
community, Saturday night.
Mr. Tom Harrill and family of the
Oakland community were visitors at
Mr. J. C. Randall's Sunday after
noon.
Miss Leigh Harrill of Rutherford
ton spent the week end with home
folks.
Mrs. J. M. K. Randall spent last
week end in Forest City with rela
tives.
Miss Gladys Randall spent a few
days last week at Mr. J. P. Randall's
of near Caroleen.
Those visiting Mr. J. C. Randall's
Friday night were Mrs. R. H. Big-;
gerstaff and children, Messrs. Alton j
and Olan Kendrick and Miss Bertie
Lee Kendrick.
» ]
Mr. Eller—"Where are you going,
Will?"
Will—"l'se leavin' town, Mr. Ben.
Jes received a unanimous letter from
dem Ku Kluxers."
Mr. Eller—"You mean an anony
mous letter, don't you?"
Will—"Naw suh, I mean unani
mous. De Klan tole me to leave. 7
says I'se goin' So dat makes it unan- i
imous. I
Hightower & Matheny
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
North Henrietta, N. C.
A funeral conducted by Hightower and Matheny gives the tone
and dignity which can only be had from funeral directors of effi
ciency and high integrity. Ambulance service day and night.
Day 92 Telephone /. Night 68
General Clearance Sale! J
SALE STARTS TODAY AND WILL j
CONTINUE UNTIL NOVEMBER 17TH
FREE FREE
SATURDAY
November 10th
1:30 P. M.
We will throw away 50 Packages from the roof of our
store consisting of Merchandise, Shoes, Underwear,
Coats. Come one and all.
Men's Overall Jumpers
25 EACH
Big lot of Ladies' up-to-date high class Slippers. Regu
lar value $6.00 to SIO.OO. Sale price—
slr.9s PR. UP
Men's Suits
One lot of Men's Suits, new styles and shades. Values
up to $25.00, will go at—
57.95 suit
Special Attention To Shoe Repairing
Rutherford Shoe Hospital
Main Street - - Rutherfordton, N. C.
November Appetites f
• i
November appetites are lusty g
. . . cool weather puts an edge §
§illiok on the famil y' s P alate .. . plan
§( serve delightful meals made Ci
If up of these choice foods.
AND REMEMBER . . . this I
preciable saving on every pur- -j
j?
I
I QUAKER MAID |
| BEANS 3 ":.L 25' j
3
White House Milk, 3 tall cans 25c C;
I AUNT JEMIMA g
FLOUR £." P1 ,.14 c |
Fancy Pumpkin, large can 12 l-2c §
i
Quaker Maid Large Moist
COCOA COCOANUTS
'• N
|ri
1-2 lb. can 10° 3 for ....... 25° J
Red Kidney Beans, No. 2 can 10c
IA&P FAMILY OR SELF RISING
FLOOR
j h' j
Best Granulated Sugar, lb 6c
BOKAR
COFFEE , b . 47' j j
Campbell's Tomato Soup, 3 cans 25c
i
L
&*AiuitiK PAUWC'H l
~ ' ' ' ' ft
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