North Carolina Newspapers

    SK?TJB
H'K A
' J L. P ! SI V Jg II
VOL. XXIX.
' "JIW""!J-' - i in in. inn .. i TS, '
M - -
RALEIGH
EDITORIAL BRIEFS) WU1
J Ex-Kev. Bob Glenn may form
a party to run hJra for the Sea-
;;:; many Hall still run a New
y .rk Ik moeracy, but it cant ran this
Many Changes Made In tin? Railway
3IJMI Service.
31.
, N C. THURSDAY. APRIL 6, I9II.
TIIE EXTRA SESSIOIJ
No. 10
-woeja.eera to !&ikai a to.;
phesidhits ssr.aiisttiit
uaunpuuk trie Fint Demo-fi " J tx ta usiih Wh fe4 : rutk i?7ni
ima to. : fee coaidr4 try the "
N.w that the Democrats have Con
they can't decide what to do
a
it.
1 1
s'-eras that he "Progressive
l-r:;orata" are after Senator Over-
Governor Kit chin Is now a "Red
Simmons can now look out
Indian war dance.
for the
borne of the politicians say that
Kimraons is now a good Republican.
Well, hardly a good Republican.
Th Democratic officials have In
enised expenses and now you may
oxpect them to increase your taxes.
era tic Speaker in
Sixteen Years.
MMfN unionmr leader
I tpec-ii
Deiaocrtle Jlosw dir &ot tatted'
t fcsseadseats 'to any. of the railroad
Irate regulation law foraerty jhj!
Wa&hlngton, D. C March
Drastic action wat tkn to-clglit by!
Postmaster-Genera! Hitchcock in f-J
feeling a re-organization of the rail-s
way mail terrice. a round dozen of j
change of th most important offl-j
cers In the senric Wf re made by Mr.j
Hitchcock as a result of a long and
consideration. The most imoortanr The TentaUre IToOTm Ontlitw hr V11 Uwi oa ubjeu a:
' 2 w - - , r 1 V IMaMmI Aia a. . A M. I
3 MravMrsi aiiu yii ail oi tar
1 democrats lkKsi Xot Iclcidc
ol Cosfresj Yesterdiy
at Iloon
t?k' f -II-4t t
,an tt&tjt ilia
mm4 Viiuuxu if rirr.
I y$t a4 nl f If 8
bf RepaUicaa Coarrwarfi, or to
b llepuMieaa aaU-tnuti law, in thii! A
uemocrmti 4&ott&c4 Use
VEIIY SHOnT UESSAGE
I that the
But If they succeed In closing up
all the blind tigers, how will the
Democrats run their next campaign?
Rven if they form a Progressive
Democratic party they will probably
have to label It so you will know it.
It is to be presumed that ex-Speak
er Justice will not help the Demo
cratic party fight any more sham bat
ties.
The Raleigh Times says Washing
ton is full of Democrats hunting pie.
Thought the Democrats , were not pie-hunters!
Candidate Locke Craig is probably
losing sleep trying to decide which
one of the forty-seven varieties to
line up with.
When they have to force a Demo
crat to run for an office you may
know he thinks there is no chance
whatever for his election.
"Progressive Demo
may have to , force
6ome of the
crats" say they
Mr. Aycock to run for the Senate.
Well, that would be too bad.
change is that of Theodore IngalU, of!
Kentucky, superintendent of the di
vision of rural mails, who was .ap
pointed general superintendent of the
railway mail service in succession to
Alexander Grant, who was demoted to
St. Paul, Minn., as a division superin
tendent. Other changes were divis
ional. The affairs of the railway mail ser
vice were overhauled thoroughly by
Mr Hitchcock personally and the out
come is the most sweeping change
ever made in the history of the rail
way mail service.
While signing the necessary orders?
to-night for the changes, Mr. Hitch
cock said:
"The railway mail service has suf
fered greatly from poor management
and lack of supervision. In certain
of the divisions it was found that the
chief clerks had not been inspecting
their lines as was their, duty. Some
of the routes had received no Inspec
tion for several years. Instruction
from the department indicating im
provements as for example the prop
er consolidation or, mall matter and
the conservation of equipment re
ceived only perfunctory attention.
There has been a lack of co-operation
also in carrying into effect certain re
forms which I had indicated, and U
was made evident by the inquiry that
no proper spirit of co-ordination with
the department existed in the railway
mail service."
The necessary transfers will be
made as quickly as possible.
the
Any Amcndmcnu to Railroad Rate
Regulation Laws, or to the 'An ti
Trost Law, Which the Democrat
Thought Were so Important Before
tho Election Ways and Means
committee Announces Committee
Appointments A Hot Democratic
Fight in the Senate,
(Special to The Caucasian.)
Washington. D. C, April 4; 1911.
The opening to-day of the Sixty
second Congress, called into extraor
dinary session by President Taft, was
not marked by any unusual incidents.
President Taft did not send in his
message to Congress. It is under
stood, however, that the message of
the President will be short and con
lined entirely to reciprocity with Canada.
refulatioa of the railroads that hasj
een had in this country and ai! l
lb prosecution f trust that feasj
ver occurred since the foundation J
ot the government have bea under J
the laws enacted by, Republican Con-j
gressmen. j
Xoth Carolina Fares Well on Com.?
mJUeea,
limit 0!y l ith the Canadian !W mill , A4ut tmriary ?
It is also understood that the Presi
dent will call the attention of the
Democratic House to the fact that
a tariff board, authorized by Con
gress and appointed by him, is now
investigating the differences in the
cost of production here and abroad
as to each article covered by the tar
iff, and that that board will be able
to report on a number of important
schedules by the opening of the reg
ular session in December, and that
he will suggest that it would be wise
inot to act in the dark, but for the
rrr the Immediate Iasa of! WaiUsts. Anl 4 CrU
th imi-y th tX for f o XmTut uy J
meat U lnrely Ikooomie and Oo- Trmtssry, t&zk t- cta t& ct
mettte-Sbmimt Mem Ever Jaty Xhm -:!rtl4ftt tay.
'iTfce ta a 4ataUttil fey Ct
et to Any Opening o CVnrreaaf W. 11, Crook. vtras dUsralas fif-
Washlnnnn n n ' ?Cf ot lh l lmliat
. . . -. . . v. W- , -T r m
, idnt Taft twl.r n . Aarww rcrle
m? ayaana Means committee l iJZZ 7" ! asotst thoi tmzU
"Mtv" eiea oy a prior Ueiao- . , " -.- - jtc-jfoj fm 0 tvij
ap. 11. . . . ! C ration of !hn M nnvH ntrt ritw t 44
v.auc caucus, announced 1U liiU oZinmr 7 t -'rS'r ",,aJI'.M aaid tha Prlit td
va!t
committee chairmen and members of
the various committees. On this com
mittee Is Congressman Kitchln, of
North Carolina. It will be remem
bered that Congressman Pou was
formerly on this committee and
claimed the right to be continued on
it. Mr. Kitchin contested this right,
and after a -fight defeated Mr. Pou,
Or rather as a result of the fight Mr.
Pou withdrew from the contest, and
Mr. Kitchln was appointed.
! It was announced at the time that
Mr. Pou woud be given his choice of
some of the more important chair
manships. Soon,, following this 'an
nouncement, it was stated and pub
lished that 3Ir. Pou would be made
chairman of the Committee on the
District of Columbia. , In a fewr days
there was a denial of this announce
ment, Mr. Kitchln contending that!
no such agreement had
Canada. He urged the paaaaee of it.Ti
lions. The message was the aborted .. rVrtJt
ever seat by any President at the;
tary, leave the WhJta lieu to fet
ching of Congreaa. conUinlnToni; f?Il uaTf "
578 words. Reciprocity wa the only Xli T.Y
issue taken up by the President, L"0,. ?.f 18C!
The message wa sent to Congress " Af:tUal &rT of
immediately after it met at noon to1 "f alio took tha oath f
day and a ftef routine bualneas in the . ,IU iUCce"or
Senate had been dU posed of. the! T Ury iQ crJ Vtagh haa at
reading of the menage began Mlf ' .
Aa the Junior AaaUta&t Secretary
Tfe Mesage. j cf the Treasury, Mr. Railey will b
To the Senate and House of Repre-. SecreUrX. MwVeagVa right ha&d
senutives: . maQ ,a ?TcraI of the most Important
I transmitted to the Slity.first Con- of Treasury. H will
gress on January 267 last. t"e ten bV tmm1 of th.
of the reciprocal traie Wml .itftU9U
which had been negotiated u ,IffTinft,rrTlCn ftCl,0a Cf
direction by the SreJrV oi " ltrT
with th mnmcnuH 1 rrlce nd the secret service.
J. W. NAPIER AGAIN ON TRLAL.
This Time on tlie Charge of Substi
tuting Past Diamonds for Real
Ones, and for Using the United
States Mails to Defraud Jewelry
Firms, ,
Congress to wait for the report of
this commission giving the facts.
Champ Clark and His Speech to the
' House.
When Champ Clark, the new
Speakerthe first Democratic Speak-
t . . ...
0 . VS minion of Canada. Thr. a,r- ,a,,cJr wa lormeny a wata-
1 oeen made. .. " -".vv, in-ton t,.,, it
A little later there was a further an-! 7" lDe, c!fumalIon of earaesl work as a ncMenifr bor
riouncement bp Mr. Pou that he had I lrts' extnd,nK over a period of near- r a a mr W
began
ifot been forced off the committee on
ways and means, but had been retired
vrith an understanding that was sat
isfactory to him.
Pou and Godwin Get Chairmanships.
I It now , turns out that Mr. Pou is
well provided for. He is made chair
man of the committee on claims, and
13 also made a member of the im-
f ortant committee on rules.
Major Gaynor is now defending
the New York police force. The
mayor is certainly taking a heavy re
sponsibility on his shoulders.
The tax assessor is now abroad in
the land and you will probably be
surprised next fall to learn that your
Property has increased so in value.
The Statesville Landmark thinks
the present system of municipal gov
ernment a failure. And, how, about
the State government as now administered.
At least the farmers who voted
for low prices for their products will
geit what they voted for if this Demo
cratic Congress gives the country
free trade.
Some of the food chemists have
decided that pie is indigestible and
a menace to the population. It will
take stronger evidence than this to
break the Democrats. -
Bx-Speaker Justice says he is tired
being misrepresented by office-
jaolders and of fighting sham battles.
-CUm " .
un Mr. Justice took part In just
cn a camDaifim last fall.
The disappointed democratic of-
Sce-seekers now in Washington might
3oin the army and proceed to the
texican border if they -wish to show
their patriotism and lof for their
tountrj.
The News and Observer does not
ike some of the juries that have been
Administering justice in Wake Coun
If ths Wake County juries will
Persist in rendering decisions with
out first consulting the wishes of 'the
pws and Observer, then they may
yxpect to suffer the consequences.
A Massachusetts professor has dis-
r rea a way ; to photograph
faoughts and predicts surprising usei
Jilness for , his new invention. No
ubt there will be many surprises
ti 6 k TeJ0T th0SG usinS the machine,
jt by the time it causes a few mur
ers and Several divorces it will
fo&ably be debarred from further
iulness.
Charlotte, N. C., April 4. J. W.
Napier is on trial here today in the
Federal Court. It is charged that
Napier did unlawfully and willfully
devise or intend to devise a scheme
or artifice to defraud the Southern
Express Company at Westville. S.
C, by opening a correspondence with
another person and did on or about
March 15 cause to be mailed a let
ter in a postoffice of the United
States at Charlotte, addressed to
Daniel Lowe & Co., Washington
Street, Salem, Mass.
The preliminary ' hearing of the
case .was conducted in Charlotte be
fore a United States Commissioner,
J. W. Cobb, on October 25, 1910.
It is seldom that a more interest
ing case than the one at hand is re
corded. Napier, it is -alleged, used
the name of James Parris in deal
ing.with Daniel Lowe & Co., of Low
ell, Mass., and another large jewelry
firm. From them he secured cata
logues, prices, etc., of handsome dia
monds at the same time securing
from imitation diamond houses of
Terre Haute, Ind., and other places,
catalogues of stones, weights, cuts
specifications and settings. Real
stones and imitation stones in simi
lar settings were then ordered. The
real stones were handled by the
Southern Express Company, C. O. D.,
after inspection and the imitation
paid for in advance.
Along with Napier, W. P. Duke
was included in the warrant, but
Duke turned State's evidence. The
two men used the name James Par
ris. After some comment Parris
passed the treasure to Napier, who
would make examinations under a
jeweler's magnifying glass. Napier
would substitute the imitation of ex
actly the same size and kind, jwith
identically fac simile of a tag at
tached. Some flimsy Teason was giv
en the expressman for not accept
ing the rings and the imitation was
placed in 'the box and returned.
At the same time' the charge of
fraudulently using the United tSates
mails was preferred against Napier,
he was also served with a warrant
charging that he and Charles Quar
ter had violated the Federal law re
lating to the white slave' traffic
The two men were tried at Greens
boro in January and released, Judge
Boyd holding that there was no vio
lation. Quaster left immediately for
the North, but arrived In Charlotte
Monday, to testify in this case. ;
B'ZZtr my other chairmanship which
with very enthusiastic applause. . On
Arrested for Using the. Mails to De-
: n: ' .' fraud.- :-- Y-:-7 ;-
' - :" t"- - :v- "a. .."
New Ybrk, April .4.- Postal inspec
tors today raided the offices of m.
G . Motley & Co., mining promoters,
at ,32 Broadway, seizing 15 bags of
mail and arrested Motley, who was
subsequently held . in $2,500 bail,
charged with fraudulent use of the
mails. - '
a formal roll-call Mr. Clark was
elected Speaker receiving the united
vote of the Democratic majority,
while the minority vote was cast sol
idly for Mr. James R. Mann, of Illi
nois, Speaker Cannon having declined
t be a candidate for the minority
Speakership.
Speaker Clark, in his speech ac
cepting the high office, outlined the
pledges which his party had made to
the people and the legislation which
he thought was necessary to keep
those pledges in good faith. The
key-note of his speech is summed up
in the following sentence: '
"We are this day put on trial,
and the duty devolves on us to
demonstrate, not so much by fine
phrases as by good worksj. that
we are worthy of the confidence
imposed in us by the voters of
the land, and that we are wor
thy of their wider confidence."
Among . the distinguished . Demo
crats who were present to see the
election and inauguration of the first
Democratic Speaker in sixteen years,
were William Jt Bryan, three times
the Democratic nominee for Presi
dent, and a possible candidate for a
fourth nomination, and Governor
Harmon of Ohio, who is 'being groom
ed by the conservative Democratic
eement for the Democratic nomina
tion.
The Democratic Program.
The House Democrats met in cau
cus on Saturday night to elect the
chairmen and members of the stand
ing committees of the House and to
outline the Democratic program of
the session.
This work had all been prepared
for the caucus by the Democratic
committee on ways and means, which
had been selected by a prior Demo
cratic caucus several months ago. The
program announced ta the caucus by
this committee provided 'for doing a
number of things besides considering
the Canadian reciprocity bill for
which the President called Congress
Into extra session.
The program includes the consld-
eration of
The election of United States Sen
ators by the peope ;
Legislation providing for, publicity
of campaign contributions before and
after elections;
; The re-apportionment of the House
on the basis of the last census;
, Investigation of the executive de
partments; v
The admission of Arizona and New
Mexico;
And some pop-gun revision of the
tariff, including the woolen and cot
ton schedules, and any other matters
that may be authorized by the Demo
cratic caucus.
This report . was unanimously
adopted by the Democratic caucus
the North Carolina delegation gets
goes to Mr Godwin, who is chairman
of the committee on civil service re
form. This is not an important com
mittee, but some surprise is express
ed that Mr." Godwin should pull off
even this small plum of a chairman
ship over the heads of the other
members of the State delegation. The
other members of the delegation,
however, are fairly well provided for
with membership on more or less im
portant committees as follows:
Mr. Webb .on judiciary; Mr. Page
on appropriation; Mr. Small pn riv
ers and harbors; Mr. Gudger on pub
lic buildings; Mr. Doughton on bank
ing and .currency; Mr. S ted man on
foreign affairs; and Mr. Faison on
merchant marines.
On the whole, since North Carolina
could not secure any more chairman
ships, the Democratic members can
not complain of the importance of the
committee assignments secured for
them by Mr. Kitchin.
A Hot Democratic Fight in the Sen
ate.
t While the Democrats in the House
seem so far to have adjusted their
differences in a more or less harmon
ious manner, yet there seems to be
serious trouble brewing at the other
end of the Capitol. There is a stiff
fight and line-up between what is
called the insurgent or progressive
Democratic Senators on the one side
and the conservative or Tory Demo
cratic Senators on" the other.
Bailey, of Texas, wanted to be the
leader of what is called the Tory
wing, but finding that there was no
hope for his election, that element, it
seems, compromised on Senator Mar
tin, of Virginia. The progressive
Democrats, however, have opposed
his election almost as strongly as the
election of Senator Bailey.
Today, the progressives claim that
they are in the majority and have
twenty-one votes, while the Tories
claim that they have twenty. The
list claimed by the progressives is as
follows:
Bryan, of Florida; Chamberlain,
of Oregon; Clarke, of Arkansas;
Culberson, of Texas ; Davis, of Ar
kansas J Gore, of Oklahoma; Hitch
cock, of Nebraska; Kern, of Indiana;
Lea, of Tennessee; Martine, of New
Jersey; Meyer, of Montana; New
lands, of Nevada; Owen, pt Oklaho
ma; Pommerine, of Ohio; Reed, of
Missouri; Shively, of Indiana; Stone,
of Missouri; Smith, of South Caro
lina; Terrell, of Georgia; Williams,
of Mississippi;. Rayner, of Maryland.
Those claimed by the Tories are as
follows: .
Bacon, of Georgia; Bailey, of Tex
as; Bankhead, of Alabama ; Chilton,
1 V .1 VPar ntl fhn nrt rf hnt K rnv.
ments to effect a trade arrangement,!
which, supplementing as it did thej
amicable settlement of various ques-1
tlona of a diplomatic and political
character that, had been reached,
would mutually promote commerce
and would strengthen the friendly
relations now existing. ,
The agreement In it Intent and in
its terms was purely economic and
commercial. While the general sub
ject was under discussion by the
commissioners, I felt assured that the
sentiment of the people of the Unit
ed States was such that they would
welcome a measure which would re
sult In the increase of trade on both
sides of the boundary ines. would
open up the reserve productive re
sources of Canada to the great mass
of our own consumers on advantag
tous conditions, and at the same time
offer a broader outlet for excess
products of our farms and many of
our industries. Details regarding
a negotiation of this kind necessarily
could not be made public while the
conferences were pending. When,
however, the full text of the agree
ment, with the accompanying corre
spondence and data explaining both
Its purposes and its scope, became
RlK Cotton Mill Merger In South
Carolina,
Columbia, a C. April 4. South
Carolina's third cotton mill merger
within a few week U now btlng
made, the Issuance of a commission
to-day to a $750,000 concern which
is to take over the Dillon group of
mills baring followed cioitly the
$10,000,000 Parker merger and the
$12,000,000 Smyth merger is the
Piedmont "Dillon Mills" Is the style
of the new Pee Dee corporation,
which Is to absorb. It is said, the
Maple mill and the Dillon mil! of
Dillon and the Hamer mill of 1 facer,
with, perhaps, certain agricultural,
cotton seed oil and mercantile prop
erties, and which may establish a
plant for the manufacture of carpet
and a fertilizer factory.
Ilrfre Right to Cut Rate cm Patent
Medicine.
Washington, April 3. The right
to "cut rates" in proprietary medi
cines In this country today received
the approval of the Supreme Court
of the United States. That tribunal
In an opinion by Justice Hughes, de-
known to the people through the! dared that to do otherwise It would
message transmitted to Congress. It
was immediately apparent that the
ripened fruits of the careful labors
of the commissioners met with wide
spread approval. This approval has
been strengthened by further consid
eration of the terms of the agree
ments in their particulars. The vol
ume of support which has developed
shows that its broadly national scope
is fully appreciated and Is responsive
t r Vi nnnnlaw will
" Resolution to Admit New Mexico and
Llfl8 "on5e 01 uepresentauves or Arizona to Statehood.
uie jsixiy-nrsx uongress, alter the
afford the manufacturer of medicine
an unlawful monopoly.
The question of the right of a man
ufacturer to control , the price of hi
article to the consumer arose in a
suit begun by the Dr. Miles Medical
Company, of Elkhart, Ind., against a
wholesale dealer In medicine la Cin
cinnati, O., John D. Park and Son
Company.
Ida; Foster, of Louisiana; Johnston,
of Alabama ; Johnson, of Minnesota ;
Martin, of Virginia; Overman, of
North Carolina: Pavnter. of Ken-
( Continued on Page. 5.)
ful text of the arrangement with all
the details in regard to the different
provisions had been before it; a they
were before the American neonle.
passed a bill confirming the agree
ment as negotiated and as transmit
ted to Congress.
This measure failed of action In
the Senate. In mr transmlttinr
message of the 26th of January, 1
fully set forth the character of the
agreement, and emphasized it ap
propriateness and necessity as a res
ponse to the mutual need of the
people of the two countries a well
as its common advantages. I bow
lay that message, and the reciprocal
trade agreement, as integrally part
of the present message, before the
Sixty-second Congress, and again In
vite earnest attention to the consid
erations therein expressed. -I
am constrained In deference to
popular sentiment and with a real
izing sense of my duty to the great
masses, of our people' whose welfare
is involved, to urge upon your con
sideration early action on this agree
ment. ' . -
In concluding the negotiations the
representatives of the two countries
bound themselves to use their utmost
efforts to bring ; about the tariff
changes provided for in the agree-
Washlngton, D. C, April 5.- -The
first fight between the administration
and the Senate insurgent to-day
when - a joint resolution by Senator
Norria Brown, of Nebraska, calling
for the approval of the constitution
adopted by the constitutional conven
tions of the territories or New Mexico
and Arizona and admission of those
territories as State of the Union was
Introduced In the Senate.
There I little opposition to the ad
mission of New Mexico as a State but
Arizona has proved to be obnoxious
to President Taft and many Republi
cans Ja the House and Senate.
of West Virginia; Fletcher, of Flor-fment J by concurrent legislation at
Washington and Ottawa. I have felt
it my duty, therefore, not to acqui
esce In regulation of action until the
opening of the Congress in December
but to ise my constitutional prerog-
Thlrteen Soldiers Seriously Injured
in a Trolley Accident.
San ; Antonio, April i 5. Thirteen
United States soldier' were hurt,
several of them perhaps fatally when
a street car In? which, they wer rid
ing turned over late last night. The
injured men were rushed to hospit
als and several of them .were able to
leave within a few hours. Others are
suffering from concussions and in
ternal injuries which may prove mor
tal. The trolley car left the rails,
turnlngover. .
Negro
Cavalry to Be Mo red.
Washington, Dl C, April 4. The
War Department announced " to-day
that the ninth negro cavalry because
of friction in San Antonio, would
soon be sent on patrol duty along the
Mexican border.
    

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