North Carolina Newspapers

    VOL X, No. 5.
SATURDAY MORNING, DECEMBER TWENTY-NINTH, 1906.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
LITERARY: BRILLIANTS
Sparkling Wit . and Hnmor Characterizes
Christmas Observance
Sly, Pokes at Penonul Peculiarities
Amuse and Entertain Holly
Inn. Guest.
t:
MIE Holly Inn Christ
mas tree takes its place
as one1 of the most novel
and entertaining affairs
ever enjoyed here. It is
doubtful if any thing, more
delightful has ever been
carried out anywhere and the idea of
having original verses accompany each
gift and these gifts -include everybody
in the hotel, was certainly unique.
The music room, used for the occasion,
was profusely decorated with holly and
mistletoe, a monster cedar tree, resplen
dent with colored incandescents, tinsel,
streamers, and presents being the central
feature. Santa Claus found a roomful
of people waiting to greet him on arrival
at eight-thirty, and for over an hour the
literary brilliants which fell from his
lips were eagerly gathered up and cher
ished. The gifts were, in most cases, toys
which combined with verses of sparkling
wit aud humor, to give sly pokes at per
sonal peculiarities, and there was just
enough of the Holiday sentiment inter
mingled to contrast happily.
Among the first to be remembered was
Itoom Clerk Millard 'Turner, who got a
nodding Sunny Jim figure with this
comment :
Itdom clerk Turner you all know him,
Ought to call him Sunny Jim !
When mid steam pipes din and thunder,
You do your best to snow him under,
lie will nod and gaily smile
Thinks Its funny all the while!
Mr. Daniel L. Lyon was presented with
a toy rake, hoe and spade and this verse :
FTave you seen him In the bunkers,
Digging in the sand;
Have you seen him dancing madly
With a brassie in his hand?
If you have you're surely thinking
That the time is fit
For him to be supplied with
An excavating kit!
Mr. It. C. Durant got "a tin horn and
this injunction:
You'll find this a lovely camp,
Ever "dry," but never "damp."
When you get so dry you really mourn
Call the Tin Whistles'with this horV.
Mr. C. L; Becker was comforted with
an egg beater and the following :
In spite of Becker's stirrup club
He seems to fail in the rub
So we're sending this to him ;
Something he can beat with a vim.
Mr. W. K. Goodnow was given a me
chanical bird and this lament :
They tell us that this birdie
Is one that you have shot
And we're really very sorry
For we feel you oughter not.
Other verses and the gifts which ac
companied them follow :
Mil. LEONARD TUFTS.
There are many dogs in Pinehurst
And some have won much fame;
But there's one that is a wonder
Lttle Bertie Johnson, with his smile and his
frown.
He's awful fond of fishing and can play a hand
that's pat
So we 're sending him for Christmas this dandy
little yacht.
Yacht.
Mil. IIICHARO C. BUNZL.
Dear Mister Bunzl, 'tis such a funny name
That we are quite truly, very glad you came,
But before you've leaving for the City of New
York
Please don't forget to explain about that golf
match talk;
About the game will Hally, from Pittsburg and
its smoke;
About the cold one fifty; was it all an April joke?
Tor Bank.
And Ponto is his name.
He can write a hunting story,
He can dance a two-step fine.
He really Is in order
For the monumental line.
Woollv Dog.
mrs. leonard tufts.
Here's to the girl with the nut brown hair
You've seen her riding here and there ;
You've passed her smiling on the street
And she's always one you're glad to meet.
Can of Peaches.
mr. w. c. johnson.
Little Bertie Johnson, is once more back in town
MR. A. G. WARREN.
He's surely very busy
For he's always on the jog;
But he may be willing,
To help educate this dog.
-Instructor and Dog (Mechanical Toy).
MR. J. M. EASTMAN.
Twill keep the women busy
This tiny little thing;
Just put in the parlor
And watch them take to wing.
Toy Mouse.
(Concluded on page 2.)
REPRESENTED BY PROXY
Amusing Situations Result at the Col
ored Christmas Tree.
n.
Pickaninnies of all Colora, Conacioua
.Parent and Vlllagre Ciueata
Enjoy the Fun.
HE interest in the Vil-
a g e hall Christmas
trees culminated in the
tree for the colored chil
dren given Wednesday
evening. The hall was
packed to its extreme ca
pacity, the " standing room only " sign
being in order long before the hour set for
opening, and a merry throng it was;
conscious parents in Sunday best, "pick
aninnies " of all sizes, ages and shades of
color, and interested Village guests, all
touching elbows, all with eyes fastened
upon Santa Claus, the glittering tree and
the group at the head of the hall.
Fun and frolic there was from first to
last and Santa was in his happiest mood,
making the most of the many opportuni
ties which presented themselves. At
first it seemed somewhat strange to see
a stalwart negro lad or a buxom lass
come forward to receive a present for
" Uaby Martha Washington Lilly White
Jones," but after awhile it began to be
apparent that not only Baby Martha
Washington Lilly White Jones but
others, were present by proxy.
This was soon evident in connection
with the Gaines family, which numbers
something less than thirty, graded from
little " Baby Eflle Snowdown Mistletoe,"
of six months, to " Cleopatra Elizabeth
Sappho," of twenty-two. Papa " Bunk "
kept coming forward so readily and often
that Santa suggested, much to the
amusement of all, that perhaps it
would be best for him to wait by the tree
until the presents for the various Gainses'
had been unearthed; the amusement of
the whole affair culminating in an uproar
when papa " Bunk," loaded down with
something less than thirty presents, was
called forward to receive a gift that was
all his very own.
Then when "Mrs. Thomas Jefferson
Gaddy" was called for and a little miss
of ten came forward, Santas' incredulous
query "Are you married?" expressed
the curiosity of the visitors. There was
also some perplexity when a comely
young woman came forward to receive a
gift for "Uncle ltobert Lee Stonewall
Jackson," and the order was reversed
(Concluded. on page 5.)
    

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