North Carolina Newspapers

    i PAGE ySSlSSr THE
F1NEHURST
FOR THE YOUNG FOLKS
OUTLOOK Ml 8
& if. (a, y,
XLhc Sborebam; 2SB2
Will; reopen on or about December 15th, having been closed for extensive
structural alterations, improvements, re decorating and re-furnishing:. All
bedrooms now have baths and running water.
W. M. BARSE, Manager
FIREPROOF
EUROPEAN PLAN
NEW
Hotel Continental
Opposite Union Station Plaza
Washington, D. C.
A. W. CHAFFEE, Manager
Rates $1.50 Per Day and Upward
Pinehurst Livery
NEEDLEWORK NOVELTIES
EXHIBITION ROOM
HIGHLAND PINES INN
Weymouth Heights
SOUTHERN PINES, N. C.
The Magnolia
PINEHURST, N. C.
Stoam Heat, Electrle lights, Excellent TabU
SOUTHERN FINES HOTEL,
Southern Pine. HT. V.
J. L. POTTLE & SON, Managers
Hand loom rug weaving by native weaver
Native potter and potter's wheel
Indian basket weaver Colored wood carver
Arts and Crafts Shop
General Office Building
LIFT-THE LATCH TEA ROOM
Plnebluff, N. C.
The Misses Little.
BEST EQUIPMENT
IN THE
MIDDLE SOUTH
Saddle Horses a Specialty
Dobbin - Ferrall Co.. "Sffiasr
Italetg-h, IV. C.
North Carolina's Largest and Leading
DRY GOODS STORE.
Dry Goods of All Kinds and Ready-to-Wear
Garments. The Best.
The Citizens NationalBank
Of RALEIOH, N. C,
(Commercial and Checking Accounts)
AND THE
RALEIGH SAYINGS BANK & TRUST CO.,
(Savings accounts 4 Jer cent quarterly)
Invite correspondence for all kinds of banking.
Combined Resources $2,750 000.00
Joseph G. Brown, Henry E. Litchfobd,
jrresiaent casnler
Your Summer Tour
will -i i ... . ..
a run through picturesque L)lAVIL-L-E. NOTCH
x uu win una msre tne Dest service and homelike comfort ;
and a well equipped garage.
Write for interesting illustrated booklet.
I.IVVICLE WTCM,THE BALSAMS,Hew Uap.hir
Philadelphia Office: 608 Perry Bldg., 16th and Chestnut Sts.
The Strang-e Story of the Children ami
the Water lily Fairy
IT was away down in
the Southland, near to
a great swamp; near
enough to have it said
that there was a great
swamp in their vicinity
and that in that swamp
1 a n d roamed strange
phantoms maybe
ghosts, maybe spirits. It was old Aunt
Nanny who told them this story of the
ghosts or spirits. Their mother and father
had never said anything so ridiculous.
But you all know how superstitious the
good old darkies of the South are.
Well, the ''they" we are telling about
were Paul and Janey Downs, aged re
spectively nine and seven. And they
had lived their short lives in that one
place, their home of hundreds of broad
acres.
swamp? Maybe a " Aunt Nanny
looked about cautiously "maybe a a
spirit. Be careful, honey chile. Keep
clost to Daddy."
Then Paul was off on the run. And
he was late getting home that afternoon.
He saw Janey playing in the kitchen
garden and ran to her. "Oh, sister," he
cried, "I saw some water-lilies. Don't
you recollect that Aunty Nan said there
were always fairies where the water-lilies
grow? I would have stayed close to one
and called three times, 'Fairy, fairy,
fairy, come forth to me !' But I wasn't
alone a second so couldn't do it."
Janey was all attention. "Are the
water-lilies far from here?" she asked.
"Maybe we might go to them alone!
See, it is early yet the sun is quite high.
Could we go and see the water-lilies, and
return before supper time?"
Paul's face Hushed with anticipation.
"Say, sister, that's a good idea," he said.
FIND WHO THE OFFICER IS THINKING ABOUT.
One day in early spring Paul had a
strenuous day for so young a fellow.
He had first had his lessons in the
nursery, and governess had said he was
"doing finely" with his arithmetic and
that she would excuse him from spelling
that forenoon so that he might go with
uncle and daddy to the swamp. Mr.
Downs and his brother Frank (the latter
made his home with his married brother)
had decided to go over to the edge of the
swamp to see about some drain ditches
which were being dug.
As Paul ran down stairs he passed
Aunt Nanny in the hall. "Oh, Aunty
Nan," he said in a whisper, "I'm going
to the swamp with Daddy. Do you
s'pose I'll see anything ? " His
eyes were very wide and he looked ex
pectant. "Lor's bless us, honey ! Who can tell
what a pussen.will see ober by dat
"I know exactly how to go. Let's ask
Aunty Nan about how to get the fairies.
But not a word to her about our going,
mind."
"Oh, not a word, brother." And Janey
shook her head. Then they went to the
summer kitchen where Aunt Nanny was
at work. "Say, Aunty Nan, tell us how
one might get the fairies to come out of
the water-lilies in the swamp," begged
Paul. And he and Janey sat upon the
doorstep.
"Haw! haw' haw! honey chilluns,"
laughed Aunt Nanny, "you alls jest have
to go clost to the pretty water-lilies an'
squat on de bank an' say, whisperin' like,
'Come out, you darlin' fairy ! Come out,
you darlin' fairy ! Come out you darlin' !'
An' pretty soon you alls'll see the water
lily move. Den up pops de fairy, sho'
an' certain ! Dat's all der is to it, chilluns."
    

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