North Carolina Newspapers

    . . i, i u u WJIA m 1
HMMMi THE P1NEHURST ouTLO0KWtg 8
ll . lie. ft
I I III
IT WAS "PARADISE LOST!"
L. P. Hollander & Co.
ANNOUNCE EXHIBITIONS BY THE
REPRESENTATIVES OF THEIR
NEW YORK ESTABLISHMENT
at
The Carolina, Pinehurst
Thursday, Friday and Saturday
February 11th, 12th and 13th
and
Southern Pines Hotel, Southern Pines
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday
February 15th, 16th and 17th
of
WOMEN'S DRESSES, COATS, WAISTS
AND TAILORED SUITS
AND
MISSES' DRESSES AND COATS
An Experienced Fitter In Attendance
HIGHLAND PINES INN
ON WEYMOUTH HEIGHTS
SOUTHERN PINES, N. C.
A beautiful Colonial building luxuriously furnished and equipped with the
best box-spring beds and hair mattresses; accommodating 200 guests and more
than half the rooms have private baths. Greatly enlarged for the present season,
orchestra, Country Club, golf, tennis, hunting, motoring, Faulkenburg riding.
School headquarters; adjoins the great Weymouth Pine woods.
SEASON, NOVEMBER TO MAY.
On main line of Seaboard Air Line Railway. Fifteen minutes motor to
Pinehurst over Capitol Highway. Write for illustrated booklet.
ANDREW I. CREAMER & MILLARD H. TURNER, Proprietors.
FIREPROOF
NEW
MODERN
AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLAN
HOTEL CONTINENTAL
WASHINGTON, D. C.
Opposite Union Station Plaza
This modern fireproof hotel offers every comfort and
convenience at moderate prices.
Room with detached bath $1.50 to 2.00
American Plan $3.50 and upwards
Management of A. W. CHAFFEE
Room with private bath $2.50 to $3.00
Bank of Pinehurst
SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES TO LET
CHECKING AND SAVINGS ACCOUNTS
4 PER CENT INTEREST
J. R. McQUEEN, President F. W, VON CANON, Cashier
Consequently 8enHle I'eoplw Hve
Given Up Seeklngrthe. Eldorado
A HEART TO HEART TALK BY PASTOR DAVIS
WITH HIS FLOCK AND OTHERS
A LETTER came to the
office of the Sandhill
Board of Trade the other
day which contained this
sentence : "It would be
difficult to find a Com
munity of such interest-
c ing people as you have
in the Sandhills any
where else in rural America; but isn't
it a pity that they didn't settle in some
section where the possibilities were great
er ?" H Well, the only answer to this
question is "yes," but the next question
is just where in this world or the next, is
the place that the correspondent had in
mind? One can travel all over the civil
ized world and also cross Texas, without
finding it. The bookworm may burrow
through Mohammad's description of the
Arabian Paradise, Vergil's lines on the
Field's Elysian, John's writings about
the Orthodox Heaven, and John Milton's
verses telling of the Puritan Hereafter,
without finding the slightest trace what
soever of a better place to build up a
diversified agriculture and a healthy,
livable, prosperous country life than right
here in the sandhills of North Carolina.
The only other place to look for
"greater possibilities" would be the
lower regions. Dante gives a vivid and
detailed picture of the Inferno that
haunted the imagination of the Middle
Ages, and Homer tells of Hades; but the
only parts of the Sandhills that are infer
ior to the places described by those
writers are the one or two towns that
are too stiff-necked or dead-in-the-shell
to come into the Board of Trade and help
do the work that is improving condi
tions here and increasing the value of
land ! H Where then are we to find this
Utopia which the letter suggests, and to
which our progressive Sandhillites, ever
bent on making the best better, would
perhaps move en masse like the Israelites
coming out of Egypt or the Mormons
going to Utah?
The soil here has little so called "nat
ural fertility" in it. Thinking men who
are interested in seeing the best agricul
ture and the best rural conditions in the
United States built up here are glad that
the soil is as it is. Plunder farming,
which has impoverished the South and
cursed the West, can never be practiced
here. In Eastern Kansas, where I had
the misfortune to be born, we robbed the
soil year after year and supposed we were
farming ! The fields over which I chased
the corn drill in my freckled youth are
now so poor that they will not produce
grain enough to pay for .their cultivation.
The man who owns them says pessimisti
cally that they are ' ' worn out. ' ' But
Bradford Knapp at Louisville last spring
said : f ' There is no such thing as a worn
out farm; but there may be a worn-out
man on top of the farm." Plunder
farming is done forever on the old home
place, and now after fifty years of hard
work, the tillers of that soil have gotton
to the staring point; that is, they have
gotten to where the Sandhills now are.
Soon or late every farmer in this land of
the free and the home of the crank, must
realize that the soil is very little more
than a prop to hold the plant up and that
he must furnish the ' table board ' ' for his
rops by proper fertilization. This has been
the experience of every old farming coun
try except Egypt. Ecal agriculture be
gins where soil robbery leaves off. IjThe
Sandhills are starting right; we don't
have to mess around half a century before
hitting the up-grade.
The best agriculture, and more notably
still, the best social conditions, are not
found on the best soil. One can challenge
the world on that statement. Buckle's
"History of Civilization" will furnish
all the data one needs to prove the asser
tion. Compare perennially fertile Egypt
with the sand dunes of Denmark, for ex
ample. Agriculture and human achieve
ment have nowhere risen higher than in
Germany, and yet here is what Macaulay
says of Germany in its natural state:
' ' The soil was for the most part sterile.
Even around Berlin, the capital of the
Province, and around Potsdam, the favor
ite residence of the Musgraves, the coun
try was a desert. In some places the
deep sand could with difficulty be forced
by assiduous tillage, to yield thin crops
of rye and oats. Where the soil was rich
it was generally marshy, and its insalu
brity repelled the cultivators whom its
fertility attracted. ' ' That was but a
few decades ago. i And yet that country
already has a glorious past and today has
wealth and strength enough to fight all
Europe to a standstill. Egypt never pro
duced a great people and never will.
After they had spent a few generations
on that rich river soil, it took the Lord
himself forty years to get enough of the
laziness and servility out of his chosen
people to make them fit to possess and
hold the promised land; which, by the
way, is a rougher rockier and more for
bidding territory than any in North
Carolina. Men could be raised in it, how
ever; men who could write poetry like
the Psalms, produce philosophy like
Ecclasiastes, build Solomon's temple, and
when it came to fighting, could route the
hosts of Sisera, or go down into a pit and
in a hand to claw tussle slay a lion on
a snowy day. The men who did these
things were not milk-and-grape juice
pacificists, but real he-men. For good
rural conditions read the book of Ruth.
As for profit, we read that in the time of
Solomon they had made silver as common
as stones in the streets of Jerusalem. But
the records of Egypt can be searched in
vain for such achievements.
But now to reef our rhetorical sails a
little, and drop from the empyrean into
the proximate. H What the deuce is a
good farm anyway? H Dr. Knapp, the
greatest man that the department of agri
vation ever had, said that the ideal farm
should not be large enough to support
the owner without effort, nor so small that
it would make him a mere toiler, for that
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