North Carolina Newspapers

    6
Thursday, November 1, 2001
300 E. Main Street • Carrboro
ITH RETASTERS” (S10) w/ Regatta 69 40 Oz. and
Jettingham
2FR Blueground Undergrass" ($8)
3SA DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE. Trembling Blue Stars.
The Prom” ($8)
4SU Deep Banana Blackout" (SB/S9)
SMO The Arsonists, DJ Swamp, Swollen Members”
($l2
6TU Charlie Hunter w/ Robert Walter s 20th
Congress” ($l4/$l6)
7WE Fishbone" w/ Blowfly & The Veldt (Sl3/Sl5)
BTH Derek Trucksßand"(sl2)w/EmmaGibbs
Band
9FR WXYC 80 s DANCE
10 SA Gillian Welch & David Rawlings” ($l7 adv)
11 SU STEVEN MAIKMUS AND THE JICKS" w/
Morble Volley
12 MO HOT WATER MUSIC, Hot Rod Circuit, Scaries”
($8)
13 TU Preston School of Industry w/Shins and The
Standard" ($8)
14 WE UsaLoeb" (Sl2/Sl4)
151 H Tomahawk (Featuring Mike Pgtton)” (Sl2)
w/Syrup
17 SA O.A.R. (sold out)
18 SU Southern Championship Wrestling
19 MO Bouncing Souls w/Flogging Molly, Madcap"
20 TU Int'l Noise Conspiracy w/ Milemarker &
Hives” ($8)
24 SA Roily Gray and Sunfire
26M0 Angels Of Light w/Virgil Shaw & Chris Lee
27 TU The Strokes. Cave In" ($10)
28 WE Beenie Man” ($l7/519)
29TH Blue Dogs w/Blue String" ($2
30 FR Steve Riley & Mamou Playboys” (Sl2/Sl5)
ISA North Mississippi All-Stars" ($10)
3MO Sick Of It All, Stretch Arm Strong
SWE DISCO BISCUITS" ($l2)
7FR Superdrag w/Comas”
BSA 5,C.0,T.5.” ($10)
9SU Dismemberment Plan, Ted Leo, El Guapo
13TH $2 Pistols & Trailer Bride
15 SA Rev. Horton Heat w/ Dash Rip Rock” ($10)
29 SA The Original Nighthawksw/Jimmy Thackery
& Danny Morris”
SHOWS @ GO! Room 4:
(100F Brewer Ln„ Carrboro 919-969-1400)
11/2 Scaries
II /4 Bitch 8r Animal
11/5 Owen, Cait 8c Kyle w/ Azure Ray
1T /6 Audio Explorations
11/7 Aspera, Delray
11 /8 Ivory Coast & Rodeo Four
11/9 Freedy Johnston" ($10)
11/10 Girty Freak Show
11/11 Engine Down, Fin Fang Foom,
Mercury Program
11/12 Sean O'Hagan (from High
Llamas)
11/13 John Wesley Harding” ($10)
11/14 Pernice Brothers, The Sadies
11/15 Sweep The Leg Johnny
11/16 Circulatory Systems
11/17 David Grubbs
11/19 Angie Aparo
11/23 Annßeretta
11/24 My Morning Jacket
11/27 Icarus Line
12/2 Alejandro Escovedo
ftThfitiMß
11/10 DISPATCH and TAJ MAHAL ($l7) (funky
meters have caiceted)
11/14 STEREOLAB w/Rebecca Gates" ($l2)
11/16 LUCINDA WILLIAMS w/Matthew Ryan”
($22.50)
@ L.P631 506:
11/8 CURT KIRKWOOD” ($10)
a TtW CnrrtoorQ ArtsC enter
11/15 EVAN DANDO" ($l5)
11/29 BRIGHT EYES (SOLO)($ 10)
The BEST live music
18 & over admitted
"Advance ticket sales at SchoolKids
(in Chapel Hill, Durham and Raleigh).
For Credit Card orders CALL 919-967-9053
DON’T BE ALARMED
IF YOU GET A WEIRD FEELING
IN THE PIT OF YOUR STOMACH
AFTER EATING
A
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LOVE CAN OFTEN DO THAT
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WF 306 W. FRANKLIN - 968.7827 SI
1 DEEM “™ l ““ COM |
Blues Guitarist Rocks Live; Voice Fails Lewis
R.L. Burnside
Burnside on Burnside
A series of notes coaxed from a soli
tary slide guitar are enough to grab hold
of new fans for R.L. Burnside’s old style
of music.
The first strains of blues and boogie
immediately draw the listener to the
lively sounds of Burnside on Burnside, the
revered guitarist’s first major live album.
These sounds haven’t been heard in the
polished, restrained blues that have
become popular over the years. This is
music of the past that still sounds new
and vital with its raw, stripped-down
and propulsive nature.
The band maintains a forceful, driving
rhythm even without the use of a bass
guitar. Burnside, his grandson Cedric
Burnside on drums and his adopted son,
Kenny Brown, on slide guitar are able to
keep things tight without it.
At the center of the affair, of course,
is R.L. After all, he embodies the music
he’s played for nearly 50 years. He sur
vived tough times and bad luck, knew
all the women he sings about and lived
the Mississippi-hill-country blues for
much longer than today’s music lovers
have been paying attention.
R.L.’s blues are enhanced by his
strong voice and the wonderful music he
extracts from just one chord. Every now
and then, he adds a joke or interlude for
"" Lmiiina -.rvo-o
Take 15/501 South towards Pittsboro
Exit Main St./Southern Village
BANDITS it i
1:25 7:15
RIDING IN CARS WITH BOYS it. m
1:15-4:15 7:00-9.35
TRAINING DAY IKS
4:00-9:40
SERENDIPITY IKH3I
1:20-3:20-5:20-7:20-9:25
13 GHOSTS ft)
1:30-3:30-5:30-7:30-9:45
mnrxma&iawUißrvnvm
SHREK w;j 7:00 pm
Bargain Matinees Daily until 5:30
All seats $4.75
www.therialto.com
□□ l DOLBY j I STAD| Um
hhhtal Seating
CAROLINA UNION ACTIVITIES BOARD FILM COMMITTEE
flicKS.
www.unc.edu/cuab
$2.00 Student Tickets @ Union Box Office
10am-spm M-F & one hour belore each show
DIVERSIONS
effect before the band launches another
sublime piece of blues heaven.
None of the songs, most of which
were recorded live at the Crystal
Ballroom in Portland, Ore., let go of the
listener. From the marchlike tempo of
“Shake ’Em On Down” to the closing
rowdiness of “Snake Drive,” the set
maintains a pure, enthralling energy.
Luckily for anyone who gives his
music a listen, this energy has not dif
fused with age.
Burnside might be just shy of his 75th
birthday, but his live album is evidence
that he has more than enough life left in
him to grab and shake new listeners
with his potent brand of primitive blues.
fly Elliott Dube
David Lewis
For Now
■kirCrii'Cr
For Now could be a much different
album if David Lewis’ voice was less
suited to a children’s sing-along and
more allied with his impressive lyrics
and carefully arranged instrumentals.
Lewis’ eternally placid singing effec
tively subverts his lyrical power, making
the folk singer/songwriter’s second LP
fall victim to a plague of songs the lis
tener cannot take seriously.
In the oddly rollicking “The Rain
Stops Everything,” one can hear Lewis
sweedy smiling through his lines about
heartbreak. When he sings “My heart is
leaking right through these chains,” it’s
full of sugar and high-pitch.
Regardless of his lyrics’ penchant for
[ paa EASTERN i
k Imm FEDERAL A
kis THEATERS M
Ojp PLAZA THEATRES "\
■ umi Elliott Rd. At East Franklin )
1 mm 967-4737 J
13 GHOSTS 1 Daily 3:15,5:15,7:15,9:15
DONT SAV A WORD 1 Daily 3:20,7:05,9:20
TRAINING DAY I Daily 3:25,7:00,9:25
CORKY ROMANO WSJ Daily 3:10,5:10,7:10,9:10
IRON MONKEY 13 Daily 3:10,5:10,7:10,9:10
Of"* MOVIES AT TIMBERLYnT\
m Weaver Dairy at Airport Rd. )
1 933-8600 /
THE LAST CASTLE jgDaily 3:35,7:00,9:35
MAK KEEBLE'S BIG MOVE H Daily 3:15,5:15,7:15,9:15
BANDITS S3 Daily 3:30,7:00,9:30
K-PAX EH Daily 3:30,7:05,9:30
SERENDIPITY S3 Daily 3:25,5:25,7:25,9:25
RIDING IN CARS WITH BOYS 83 Daily 3:40,7:05,9:40
FTT EXJse) Pg
Advance Tickets Available
Showtimes for today only.
* No passes* No discount tickets
W VISIT OUR WEB SITE! |
t www.easternfederal.com 1
Law School
Exploration Day j
Wednesday, November 7, 2001
12 noon until 3:3opm
Student Union Great Hall
66 Low Schools
OPEN
TO
ALL
STUDENTS
View participant list on University Career Services M
website: http://coreers.unc.edu
by University Career Services Division of Student Affairs
melancholy, Lewis continually lisps
along in upbeat, bouncy tones. The
album, by merit of this continual cheer
fulness, occasionally approaches the trite.
And gende but multi-faceted instru
mentals often dwarf Lewis’ effeminate
vocals, further proving that the vocalist
is indeed the weakest link. Only “Old
Dreams Fade Away," in which Lewis
sings the first verse a cappella, flatters
the singer.
Unfortunately, Lewis more often miss
es than hits. Especially difficult for the lis
tener is the cover of Nick Drake’s
“Northern Sky." The instrumentals are
incredibly fluid and lilt perfecdy in the
Drake tradition. But he can’t hold a candle
to Drake, and Lewis tries to emulate him
repeatedly - Lewis’ voice just does not
have that “Pink Moon” allure of Drake’s.
But there is no doubt that Lewis pos
sesses definite lyrical prowess despite
being vocally challenged. Some particu
larly poignant moments on the album
are preserved through the simple power
of the words that Lewis uses.
On “You Don’t Know,” even Lewis’
voice can’t dilute the insight of lines like
“I was bom the day you kissed me/I
lived a while in between/And I died the
day you left me/In a place where sad
ness goes unseen.” It’s a complicated
sentiment expressed simply and is one
of the album’s highlights.
Too bad an album can’t be all about
the words. Lewis ultimately couldn’t
establish the balance between singing
and songwriting.
fly Michelle Jarboe
vrawswasr ssskew®
sisstis.-sstas””'
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'LIVELY AND PROVOCATIVE’
gll&HIR
7:00. 9:20. SAT-SUN 2:00, 4:20
mMEEp 111
7:10, 9:30, SAT-SUN 2:10, 4:30
‘MOUTH-WATERING! /!<%
“TWO THUMBS UPI" nti/
tbrEilla soup
w
-7:15, 9:20, SAT-SUN 2.15, 4:40
I REMARKABLE!”
P II -BOLDLY IMAGINATIVE! LI.L
1 ” ’jj BURNS WITH STYLE AND ENERGY."
m “An Oscar-caliber performance
■ c- Al , t>ert Brooks!’
my first mister
9.10, SAT-SUN 4 10
BREAD & TULIPS
7:10. 9 25, SAT-SUN 2 10. 4 30
Pseudo Punksters Reach
Horrendous Low Point
By Nick Parker
Staff Writer
Lit’s biggest hit had fresh-faced,
would-be punks singing along to “please
tell me whyeiiieiii” for months, thanks
to 1999’s “My Own Worst Enemy.”
The band has
just released
another album,
and listeners with
any taste should
throw that chorus
back at the group.
Zrey/ews)
Lit
Atomic
★★☆☆☆
Please, tell me why.
After the baffling success of its previ
ous LP, A Place in the Sun, Lit stick* to
the same bouncy melodies in their sec
ond attempt, Atomic. An uncomfortable
mix of pop and heavy metal, Lit’s sound
doesn’t stand out as unique because it
doesn’t conform - it just fails in both
fields.
Much like the music, little has
changed about the band. Still a restless
gang of wannabe romantics, nothing
of any real importance is uncovered or
even explored during the entire
album.
It seems as if the band simply writes
and performs whatever will please the
teenage pop fans that want to be hard
core. A. Jay Popoff, lead vocalist,
whines about a seemingly endless
parade of love “tragedies,” never
go to dailytarheel.com
■ Enigmatic Spaccy Rocks “K-PAX” ■
By Jeremy Fisher
■ “Assassins” Pits Murder Against
Religious Philosophy ■
By Joanna Pearson
■ Favorite Local Band Takes
Audience on Sensory Trip ■
By Brooks Firth
■ McGee Packs High-Energy
Musical Punch I
By Kristen Williams
\ oateAeUtCf, f
Breakfast • Cuncfi * dinner
since 1988
9free detivery to ‘Ll9f£
ianduMclted, uyiapA. & icUadi aoailalle
at all St*tde*t Stored locatia+ui and
the. tyNC eftodfutal InacU haA.
4201 University Drive, Durham
489-5776 • unvw.saladeiia.com D
A Special Event fob the Senior Class
a Hfc
Thursday. Nov. Bth, 2001
9:00 pm in the John Sprurit Hill Ballroom of the Carolina Inn
Featuring Doug Clark and the Hot Nuts
Black Tie
Hosted by
Julians
To benefit the Senior Class Gift
Attendance limited. Tickets $25 per person
Tickets available at Julian's. 140 East Franklin St. 942-4563
ulFfp Uailg ®ar Hppl
diverging from the formula that granted
him his 15 seconds of fame.
The album has no diversity, being
merely a poorly organized pile of shal
low, loveless love songs.
Each lending his own listless drone to
the lost melodies, no member of Lit
boasts particularly strong musical tal
ents. Guitarist Jeremy Popoff relies
more on his distortion pedals than his
abilities, cranking out monotonous
chords that vary only in their amount of
ugly amalgamation of noise.
Hidden in the background, drummer
Allen Shellenberger throws in random
crashes and thumps, establishing chaos
instead of rhythm.
One of the only redeeming factors is
Kevin Baldes, a bassist who delivers
some truly powerful riffs in “Live For
This.” His ability glows moderately in
the background, trying to be recognized
despite the otherwise struggling noise.
Unfortunately, Baldes is drowned out
by the distracting, nasal whine of A. Jay
Popoff, and his lack of versatility as a
singer is only outdone by his weakness
as a writer.
The superficial and often silly lyrics,
(“I got a lot of good drugs/But I don’t
know how to use ’em/So I threw ’em in
the trash/And now my dogs are high as
hell,”) make no sense and dwell on
empty issues. “Sunny Weather” and
“Everything’s Cool” particularly have
nothing to say yet still drag on for sev
eral minutes.
Surprisingly, a: few choice tracks
could be worth the time they take to
play, but not for the price of the LP. The
blossoming “She Comes” stumbles
upon touching lyrics and a rolling beat
while “Lipstick and Bruises” boasts
clever moments and a catchy tune that
isn’t just annoying.
Trying to recreate the sounds that
garnered them fame in the pop-y
teenage circles, Lit has not changed in
the least. Atomic proves that Lit is just
another one-hit wonder band that has
stayed too long at the fair. They are
their own worst enemy.
The Arts & Entertainment Editor can
be reached at artsdesk@unc.edu.
    

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