North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME ill, ISSUE 74
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UNC housekeeper Marsha Tinnen (right) yells the UE Local 150 chant in Polk Place with other members of the N.C. Public Service Workers Union during Tuesday's first teach-in.
WORKERS, STUDENTS
VENT FRUSTRATION
CONTROVERSIAL AUTHOR ATTENDS 2 TEACH-INS, PRAISES BOOK SELECTION
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“The names I would like to see on
these buildings are your names!'
BARBARA EHRENREICH, ’NICKLE AND DIMED'AUTHOR
Bush speech tests
diplomatic waters
Softer stance seeks U.N. help in Iraq
BY BERNARD HOLLOWAY
STAFF WRITER
President Bush set the tone
Tuesday for the creation of a res
olution mandating international
cooperation in rebuilding of Iraq.
Bush addressed the U.N.
General Assembly before rushing
off to meet with a cadre of world
leaders, including U.N. Secretary-
General Kofi Annan and French
President Jacque Chirac.
There is disagreement about
whether the president’s attempts
at diplomacy will work, since
Chirac and other world leaders
dispute the reasons for the war.
“The war, which was started
without the authorization of the
(U.N.) Security Council, has shak
en the multilateral system,” Chirac
said in a speech to the assembly,
which followed Bushs remarks.
Charles Pena, director of
defense policy studies for the
CATO Institute, said he expected
Bush to be more ardent in his
§9
INSIDE
1,000 WORDS
Hugh Morton, renowned documentary photogra
pher, spends time at his alma mater PAGE 6
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
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defense of the Iraq war.
“I expected (Bush) to take more
of a bullying stance with the U.N.,
and instead he tried to soften his
rhetoric with calls to their core
values and principles,” he said.
But assembly members joined
Chirac in objecting to Bush’s
statement that the war was justi
fied by Iraq’s alleged possession of
weapons of mass destruction.
Before Bush’s address, Annan
echoed the sentiments of member
states in attendance. “Weapons of
mass destruction do not threaten
only the western world,” he said.
“But when states go beyond that
and decide to use force to deal with
broader threats of international
peace and security ... they chal
lenge the fundamental principles
that world peace and stability have
rested upon for the past 58 years.”
Control of the rebuilding
process in Iraq is at stake, said
SEE BUSH, PAGE 2
www.dailytarheel.com
BY ANDREW SATTEN
STAFF WRITER
UNC workers' frustrations came
to a head Tuesday during a teach-in
hosted by the N.C. Public Service
Workers Union UE Local 150 fea
turing summer reading author
Barbara Ehrenreich.
Hours later, Ehrenreich attended
an additional teach-in, organized by
University students, faculty and
staff.
During her brief afternoon
speech, Ehrenreich echoed the sen
timents of workers and students
speaking at the teach-ins, all of
whom spoke out against the actions
of UNC administration.
“There seems to have been some
reading comprehension problems
(by the administration),”
Ehrenreich said of her book “Nickel
and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in
Honor takes forefront
BY NIKKI WERKING
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
Journalism Professor Chuck
Stone’s voice crackled through
loudspeakers in the Pit on
Tuesday afternoon.
As Honor and Integrity
Week’s ethicist spoke of the cul
ture of honor and reciprocal
respect, many students contin
ued their usual activities, talking
on cell phones and pushing
through the crowds toward
Lenoir Dining Hall.
But other students stopped
some with lunches in hand to
listen to his message.
Honor has been a core value at
the University since the first offi
cial honor system was instituted
in 1875, although that atmos
phere has slowly faded over the
years, Student Attorney General
Jonathan Slain said.
But that tradition is something
University officials are hoping to
revive. This week’s focus on honor
is part of a yearlong
Honor Carolina Initiative to
renew the importance of respon
sibility and truth on campus.
“I want to have the level of
trust that would allow you to play
m
America.”
David Brannigan, grounds work
er and member of UE Local 150,
hosted the afternoon event, which
featured several speakers including
grounds workers and housekeepers.
While Chancellor James Moeser
said state personnel regulations pre
vented the event from being classi
fied as paid leave or community
service hours for workers, about 30
employees turned out, many sacri
ficing their lunch break. More than
100 people total attended the event.
The event, which was held on the
steps of South Building, featured an
array of student groups that support
the workers’ cause, including the
Black Student Movement, Student
Action with Workers and Feminist
Students United.
After being rushed from the air
port because of a delayed flight,
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Sophomore Annie Immediata (right) signs the honor pledge in the Pit
on Tuesday while sophomore Jeanne Morris supervises the table.
a game of poker over the tele
phone,” said Chancellor James
Moeser. “1 think that’s the ideal to
which we’re aspiring.”
He said it is imperative that
members of the University com
munity build relationships of
trust with one another to foster
UNC’s commitment to honor.
This obligation extends beyond
INSIDE
UNDEFEATED
The Tar Heel field hockey team earns a win in its
final game before facing No. 1 Wake Forest PAGE 9
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2003
Ehrenreich first praised the admin
istration regarding the Summer
Reading Program’s selection.
However, it was not long until the
tone shifted toward one of bashing
the administration —a common
theme of the day as evidenced by the
ffont-and-center dummy of Moeser,
adorned with glasses, top-hat and a
sign that read, “Hear nothing, say
nothing and do nothing.”
Moeser had said he would not be
able to attend.
“The turn-out was fantastic,” said
Jon Lepofsky, an organizer of the
afternoon event and a graduate stu
dent in geography. “It would have
been nice if (Moeser had) turned
out, but once again he chose not to
listen to the voice of the workers,
and he lost out.”
SEE TEACH-INS, PAGE 2
the decision not to peek at anoth
er student’s test or copy work
from a book or the Internet. The
concept of integrity pervades in
all situations, both big and small.
“Honor is what students do
when nobody’s looking," Slain
said. “Students need to take time
SEE HONOR, PAGE 5
WEATHER
TODAY Sunny, H 82, L 54
THURSDAY Mostly sunny, H 84, L 56
FRIDAY Partly Cloudy, H 77, L 56
Rush
policies
raising
doubts
Greek leader cites
jurisdiction gap
BY MEGAN DAVIS
STAFF WRITER
Less than a week after fraternity
Bid Day, doubts have surfaced in
the University community sur
rounding the Interfraternity
Council’s ability to consistently
enforce fraternity rush policies.
Seven violations of IFC rush
policies were cited during the three
weeks of fall rush, a small increase
from last year.
None of the violations resulted in
police or Alcohol Law Enforcement
involvement, although both have
jurisdiction over IFC in cases of
underage drinking.
Misconduct reports comprised
violations of the IFC’s dry rush
policy and holding rush functions
during the blackout days agreed
on by the IFC.
The Office of Greek Affairs
refused to release a complete list of
violators, although such a list is
public record under state law.
IFC President Wyatt Dickson
said there is a jurisdiction gap
SEE RUSH, PAGE 2
CRIME REPORT FOR CHAPEL HILL
Blown
H Northside
-ill
2002-2003 2002-2003
Personal Crimes Property Crimes
•per capita (1000)
SOURCE: http://www.townofchapelhill.org
DTH/MICHAELA IDHAMMAR
Crime
level up
in town
Local efforts lead
to Northside drop
BY SHANNAN BOWEN
STAFF WRITER
Chapel Hill officials and
Northside neighborhood residents
say their collaborative efforts to
reduce the neighborhood’s crime
level have been successful despite
a townwide increase in crime.
A recent report that compares
the first six months 0f2002 to the
first half of 2003 showed a 7 per
cent increase in townwide per
capita crime and an 18 percent
decrease in crime in Northside.
The per capita crime rate in
Northside is 48.6, compared to
Chapel Hill's per capita crime rate
of 26.4.
The biggest change in Northside
was a 41 percent drop in larceny
charges, though townwide larcenies
increased from 845 to 952.
For both Chapel Hill and
Northside, the numerical change
in crimes was limited, with 82
more crimes townwide and 8
fewer crimes in Northside.
The decline in Northside crime,
which is seen as a major contribu
tor to townwide crime, is a direct
result of officer and resident inter-
SEE CRIME, PAGE 2
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