North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 111, ISSUE 132
Tuition proposal gets trimmed
MOESER: ORIGINAL PROPOSED f6,000 INCREASE EXCESSIVE
BY GREG PARKER
STAFF WRITER
The UNC Board ofTrustees will
consider a one-year $1,500 tuition
increase for nonresidents at its
meeting next week, and much of
the revenue generated would go to
merit-based and athletic scholar
ships, according to documents
obtained Ibesday.
University officials also have
determined that only a $3,600
nonresident hike not the $6,000
originally estimated is needed to
place UNC in the 75th percentile of
its peer institutions for out-of-state
tuition.
Teach-in
to debate
tuition
increases
BY BRIAN HUDSON
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
Student government leaders, in
conjunction with the Out-of-State
Students Association, will host a
teach-in tonight at 7 p.m. in 116
Murphey Hall to speak out against
proposed tuition increases for out
of-state students.
“I think we just need to make
sure students know what’s going
on,” said Student Body President
Matt Tepper.
“We have to give people a way to
respond to these potential tuition
increases.”
UNC’s Board of Trustees will
discuss the idea of raising out-of
state tuition during its Jan. 21
meeting.
Tepper and other student lead
ers began organizing the meeting
earlier this week as a way for stu
dents to voice tuition concerns.
Tepper will speak at today’s
teach-in, but he will be acting as a
member of the BOT rather than
student body president.
“Basically, I’m going to be pre
senting as a BOT member what
the BOT discussed and make sure
students are aware of what’s going
on,” he said.
Dan Herman, president of the
Graduate and Professional
Student Federation, also will speak
tomorrow.
“I want to really give the grad
uate student perspective, why we
are important to the University” he
said.“ Especially how we are impor
tant to gaining research dollars
and helping undergraduate stu
dents by teaching classes.”
Herman said that about 40 per
cent of graduate students and 70
percent of first-year graduate stu
dents hail from out-of-state since
there is no enrollment cap.
A tuition increase targeting out
of-state students would be a
recruitment decision with strong
negative effects, he said.
Student Body Vice President
Rebekah Burford and Joy Diggs,
Out-of-State Student Association
president, also are scheduled to
SEE TEACH-IN, PAGE 5
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DTH/KATHY SHUPING
Junior Paige Worsham (right) rings up sophomore Meredith Talton's
spring semester textbooks Tuesday afternoon in Student Stores.
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Chancellor James Moeser dis
cussed some of these changes with
Student Congress in a question
and answer session "Riesday night.
Moeser told Congress that the
$6,000 tuition increase was recal
culated and found to be excessive.
“Someone did the math wrong,”
Moeser said after the meeting.
According to a presentation pre
pared for the BOT’s Jan. 21 meet
ing, officials now are comparing
UNC’s tuition with a group of 10
peer public schools. The board for
merly had compared tuition with
only its top four public peers.
When compared with the larger
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DTH/JUSTIN SMITH
Residence Hall Association president candidate Colin Scott (left) and his campaign manager Peter Franzese listen in at the mandatory
meeting for all students seeking elected office Tuesday night in Manning Hall. Eighteen candidates are running for six positions.
AND THEY’RE OFF
Students kick off another student election season, declaring candidacies
BY ARMAN TOLENTINO
STAFF WRITER
The 2004 student election campaign sea
son officially kicked off Tuesday night when
prospective candidates gathered in Manning
Hall for a mandatory meeting to declare their'
candidacies formally.
Board of Elections Chairwoman Melissa
Anderson went over the election rules and
reminded all candidates and their campaign
managers to abide by the Student Code.
“This board will not hesitate to issue fines to
those who violate the Student Code,” she said.
Ten students, up from four last year,
declared themselves candidates for the posi
tion of student body president.
Prospective SBP candidates expressed con
cern about the increase in the number of peo
ple running but said they look forward to the
campaigning that lies ahead.
“We’re going to have to be really forward
with people and really proactive,” said junior
Lily West, an SBP candidate.
SPORTS
BATTLING THE TERRS
The Tar Heels will hit the road in a tough
ACC match against Maryland PAGE 5
www.dailytarheel.com
peer set, UNC only needs to raise its
nonresident tuition to $19,508 to
place in the 75th percentile.
Trustees indicated Jan. 7 that
they want to raise out-of-state
tuition to the upper quartile with
in the next few years.
But Student Body President Matt
Ttepper said Tuesday that the effects
of the initial $1,500 tuition increase,
if approved, will be examined before
considering additional increases.
Tepper praised the move but
added that he still has concerns
about the size of the increase and
the proposed use of the money.
“It’s moving in the right direc
STUDENT ELECTIONS 2004
One student intends to run for Residence
Hall Association president, two for Carolina
Athletic Association president, one for
Graduate and Professional Student Federation
president and two for senior class president.
INSIDE
Check out
who's running
for student
office this year
PAGE 4
requires candidates to obtain a set number of
signatures to qualify for student congress allo
cations, the only permitted source of cam
paign funds.
Starting today, candidates may solicit sig
natures but are not allowed to campaign.
Students running for student body president
and CAA president must obtain at least 800
signatures. Those running for RHA president
or senior class office must have 300 signa-
Books’ late arrival irks campus
Publisher, software blamed for delay
BY CAROLINE KORNEGAY
STAFF WRITER
Professors and students alike
are frustrated that they are still
waiting for textbooks to arrive at
Student Stores.
In some cases, a computer
glitch caused the problem. In oth
ers, it was the publisher’s fault.
Whatever the reason, many
students have had to start their
semesters without some essential
texts.
The biggest problems have
tion,” Tepper said. “But I still think
there are some of the same issues
that need to be examined.”
In the proposal, tuition for N.C.
residents would increase S3OO.
■ Moeser stressed to Congress the
importance of focusing on the
issues that continue to bring
tuition increase discussions to the
forefront, notably the need to sat
isfy and retain top faculty.
“We are literally being picked
apart in raids by private institu
tions,” Moeser said. “Key faculty
are being wooed away.”
SEE CONGRESS, PAGE 5
tures, while GPSF presidential candidates and
those running for Student Congress must col
lect a minimum of 20 signatures.
Candidates will have only three school days
before the holiday weekend to collect signa
tures, which are due Jan. 20.
Junior Ashley Castevens, an SBP candi
date, said the long weekend should not have
much of an impact on the petition process.
“I think any serious candidate will be able
to get the signatures,” she said.
Candidates may start campaigning orally
once they turn in their petitions, and a week
later they may use funds to purchase cam
paign materials.
Anderson said, “I’m just hoping that
everyone took seriously my point that we are
going to enforce (the Student Code) as well
as maintain the integrity of campus elec
tions.”
Contact the University Editor
at udesk@unc.edu.
The four-week cam
paign period will culmi
nate with the general elec
tions Feb. 10.
The Larson-Daum
Campaign Reform Act,
which took effect starting
with last year’s elections,
been depleted stocks of primary
textbooks for Spanish 3 and
Political Science 42 at Student
Stores, although hundreds of stu
dents have had to start the semes
ter without books for many of
their other classes.
Virginia Gray, a professor of
political science, said she filled out
an online form to reorder the text
books she used last semester.
Although a shipment of one of
the textbooks was delivered, the
primary text failed to arrive. Gray
INSIDE
WILD THING
The Carnivore Preservation Trust is a
haven for wild animals at odds PAGE 3
WEDNESDAY JANUARY 14, 2004
Faculty call for
tuition caution
BY BROOK R. CORWIN
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
The executive committee of the
Faculty Council has drafted an
eight-part resolution calling for a
more careful approach by UNC-
Chapel Hill officials in their ongo
ing discussions to raise tuition.
The resolution will go before the
entire Faculty Council at its Friday
meeting, less than one week before
said she didn’t find this out herself
until a student told her Sunday.
The 120 students in Gray’s class
without books are forced to do
without one until anew shipment
of the texts arrive.
“I would say two-thirds don’t
have the book,” Gray said.
When Gray checked with
Student Stores, the staff said the
mistake was caused by a comput
er glitch. “They essentially blamed
it on an inventory software prob
lem,” she said.
So for now, unless they can find
SEE TEXTBOOKS, PAGE 5
WEATHER
TODAY Sunny, H 47, L 35
THURSDAY Mostly sunny, H 50, Ll 9
FRIDAY Sunny, H 43, Ll 9
UNC-CH’s governing body is set to
vote on a possibly substantial
tuition increase for nonresident
students.
The resolution sharply warns
against using any tuition revenue
for athletic scholarships and large
increases in tuition for North
Carolinians.
SEE RESOLUTION, PAGE 5
Student
opinion
divides
panel
System tuition
hike considered
BYCLEVE R. WOOTSON JR.
STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
The necessity of a potential
across-the-board tuition increase
is in the hands of a roughly 90-
member committee comprising
faculty and students from across
the UNC system.
But most students on the com
mittee of campus representatives,
including UNC-Chapel Hill
Student Body President Matt
Ttepper, say they see no valid reason
to recommend a tuition increase to
system President Molly Broad.
The increase would come in
addition to any campus-initiated
tuition increases that schools
would proffer for the Board of
Governors’ consideration.
“I’m pretty much in favor of the
(UNC-CH) TViition Task Force rec
ommendation,” Tepper said. “For
an additional Board of Governors
increase to go on top of that, that
would just be a little bit excessive,
especially when we have a poten
tial legislative increase as well.”
UNC-CH’s delegation to the spe
cial committee also includes
Rebekah Burford, student body
vice president; Elmira Mangum,
associate provost for finance; and
Shirley Ort, director of scholarships
and student aid.
The relatively informal commit
tee on which they serve will
attempt to reach a consensus on a
board-initiated tuition increase at
its next videoconference, sched
uled for Jan. 23.
If it doesn’t, Broad will present
the committee’s conflicting views
to the BOG, which plans to decide
on tuition increases by Feb. 13.
Jeff Davies, UNC-system vice
president for finance, told the
BOG last Friday that the commit
tee had not yet finalized a recom
mendation. He said that about half
of the committee thought a 2 per
cent increase was appropriate,
while most students on the com
mittee were against a systemwide
increase.
One of those students is
Jonathan Ducote, UNC
Association of Student
Governments president and
nonvoting member of the BOG.
“I don’t think that it’s necessary
to raise funds just for the sake of
raising tuition,” Ducote said.
For every 1 percent increase in
student tuition across the system,
the UNC system collects about
$5.3 million in receipts.
Both Ducote and Tepper said
they think the system did not indi
cate a concrete need for the
increase. “There really wasn’t any
need,” Tepper said. “They were kind
SEE COMMITTEE, PAGE 5
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