North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 111, ISSUE 132
200 gather for tuition teach-in
STUDENT LEADERS VOICE
OPPOSITION TO $1,500 HIKE
BY EMILY STEEL
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
As the lyrics “Come together,
right now,” echoed through the
lecture hall Wednesday night,
about 200 students organized
to learn about the impact pro
posed tuition increases could
have on their university.
“You folks are the future.
You are the stewards of this
institution,” said Faculty
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DTH/JANE NOVOTNY
Student body president hopeful Faudlin Pierre (left) speaks with junior Brian Rackley (right) while sophomore Adam Serlin signs Pierre's petition. Each of the 10
student body president candidates have until Jan. 20 to collect the 800 signatures needed to appear on the ballot. The signature requirement was increased last year.
CANDIDATES FACE
FIRST CHALLENGES
BY MARY BETH BARDIN
STAFF WRITER
An uncommonly high number of candidates and
the upcoming Martin Luther King Jr. holiday led to
fierce first-day competition for campaign petition
signatures Wednesday.
The 10 candidates running for student body pres
ident must gather 800 signatures each to be placed
on the ballot for the Feb. 10 election.
Because double-signing is not allowed, a total of
8,000 student names are required to keep all the
candidates in the race.
But most candidates said that they were not fazed
by the loss of a class day to gain
signatures and that the extra
challenge will bring out the
best in the race.
STUDENT 1 A
ELECTIONS Ut
Desi in me race.
“I think that getting the signatures in the short
amount of time shows that you’re serious about run
ning and about getting your message out,” said
Matthew Calabria, a junior political science and
public policy major.
Candidates said they welcomed the added chal
lenge of reaching out to a wider range of the student
body.
“It forces us to go out and talk to more students,
which is a good thing,” said Matthew Compton, a
junior history and peace, war and defense major. “A
race like this is good for the school.”
Laura Thomas, a junior international studies and
peace, war and defense major, stressed the impor
tance of student signatures.
“If my administration is going to represent all of
the student body, I have to show that I can get out to
800 people,” she said.
A time extension was not considered because of a
strict elections code detailing specific regulations.
“Petitions must start 28 days before elections,”
said Melissa Anderson, Board of Elections chair
woman. “We can’t change deadlines because it’s stip-
CONGRATUIaATIQNS
NEW HIRES ARE POSTED
Stop by the DTH in Union 104 today to
check out your spring desk assignment.
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
®hr iaiht ®ar Merl
Council Chairwoman Judith
Wegner.
“The trustees really want to
do the best for this university,
but we need to remind them
that we are the University.”
Both in-state and out-of
state students filled the seats
and stood in the aisles at the
teach-in sponsored by student
government and the Out-of-
State Students Association.
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ulated in the code.”
The election code also prohibits candidates from
presenting their platform when petitioning signa
tures, an additional obstacle to the petition process.
“It’s frustrating to not be able to tell people, ‘This
is what I stand for and this is who I am,’” said Ashley
Castevens, a junior public policy major. “The reason
I am running is for issues and ideas, and it’s hard not
to be able to tell people.”
Lily West, a junior political science and journal
ism major, said she also found difficulty in sup
pressing her campaign platform.
“But I think students would rather have someone
who followed the rules... and told them their plat
form later down the road,” she said.
Most candidates said they were optimistic despite
the challenges presented by the campaign.
“I’m pretty confident that I’ll get the signatures I
need,” said Micheal Jones, a junior history and
African and Afro-American studies major. “You just
have to be persistent, determined and double up on
time and the things you do.”
Contact the University Editor
at udesk@unc.edu.
INSIDE
NATIVE APPEAL
Bricks outside Student Union to feature
work of American Indian artist PAGE 3
www.dailytarheel.com
They listened as student lead
ers explained a proposed
tuition hike that would cost
nonresidents $1,500 next year.
Student Body President Matt
Tepper pointed to a “spiky” line
graph that depicted recent non
resident tuition increases.
“I’ve been in enough meet
ings to know tuition philoso
phy,” he ssid. “It’s supposed to
go up gradually, and as you can
see, it’s not.”
Students held a “cheat sheet”
that covered the basics of the
campus-based tuition increase
proposal to keep in-state
ELECTIONS 2004
tuition in the lowest quartile
among 10 public peer institu
tions and to raise out-of-state
tuition about $3,600 during
several years. The move would
place nonresident tuition in the
75th percentile among peers.
“I think it is always danger
ous to start doing these tuition
comparisons,” Tepper said.
Officials have trimmed the
figures from previous propos
als that projected out-of-state
increases as high as $6,000
during a three-year period.
The new proposal has yet to
be studied and, if passed, will
Pit won’t serve
as race locale
BY BRIAN HUDSON
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
For the first time in several years, candidates run
ning for student office will not be able to campaign in
the Pit UNC’s center of social activity.
During an informational meeting Tuesday, Board
of Elections Chairwoman Melissa Anderson dis
cussed some of the rules candidates needed to follow
during the elections.
She explained that no candidate will be allowed to
campaign inside the Pit because she determined that
the election code could not address numerous con
cerns about the Pit’s use.
BOE officials had attempted to reserve the Pit, but
the request was not approved by Carolina Union offi
cials, Anderson said.
Student Body President candidate Matt Calabria
said the BOE had reserved the Pit in past years so sev
eral candidates did not attempt to make reservations
on their own behalf.
“The expectations from a lot of the candidates was
that the Pit would be reserved for us,” Calabria said.
“Obviously that wasn’t done.
“My understanding is that since it’s already
reserved by other groups, it can’t be used unless relin
quished by those groups,” he said.
In order to create a fair campaigning atmosphere,
Anderson said, candidates will not be able to use the
center of the Pit, regardless of prior reservations they
had made.
SEE PIT, PAGE 2
SPORTS
TAR HEELS STUMBLE
The Tar Heels allow Terps to catch up and
then win in close matchup PAGE 4
be, as Wegner has said, a “live
experiment” on the student
body.
Leaders noted the funda
mental shift both tuition poli
cies and the philosophy of the
University would take if the
proposals are approved.
“We don’t want to put our
selves in a position that this
university is one that is differ
ent than it has been in the
past,” said Rebekah Burford,
student body vice president.
Burford underscored the
SEE TEACH-IN, PAGE 2
THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 2004
h JHS& flv s '
DTH/JUSTIN SMITH
Students pack Murphey Hall on Wednesday night for a
teach-in about proposed nonresident tuition increases.
Campus
to drop
journal
contract
BY JOSEPH SCHWARTZ
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
Biology Professor Lawrence Gilbert said he
experiences difficulty completing his research
because of the unavailability of many scientific
journals in UNC-Chapel Hill libraries.
His task soon might become more difficult.
One of the largest publishers of scholarly jour
nals, Elsevier, will not renew its
contract with a network of
schools that includes the
University.
Gilbert said the absence of an
agreement will prolong his
research.
“It would make it very diffi
cult because I use the online
access to all the Elsevier jour
nals,” he said. “I use them all
the time when I write papers
and when I write grant appli
cations.”
Amid qualms with indeter
minable escalating prices and
a requirement to purchase unwanted journals,
UNC-CH officials said the Triangle Research
Libraries Network will not renew its contract
with Elsevier, a Dutch company that provides a
wealth of scientific, technical and health research
source information.
The TRLN comprises Duke University, N.C.
State University, and N.C. Central University in
addition to UNC-CH. The contract provided all
schools access to the online journals.
However, Joe Hewitt, associate provost for
libraries, said UNC-CH will continue to subscribe
to Elsevier journals on an individual basis, even
though they will cost more when not bought in bulk.
“We are trying to cancel enough (journals) so
that our payments to Elsevier will be about the
same as they were last year.”
Hewitt said UNC-CH spends about $1.5 million
per year to purchase journals from Elsevier.
He cited the company’s inability to lock in a
yearly price for a multiyear contract as a key issue,
SEE JOURNALS, PAGE 2
University’s
town talks
upset locals
BY DAN SCHWIND
ASSISTANT CITY EDITOR
A neighborhood advocacy group is questioning
a system encouraging one-on-one meetings
between Chapel Hill Town Council members and
University officials.
The Town Council received a petition Monday
night from the Coalition of Neighbors Near
Campus asking the council to take steps toward
ending the policy. The coalition is a group com
prising people who live near the University.
But at least one UNC official said the policy is
designed merely to help foster better town-gown
relations, particularly with two new council mem
bers coming onto the scene, and work out issues
with the ever-growing topic of Carolina North.
SEE PETITION, PAGE 2
WEATHER
TODAY Mostly sunny, H 50, L 20
FRIDAY Sunny, H 43, L 20
SATURDAY Partly cloudy, H 46, L 33
Provost
Robert
Shelton
said journals
cost too much.
o
    

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