North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 111, ISSUE 135
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THEASSOCIATED PRESS/M. SPENCER GREEN
Candidate U.S. Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass. at a victory party Monday after being declared winner of the lowa Caucus. Below: Sen. John Edwards, D-N.C., finished second.
KERRY TAKES IOWA;
EDWARDS CLOSES IN
Unlikely upsets in caucus race leave a defiant Dean in 3rd, Gephardt defeated
THEASSOCIATED PRESS
DES MOINES, lowa John Kerry and John
Edwards rode llth-hour surges to a one-two finish in
lowa’s kickoff presidential caucuses Monday, dealing
a stunning blow to favorite Howard Dean.
Kerry's comeback blew the nomination fight wide
open, setting the stage for a free-for-all in New
Hampshire’s follow-up primary.
Dean finished third, stripped
of his front-runner’s mantle but
still defiant. “We will not give
up,” he told backers.
PRESIDENTIAL
PRIMARIES *O4
Rep. Dick Gephardt finished a weak fourth and
planned to end his 33-year political career by pulling
out of the race.
His campaign given up for dead just weeks ago,
Kerry predicted another comeback in New
Hampshire’s Jan. 27 primary. “As I’ve said in New
Hampshire and here, I’m a fighter,” the Massachusetts
lawmaker told The Associated Press. “I’ve come from
behind before, and I’m going to take the same fight
that I’ve been making here to New Hampshire.”
Edwards, 50, also claimed momentum.
“This campaign, this cause, this movement is
about bringing real change to America,” Edwards
told supporters. “You and I can build an America and
an image of America that we will be proud of.”
Just two weeks ago, before the lowa race turned
Tuition hike may
strain grad funds
BY LYNNE SHALLCROSS
SENIOR WRITER
Marko Dumancic likely is not the type of student
people think of when they discuss the UNC Board of
TVustees’ proposal to raise tuition.
When it comes to the tuition
increase, Dumancic has three fac
tors working against him: he’s a
nonresident, a graduate student
and an international student.
Like many other nonresident
students, Dumancic, a native of
SHIFTING
THE BURDEN
Today: Grad Tuition
Wednesday: Enrollment
Scholarships
Thursday: Philosophy,
Priorities
Croatia who is working toward a doctoral degree in
history, heard the news about the tuition increase
looming on the horizon and became concerned.
Graduate students are in a difficult situation when
tuition rises because, unlike most undergraduates,
many are paying back loans or supporting a family and
might not be able to turn to their parents for help. For
Dumancic, things are even more complicated.
“We are not eligible to take student loans out,”
Dumancic said, adding that banks will not provide
loans to international students due to their foreign
status. “We’re sort of stuck. Some of us might be
forced to discontinue our studies.”
As the BOT prepares for a vote this week on the
largest campus-based tuition increase in recent school
history, nonresident graduate students like Dumancic
SEE TUITION, PAGE 4
n
INSIDE
GOVERNOR'S RACE 2004
N.C. Sen. Patrick Ballantine spoke to the Triangle
West Republican Club on Saturday PAGE 6
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
01ir Satin @ar Hrrl
testy and tumultuous,
Dean and Gephardt sat
atop the field in lowa,
with Dean leading in
both New Hampshire
and national polls.
Kerry and Edwards
turned that on its head,
closing their campaigns
with positive, forward
looking messages while
Dean and Gephardt
bickered about past
votes and quotes.
“My campaign to fight for working people may be
ending tonight, but our fight will never end,”
Gephardt said in a post-caucus speech that sounded
like a political farewell.
His shirt sleeves rolled to his elbows, his voice ris
ing to a shout, Dean tried hard to reset expectations.
“If you would have told us a year ago we would
come third in lowa, we would have taken anything for
that,” he yelled and later ticked off the primary states
beyond New Hampshire. Dean said he called Kerry
and Edwards and told them, “I’ll see you around the
comer, around the block, starting tomorrow.”
But the new day will bring new challenges for
Dean. His vaunted Internet-driven organization,
MLK Day inspires celebration, protests
BY CHRIS GLAZNER
AND DAN SCHWIND
ASSISTANT CITY EDITORS
What started as a church service
honoring the late Rev. Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. ended Monday in a
protest against what organizers see
as modem injustices.
Local clergymen and guest speak
ers led ceremonies at the First Baptist
Church on Roberson Street celebrat
ing what would have been Kings 75th
birthday by exhorting citizens to take
part in the political process.
“It doesn’t matter what race you
are. As long as racism and discrim
ination exist, you have an obligation
to do something,” said Carolyn
Coleman, guest speaker at the serv
ice. In describing King’s life,
Coleman emphasized the need for
citizens to vote and continue the civil
rights leader’s fight against injustice.
She also pointed out that despite
the advances toward equality made
since King’s death, discrimination
still can be found nationwide.
“If you don’t know that racism still
exists in this country, you’re either
blind, deaf or dead,” Coleman said.
Her words were echoed by
Rebecca Clark, namesake of the
www.dailytarheel.com
- U
1 Sr jsM
DTH FILE PHOTO/GILLIAN BOLSOVER
which helped him raise more than S4O million and
dispatch 3,500 volunteers to lowa, didn’t deliver. His
anti-war, anti-establishment message didn’t resonate.
His rivals Kerry and Edwards here and Wesley
Clark in New Hampshire didn’t back down.
Indeed, Clark rose in New Hampshire polls while
Dean slipped in lowa. Now, the retired four-star
Army general has turned his sights on Kerry, a dec
orated Vietnam War veteran.
“He’s got military background, but nobody in this
race has got the kind of background I’ve got,” Clark
said. “It’s one thing to be a hero as a junior officer.
He’s done that. I respect that... but I’ve got the mil
itary experience at the top as well as at the bottom.”
STRONG GAINS
FOR EDWARDS
Edwards' relatively quiet
campaign enjoyed a late
surge, which the
candidate attributed to
a positive campaign.
■ John Kerry 38%
■ John Edwards 32%
* Howard Dean 18%
■ Dick Gephardt 11 %
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People’s
Rebecca Clark Award, which she
received Monday. Clark, who has
worked as a housekeeper and a
nurse UNC, was recognized for
her work in getting people to vote.
Clark’s success as a precinct cap
tain for the Democratic Party made
her a fixture of local politics and
helped bring about the election of
Howard Lee as the first black mayor
in Chapel Hill.
J.R. Manley also was honored as
he was presented the Martin Luther
King Award for his civil rights work
and his 55 years serving as pastor
for the church.
The service was followed by a
march down Franklin Street led by
civil rights attorney A1 McSurely.
About 350 marchers sang songs that
marked the 1960s civil rights move
ment, such as “We Shall Overcome.”
The march concluded at the
Chapel Hill Post Office, where the
commemoration continued with a
rally featuring speeches by several
local community leaders.
The Rev. Curtis Gatewood, pres-
SEE MLK, PAGE 4
“We must hold up the example of Dr. King....
We have to stand together.”
THE REV. CURTIS GATEWOOD, Durham naacp president
Jk w j
DTH/ASHLEY Pin
Lorna Chafe (center) joins members of the Raging Grannies outside the Chapel Hill
Post Office after a march down Franklin Street, which ended in protest Monday.
SPORTS
PULLING IT OFF
In a turning point, the Tar Heels manage to upset
Connecticut, the top team in the nation PAGE 14
TUESDAY, JANUARY 20, 2004
Faculty
condemns
BOT plan
on tuition
BY BRIAN HUDSON
ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EDITOR
UNC-Chapel Hill’s Faculty Council whose mem
bers, administrators say, have the most to gain from
a campus-based tuition increase has condemned
unanimously the Board of Trustees’ tuition proposal.
During the council’s meeting Friday, members
approved a resolution opposing the BOT’s proposal
to raise tuition $1,500 for nonresident students. The
board is considering the move partly to generate
funds to retain and recruit faculty.
The council’s eight-point resolution expressed par
ticular concern about routing the funds generated by
the increase to athletic scholarships, and advised that
some of the revenue go toward financial aid for cur
rent students that would be affected by tuition hikes.
Chancellor James Moeser responded to the reso
lution at Friday’s meeting, urging council members to
consider the goals of a campus-based tuition increase.
“At its core, this campus-based tuition proposal is
about supporting the intellectual capital of this
University, mainly the faculty.”
But Moeser said he thinks the BOT should deter
mine the effects of continued nonresident tuition
increases before enacting them. He said, however,
that the board is likely to enact a large one-year non
resident tuition increase at its Jan. 22 meeting
despite opposition from students and faculty.
“I think there are lots of nuances on how this gets
SEE RESOLUTION, PAGE 4
Thefts top
apartment
crime stats
BY SHANNAN BOWEN
ASSISTANT CITY EDITOR
Students in search of off-campus housing for next
semester should be aware of larcenies and other
crimes in apartment complexes, police and property
officials say.
According to the 2003 crime statistics released last
week by the Chapel Hill Police Department and the
Carrboro Police Department, larcenies were the most
frequent crime committed in local apartments.
The 59 complexes included in the statistics expe
rienced 583 acts of larceny, which was defined by
police as the taking or stealing of property without
the use of violence or fraud.
The statistics also noted rapes, burglaries and
motor vehicle thefts for 41 apartment complexes in
Chapel Hill and 18 complexes in Carrboro.
Jane Cousins, spokeswoman for Chapel Hill police,
said an apartment’s number of residents, location and
SEE CRIME, PAGE 4
WEATHER
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THURSDAY Sunny, H 53, L 25
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