North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 111, ISSUE 141
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DTH PHOTOS/BRIAN CASSELLA
Sen. John Edwards, D-N.C., greets a crowd of about 200 at the Radisson Hotel in Merrimack, N.H., after the New Hampshire Democratic primary was called Tuesday
night. Edwards finished fourth, just behind retired Gen. Wesley Clark. Below: Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., who won the primary, speaks in Keene, N.H., on Monday.
KERRY PULLS AWAY;
OTHERS TREAD WATER
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MANCHESTER, N.H. - John Kerry
overpowered Howard Dean to win New
Hampshire’s primary Hiesday, scoring a sec
ond-straight campaign victory to establish
the four-term senator as the Democratic
Party’s presidential front-runner.
“It’s an enormous victory, a huge turn
around,” Kerry told The Associated Press.
“We were written off for months and
plugged on and showed
people the determina
tion we have to defeat
President Bush.”
PRESIDENTIAL
PRIMARIES'O4
Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina and
retired Army Gen. Wesley Clark were in a
distant race for third. Sen. Joe Lieberman of
Connecticut was in fifth place, his candida
cy in peril.
After trooping through coffee shops, coun
try stores and living rooms of lowa and New
Hampshire, the candidates now move to the
cold realities of a national campaign: airport
rallies and multimillion-dollar ad buys in
seven state holding contests next Tuesday.
With 70 percent of the precincts report
ing, Kerry had 39 percent, Dean had 25 per
cent, Clark 13 percent, Edwards 12 percent,
and Lieberman 9 percent.
Dean, the former five-term governor of
Vermont, lost by double-digits less than
he needed for a complete rebound or to
erase doubts about his viability. He did man
Tuition hikes soon
likely at peer schools
BY LAURA YOUNGS
ASSISTANT STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
UNC students could experience
the effects of hefty tuition increas
es proposed for several public uni
versities next year, as the
University aims to keep its out-of
state tuition
competitive
with its national
peers.
UNC officials
agreed last
week to track
the University’s
INSIDE
UNC finalizes
use of funds
from proposed
tuition increase
PAGE 3
out-of-state tuition with 10 public
peer institutions at least two of
which are considering unprece
dented increases next year.
The University of California-
Berkeley and the University of
California-Los Angeles, both of
which UNC considers peers, might
increase out-of-state tuition by at
least $5,000 next academic year.
The University of California sys
tem could experience a jump from
$19,740 to $24,672 on average for
j&a
INSIDE
ON THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL
Photo Editor Brian Cassella offers a pictorial essay
of Sen. John Edwards' New Hampshire bid PAGE 7
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
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age about twice as many votes as either
Edwards or Clark and found solace in gain
ing ground since his disastrous third-place
finish in lowa.
“It looks like we are going to finish a solid
second,” said Dean, who with Kerry is flush
with money and support needed to wage a
lengthy campaign.
Edwards, who finished a surprise second
in lowa, predicted he would finish in the
SEE PRIMARY, PAGE 8
“I don’t think it’s a
very healthy way of
setting tuition.
We’re headed down
a dangerous path.”
MATT TEPPER, sbp
nonresident tuition and fees, in
addition to $372 million in cuts
under legislation proposed by Gov.
Arnold Schwarzenegger, said
Hanan Eisenman, media coordi
nator for admissions at the UC
system Office of the President.
UNC ranks four spots behind
both California schools in terms of
cost, but UNC’s Board of Trustees
set a goal last week of narrowing the
gap significantly within several
years. The University’s increases are
in line with an unprecedented mar
ket-based philosophy that aspires to
SEE TUITION, PAGE 8
| www.dalKytarheel.com |
Edwards shifts gears
for ‘must-win’ in S.C.
BY MATT HANSON
SENIOR WRITER
MERRIMACK, N.H. -
After finishing a surprising sec
ond in the lowa caucuses, U.S.
Sen. John Edwards of North
Carolina gained further
momentum in New Hampshire
this week but trailed Gen.
Wesley Clark on Tuesday in a
tight battle for third in the
nation’s first primary.
Edwards was happy simply to
increase support in New
Hampshire before the
Democratic candidates scatter
across the nation for a whirl
wind of primaries in the weeks
to come.
“What I wanted to do is come
from the low to mid-single dig
its, which is where I was 10 days
ago, up into the teens,” Edwards
said.
The senator did just that by
hosting 111 New Hampshire
Young voters get hopefuls’ attention
Use humorous , irreverent media
BY LINDA SHEN
STAFF WRITER
Presidential candidates in
2004 are changing how they
reach constituents, tailoring infor
mation to be streamed through
television and the Internet to
appeal to younger voters. It’s the
year of the 18 to 35 demographic.
A recent Pew Foundation study
shows that the predominant
source of elections information is
still the television. In recent years,
however, cable news stations have
been joined by programs such as
Comedy Central’s “The Daily
Show with Jon Stewart” as
sources of political information.
The report found that people
younger than 30 increasingly are
getting information from late
night talk shows and Web sites. In
the four years since the founda
tion’s last survey, the popularity of
network news as a source of polit
ical information among people in
that age bracket has dropped from
39 percent to 23 percent. Internet,
0B
town hall meetings before the
Jan. 27 primary, said Tait Sye,
Edwards’ deputy press secretary
in New Hampshire.
“All over we had overflow
rooms —and overflow rooms
that overflowed,” Sye said.
Like his Democratic rivals,
Edwards spent Tuesday drop
ping in on polling sites around
the state.
His primary night event was
moved to a hotel in Merrimack
to account for larger-than
expected crowds. The senator
watched from an upper room
with his wife, Elizabeth, and
daughter, Cate, as voter
precincts reported their ballot
counts.
With seven primaries taking
place across the nation Feb. 3,
the candidates will fan out and
contest for 336 delegates of the
SEE EDWARDS, PAGE 8
comedy shows and network news
now rate about the same.
“It’s clear there’s been a kind of
fractionalization of media usage,”
said Ferrel Guillory, director of
UNC’s Program on Southern
Politics, Media and Public Life.
Candidates no longer speak
exclusively through network or
cable news shows, and campaigns
are changing tactics and growing
increasingly creative, Guillory said.
“From the standpoint of political
actors, communicating has
become much more difficult.”
Young voters are a valuable
demographic group, but not all
college-age people are students in
politically active environments.
Research done by the New
Millennium Young Voters Project
shows that fewer than 1 in 5 peo
ple between the ages of 18 and 24
voted in 1998. With generation’s
size surpassing that of the baby
boomers, it’s a demographic with
enormous potential if only
someone could get and keep its
SPORTS
SHOCKING
The women's basketball team takes a close yet
devastating loss to Wake Forest on Monday PAGE 4
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2004
Legislation
threatens
athletics at
college level
Bill could remove California
universities from the NCAA
BY CHRIS GILFILLAN
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
From the NCAA’s perspective, California Senate
Bill 193 is a sleeping giant, waiting for an opportu
nity to destroy collegiate athletics as it currently
exists.
The Student Athletes’ Bill of Rights presently mov-
STUDENT ATHLETES'
BILL OF RIGHTS
v#
A three-part series
examining how California
legislation might threaten
the future of the NCAA
Today: National Impact
could cripple collegiate athletics as a whole.
Now, Murray and the NCAA are locked in a legisla
tive wrestling match that began with a 26-10 Senate
vote in favor of the bill last spring and could continue
until this fall.
Murray isn’t alone in his mission against the
NCAA. He stands with legislators in Nebraska, Texas
and Colorado, all of whom have attempted similar
legislation within the past five years.
He also has elicited the support of the Collegiate
Athletes Coalition, a powerful voice behind the draft
ing of the bill.
“It’s somewhat of a grappling match to get these
athletes a better lifestyle and a better experience for
the time they put into the university,” said Michael
Mistretta, a legislative aide to Murray.
Senate Bill 193 mandates that no institute of high
er education, public or private, belong to an organi
zation that dictates the terms of scholarships in five
principal areas:
■ Granting of scholarships or stipends below the
actual cost of attendance;
■ Money earned by employment not associated
with their sport;
■ Health insurance;
■ The ability to obtain licensed representation for
career choices;
■ The ability to transfer to another institute of
higher education if a head coach leaves the school of
attendance.
The root of the problem for the NCAA comes in
the payment of stipends to full-scholarship athletes:
Should universities be responsible for additional costs
such as travel, health insurance and extra living
expenses?
As the rules stand, full-scholarship athletes receive
money to cover room, board, books and tuition. They
also can receive need-based Pell Grants from the fed
eral government to cover living and travel expenses.
But controversy over the extra expenses has forced
the NCAA to consider compromising on several issues,
said Jeff Howard, NCAA director of public relations.
For example, its Committee on Financial Aid and
Amateurism voted Aug. 1 to permit athletes to earn
money from outside employment with the exception
of jobs based on the student’s athletic ability.
But according to the CAC, each of the 17,000 schol
arship student-athletes in California should receive
SEE NCAA, PAGE 8
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DTH FILE PHOTO
Mo Rocca (left), formerly of Comedy Central's “The Daily Show," visits
UNC in 2002. Young voters tend to get news from late night shows.
interest.
Comedy shows seem to be doing
just that. According to the Pew
report, 61 percent of voters are
gleaning political information
from Jay Leno’s monologues, Jon
Stewart’s jokes and skits on
“Saturday Night Live”.
WEATHER
TODAY Sunny/windy, H 42, L 21
THURSDAY Mostly sunny, H 49, L 28
FRIDAY Showers, H 53, L 26
ing through the California legis
lature could create a doomsday
scenario for NCAA-sanctioned
athletics in the state —and have
reverberating effects across the
country.
The bill, proposed by state Sen.
Kevin Murray, D-Los Angeles,
could earn student-athletes a big
ger slice of the revenue pie, but it
“(These programs) certainly are
not null of content, “ said George
Rabinowitz, a UNC professor of
political science.
Camilla Ihenetu, a junior politi
cal science and international stud-
SEE YOUTH, PAGE 8
O
    

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