North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 111, ISSUE 154
UNC system may see more cuts
STATE SEEKING PROJECTIONS
THAT CUT UP TO 3 PERCENT
BV STEPHANIE JORDAN
ASSISTANT STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
The Office of State Budget and
Management sent budget reduc
tion scenarios to the Office of the
President last week, asking UNC
system schools to prepare for cuts
of possibly as much as 3 percent.
“This is a pattern that has hap
SBP role
goes far
beyond
campus
Diplomacy plays
big part in office
BY AMY KINGSLEY
STAFF WRITER
Student body president cam
paigns often focus on campus
issues, but the success of the office
often depends on diplomatic savvy
at many levels of government.
In addition to mediating
between student groups, the stu
dent body president must commu
nicate student interests to the
UNC administration, the Chapel
Hill Town Council and the N.C.
General Assembly.
In Chapel Hill, “The student
body president may be second only
to the mayor as an elected official,”
said Jonathan Howes, special
assistant to the chancellor.
Recent tension between resi
dents and students, particularly in
the Northside neighborhood,
underscore the need for better stu
dent communication with town
officials.
Other issues, such as trans
portation and parking changes,
affect both students and residents,
Howes said.
Both candidates in the runoff for
student body president advocate
increasing student participation on
town boards and committees.
Candidate Lily West said she
plans to create a government rela
tions executive assistant who
would oversee student relations
with Chapel Hill, Carrboro and
Orange County.
“We have to go beyond the
University walls,” West said.
Candidate Matt Calabria
emphasized the importance of
respect and communication
between Town Council members
and the student body president.
“It is important to maintain col
laborative relationships,” he said.
Howes echoed this sentiment.
“The Town Council looks to the
student body president as some
one who speaks to students,” he
said. “There is no substitute for
personal contact.”
Both candidates stressed the
importance of collaborating with
council members sympathetic to
student issues.
Calabria cited council members
SEE DIPLOMACY, PAGE 5
DTH FILE PHOTO/PAILIN WEDEL
If elected, student body president
candidate Lily West plans to create
a position to improve relations
between students and the town.
ONLINE
Odor grabs officials' attention
Check out more articles and
photos at dailytarheel.com
Serving the students and the University community since 1893
(The lath} ®ar Mrri
pened in previous years,” UNC-
Chapel Hill Provost Robert
Shelton said.
But he added that he was sur
prised at the request.
“(Unlike previous years,) state
collections receipts are on target,”
Shelton said. “This sends a very
depressing message. It says that
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John Dickey works to prepare flower arrangements
for customers at Chapel Hill Florist on West
Franklin Street on Saturday in the midst of the
Valentine’s Day rush. The store was packed with cus
tomers searching for last-minute gifts and deliverymen
scurrying to complete orders throughout the day, which
Quality requires
hikes, officials say
Ducote still skeptical about raises
BY CHRIS COLETTA
AND CLEVE R. WOOTSON JR.
SENIOR WRITERS
One of the UNC system’s top
officials said Friday that tuition
increases likely will be necessary
to ensure that students receive a
quality education.
Brad Wilson’s statement came
just hours after the system’s
Association of Student
Governments demanded
accountability measures for cam
pus-based tuition increases.
Wilson, the chairman of the
UNC-system Board of
Governors, said the board must
weigh the cons of rising costs
against the need to provide
schools with adequate funding.
“Low tuition without high
quality is no bargain,” Wilson
said. “So this tuition debate is
really about whether this board is
going to permit the continued
erosion of the quality of public
higher education in this state.”
He added that although he
does not necessarily support
tuition increases, lagging faculty
salaries, larger class sizes and
fewer course sections have made
it necessary to consider the issue.
But ASG President Jonathan
www.dailytarheel.com
the budget is going as predicted
but plan for more cuts.”
He said the state budget office
might be asking for the figures just
to be safe or it might be an annual
requirement.
Jeff Davies, vice president of
finance for the UNC system, said
State Budget Officer David McCoy
sent over the request for the sce
narios.
“These projections will let the
governor know what we need,” he
said.
VALENTINE’S DAY RUSH
Ducote said he sees the issue dif
ferently.
Balking at nonspecific terms
such as “academic excellence” as
justifications for increases,
Ducote said that since North
Carolina’s hikes began in earnest
five years ago, students have not
seen an increase in the quality of
their education something he
said the proposals on the table
wouldn’t fix.
He added that the system does
not have a set process for ensur
ing that individual universities
spend the money from tuition
hikes in the ways they say they
will, which allows campuses to
use their funds to support “busi
ness as usual.”
“Students and families are
tired of writing blank checks and
seeing nothing in return for their
hard-earned money,” he said.
All of the system’s 16 schools
have proposed campus-based
increases of between 9 percent
and 19 percent to the BOG,
which also is considering a sys
temwide increase of about 2 per
cent. UNC-Chapel Hill has pro
posed a S3OO hike for in-state
SEE BOG, PAGE 5
INSIDE
FOR THE KIDS
Dance Marathon works to raise
money for sick children PAGE 3
Davies said UNC-CH has not
yet had a chance to examine the
budget reduction scenarios, which
ask the president’s office what
would happen if 1 percent of a uni
versity’s budget was cut, what
would happen if 2 percent of the
budget was cut and so forth.
As of Sunday, none of the 16 sys
tem schools had received the
requests. Shelton predicted the
universities should see them either
Monday or Tuesday.
Because of the requests’ impor
is well known as the busiest holiday of the year for florists.
According to CNN, a 1998 survey by the Society of
American Florists found that 30 percent of men wait until
Feb. 13 to purchase gifts for Valentine’s Day, which is cel
ebrated as a day of romance only in the United States,
Canada, Mexico, Great Britain, France and Australia.
Compton, Liles endorse West
BY BROOK R. CORWIN
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
Citing her leadership abilities
and willingness to reach out to the
entire student body, former stu
dent body president candidates
Matt Compton and Matt Liles,
along with the executive board of
UNC’s College Republicans,
endorsed Lily West last weekend
for student body president.
Compton and Liles finished
third and sixth in the general elec
tion, receiving 17 percent and 4.9
percent of the vote, respectively.
Former candidate. Faudlin
Pierre, who finished fourth with
7-8 percent of the vote, endorsed
candidate Matt Calabria.
Compton praised the platforms
of both candidates and said either
would make a good student body
president but said that West would
do the best job of getting students
involved with student government
and in administrative decisions.
“It came down to experience
and the way she leads,” Compton
said Sunday night. “Lily will make
student government more acces
sible, and that’s what we need.”
Compton’s endorsement letter
noted the challenges the
University will face in the coming
year, including mounting tuition
and the implementation of plans
for Carolina North. He said West
is the best candidate to lead stu
dent interests on such issues.
“The students at this school are
going to need a president who will
SPORTS
LET DOWN
The Carolina women's basketball
team falls to Duke PAGE 10
tance, Shelton said, the schools
would act promptly, and UNC-CH
probably would have its response
ready the same week.
The process involves speaking
with vice chancellors and deans
and asking them how they would
handle budget cuts, he said.
The requests were announced at
the UNC-system Board of
Governors’ monthly meeting
Friday.
“We have heard a lot of conver
sations about going to the (N.C.)
DTH/NANCY DONALDSON
m mm
DTH FILE PHOTO/SAMKIT SHAH
Lily West (right) earned endorsements from former SBP candidates Matt
Compton and Matt Liles. Matt Calabria got a nod from Faudlin Pierre.
bring both the force of personali
ty and the knowledge of this place
that command respect,” the letter
states.
In his official endorsement let
ter, Liles also commended
Calabria’s qualifications but laud
ed West’s strength in bringing stu
dents together.
“Lily unites and motivates
everyone she comes in contact
with to be the best,” the letter
states. “That is what we need next
year when the student body pres
ident will be called upon to lead
the fight both on campus and off.”
Pierre said his endorsement of
Calabria is not motivated by politi
WEATHER
TODAY Partly cloudy, H 36, L 23
TUESDAY Snow, H 35, L 27
WEDNESDAY Sunny, H 46, L 30
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2004
General Assembly to get what you
need,” said UNC-system President
Molly Broad. “But we have to be
realistic here. •
“There’s evidence that there’s
not going to be anything relevant
coming to the University in terms
of new dollars.”
Because only the president’s
office has received the requests,
Shelton said, he did not know
whether the cuts would be perma-
SEE BUDGET, PAGE 5
Panel
passes
North
funds
BY LIZZIE STEWART
STAFF WRITER
With a record amount of fund
ing available to allocate to student
organizations, Student Congress’
Finance Committee appropriated
more than $15,000 last weekend
to the UNC College Republicans to
bring retired Lt. Col. Oliver North
to campus.
The organization received the
most funding during the commit
tee’s annual finance weekend,
securing $15,556.70 of the $212,
720.35 appropriated to 70 student
organizations.
After evaluating proposals from
each organization, the committee
was left with a surplus of
$91,604.72, Finance Committee
Chairwoman Natalie Russell said.
The surplus was caused both by
an increase in the student activity
fees collected and a decrease in the
number of student groups seeking
funds.
The increase in the student
activity fee to $19.50 per semester,
approved in a student referendum
last year, allowed Student
Congress to have a budget of
$304,325.07 to allocate to 70 stu
dent organizations.
Last year’s budget provided
$164,000 for almost 90 organiza
tions.
SEE FINANCE, PAGE 5
cal reasons and instead cited a per
sonal allegiance to the candidate.
“Matt’s really looked out for me
at several points during the cam
paign ... and I want to look out for
him,” Pierre said.
An interest in seeing more stu
dents involved in campus issues
also was the primary motivation
behind the College Republicans’
endorsement, said organization
president TVipp Costas.
“Lily’s personality connects with
the student body at Chapel Hill*
Costas said. “When there’s a big
issue on campus, Lily’s going to
SEE ENDORSEMENTS, PAGE 5
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