North Carolina Newspapers

    iattg (Tar Heel
STUDENT CONGRESS ALLOCATIONS TO STUDENT GROUPS
Organization Requested Recieved
lAGStaff $16,070.21 $14,720.21
2 - Amliss $580.00 $35.00
3. Students Association $6,878.00 $962.00
4. of UNC $496.36 $315.00
5 Best Buddies $530.00 $280.00
6Bhangra Elite $5,190.00 $1,825.00
7-Bio. Grad. Students Assoc. $1,300.00 $0
B.Black Student Movement $18,290.00 $12,580.00
9Blank Canvas $1,500.00 $1,500.00
10. & White $10,266.56 $7,749.52
11. Boiling Point $2,625.70 $2,625.70
12. $6,936.00 $6,856.00
13GAA $5,432.89 $5,432.89
14-CAMS. $900.00 $710.00
15. Focus $2,037.00 $410.00
16. Caribbean Assoc. $1,547.00 $1,217.00
17. Indian Circle $10,611.20 $6,765.00
18. Media Monitor $ 1,168.57 $480.00
19. Minorities & Coll. $3,205.78 $183.00
20. Mock Trial $714.00 $714.00
21. Carolina Review $3,427.78 $3,427.78
22. Photog. Assoc. $2,873.00 $2,873.00
23. Quarterly $5,000.00 $4,700.00
24. Students for Life $ 13,970.00 $ 110.00
25. Style Dance Cos. $1,934.61 $1,417.01
26. $16,328.00 $6,246.00
27. $6,530.00 $140.00
28. $8,050.00 $1,517.00
29. $3,709.80 $3,574.80
30. USA $1,795.00 $785.00
31 .CIVIC $7,050.00 $105.00
32. Republicans $31,652.20 $15,556.70
33. Science Club $5,820.70 $196.00
34. $8,267.31 SIBO.OO
35. $615.25 $557.25
36. Branch $26,240.00 $13,740.00
SOURCE: STUDENT CONGRESS
Demand for licenses soars
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO - Demand
for same-sex marriage licenses has
been so great that on Sunday offi
cials turned away hundreds of gay
and lesbian couples lined up out
side City Hall, saying they simply
didn’t have the time or resources to
meet all the requests.
San Francisco authorities calcu
lated they could process 400
licenses during special weekend
hours —but on Saturday they
granted 600 licenses and per
formed 270 weddings by late after
noon. Then officials gave numbers
to 320 couples securing them
places in line for Sunday.
After quickly distributing
another 80 numbers Sunday
morning, disappointed couples
lined up around the block were
asked to return Monday.
“We’re at capacity right now,”
said Mabel Teng, the official who
oversees marriage licenses for city
government.
BUDGET
FROM PAGE 1
nent.
“I hope that the request is ask
ing us for a one-time cut rather
than a permanent cut,” he said.
Shelton added that with non
recurring cuts, the University only
has to find the money once, which
is not easy to do and does have an
impact, “but it’s not permanent.”
Cuts to the budget could have
an impact on retaining faculty, and
with Gov. Mike Easley against
raising tuition, the system might
have to scrape its pockets for the
money.
“Another budget cut cuts into
our ability to provide quality edu
cation,” Davies said.
State (!) National Editor
Cleve Wootson
contributed to this article.
Contact the State (!) National
Editor at stntdesk@unc.edu.
BOG
FROM PAGE 1
students and a historic SISOO
increase for out-of-state students.
UNC-system President Molly
Broad said that even though no
official measure of accountability
exists to keep tabs on what schools
do with such large amounts of
money, officials work on an honor
system that hasn’t provided any
cause for concern in the past.
She also said that in spite of
N.C. Gov. Mike Easley’s recent let
ter stating that he will try to pro
vide full funding for the system’s
needs —a letter championed by
Ducote and other ASG members
there aren’t any indications that
legislators will provide the money.
“These are permanent cuts, and
we’ve been asked for plans of cuts
of 1, 2 and 3 percent,” Broad said,
referring to requests the system’s
Office of the President received
from the Office of State Budget
and Management asking officials
to examine potential budget cuts.
The BOG is set to vote on
tuition increases at its next full
meeting, scheduled for March 19.
Contact the State (!) National
Editor at stntdesk@unc.edu.
Organization Requested Recieved
37. $54,028.18 $12,391.00
38. . $1,766.30 $1,766.30
39. $19,208.00 $7,104.00
40. for Humanity $2,940.00 $2,030.00
41. The Hill $2,386.32 $2,386.32
42. Students Assoc. $325.00 $0
43. System Outreach $11,987.00 $11,062.00
44.lnterVarsity $5,056.88 $1,731.88
45.lris $6,340,050 $6,200.00
46. $9,300.00 $6,700.00
47. Theatre $9,620.00 $9,230.00
48. Grad. Stud. Assoc. $850.00 $630.00
49. $802.60 $707.60
50. $916.69 $839.50
51. Muslim Students Assoc. $330.00 $0
52. $3,160.00 $870.00
53. Hillel $1,000.00 $410.00
54. Journal of Law & Tech. $3,554.40 $3,146.64
55. Center $1,400.00 $875.00
56. $2,725.00 $960.00
57.0asis $3,900.00 $1,650.00
58.0 SSA $520.00 $0
59. Players $2,500.00 $2,500.00
60. Alpha Delta $7,338.28 $70.00
61. Cross $2,235.50 $1,128.00
62.SATA $570.00 $220.00
63. Saturdays in Christ $14,700.00 $540.00
64.SEAC $2,343.00 $1,211.00
65. Self-Knowledge Symposium $4,180.00 $2,135.00
66. Student Congress $3,300.00 $3,300.00
67. Surge $4,500.00 $0
68. Honor Court $8,264.80 $6,070.00
69. Nations Org. $2,955.25 $2,940.25
70. $500.00 $470.00
71. VOX $1,205.00 $665.00
72. Democrats $3,700.00 $295.00
“We normally do about 20-30
couples a day. We’re doing about
50-60 an hour.”
Many couples stayed in line
despite instructions from city offi
cials, hoping to receive numbers
for Monday.
“It’s a major disappointment,”
said Jill Kasofsky, 40, who had
lined up with spouse-to-be Cynthia
Juno, 45, at 8:15 a.m. after driving
up from Los Angeles.
“I’m thinking about coming
back at midnight to sleep on the
sidewalk. I’m sure I won’t be
alone.”
Couples from even farther away
said they were ready to stay in
town for as long as it took.
“Mentally, we came prepared to
camp out if we had to,” said Mike
Fry, 43, who flew out Saturday
from Minneapolis with George
Hamm, 44, his partner of 20 years.
In a controversial challenge to
both legal and social convention,
San Francisco officials began issu
flattened Condom 'WeeA
GET IT ON
Come into a Planned Parenthood Health Center near
you between February 16-20 and enter The Condom
Count to win: a jar full of free condoms and goodies!
Call for opening hours:
1765 Dobbins Drive, Chapel Hill, 942-7762
820 Broad Street, Durham, 286-2872
www.plannedparenthood.org/ppcnc
A Dining Tradition in Chapel Hill
Since 1948
Open Daily 11:00am-l0:30pm • 157 ’A E Franklin Street • 919-942-5158
From Page One
ing same-sex licenses and officiat
ing at City Hall marriages
Thursday. The city has gone out of
its way to provide the services
City Hall normally is closed
Sundays.
The decision prompted two con
servative groups to press for court
intervention.
But on Friday a judge allowed
the weddings to continue through
the weekend.
The issue returns to court
Tuesday, when judges will hear
separate requests from advocates
of traditional marriage to void the
licenses and order the city to stop
giving them out.
The two organizations argue
that the licenses violate state law,
which defines marriage as the
union of a man and a woman. San
Francisco officials counter that
they are legally binding docu
ments that take a swipe at dis
crimination against same-sex cou
ples.
FINANCE
FROM PAGE 1
“We definitely didn’t go in there
with the mentality, ‘Let’s just spend
as much as possible,’” Russell said.
“We made the cuts that needed to
be made.”
Members of the College
Republicans said North likely
would come around Sept. 11 to
speak about how soldiers work to
ensure Americans’ liberties every
day.
Erica Spencer, secretary for the
College Republicans, said the com
mittee was very careful with the
money that they promised and
tried to keep the big picture in
mind.
She said one of the reasons for
the student fee increase was to
enhance the Carolina experience
by bringing speakers such as North
to campus.
“(The Finance Committee)
wanted to see this speaker, since
he’s someone who would unify the
campus,” she said.
Freshman Jordan Selleck, a can
didate for chairman of the College
Republicans, said one of the issues
that arose at the meeting was the
concern that $15,000 was being
DIPLOMACY
FROM PAGE 1
Jim Ward and Mark Kleinschmidt
as advocates for students, while
West named Kleinschmidt, Sally
Greene and Bill Strom.
Diplomatic strategies vary slight
ly at die state level. “What is impor
tant is choosing priorities and being
really clear about what the interests
are that you are trying to communi
cate,” said Kevin Fitzgerald, special
assistant to the chancellor for state
government relations.
One challenge that faces the stu
dent body president is the timing
of the legislative session. This year,
the General Assembly is in session
from mid-May to July.
Calabria said he wants to
improve the visibility of students in
Raleigh, particularly by reviving
the UNC Lobby Corps. “Lobbying
efforts have had moderate success,”
Calabria said. “But it has dwindled
in recent years.”
West said she advocates using
an independent study course in
political science to train student
lobbyists. “Strength is not always
in numbers when it comes to lob-
ENDORSEMENTS
FROM,PAGE 1
make the effort to be inclusive of
all thoughts and opinions.”
Compton said he will let his
campaign workers decide for
themselves who to support in
Tuesday’s election.
He said he planned to discuss
with West ways he could help her
campaign personally during its
Young?
Are you or a loved one in trouble
with Heroin, Oxvcontin, Percoc^ltea
The Duke Addictions Program is testing a
new medication to help young people who
can't stop using drugs tike Heroin. .
Oxycontin. or Percocet If you are 14 to 21
and would like to stop using narcotics but
can't do it on your own, you may be eligible.
If you are eligible for our research study,
the medication and counseling will be tree.
■di
For more information, contact Karen
McCain at 919-668-2198 orejiail
mccaioo3@mc.duke.edu. or visit
http://dukehealth.org
IkH 4787
1/2 Price
Buffalo
Chicken
Sandwich
(Regularly $7.29)
Valid through 02/29/04
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2004
“We definitely didn’t go in there
with the mentality, 'Let’s just spend
as much as possible’”
NATALIE RUSSELL, finance committee chairwoman
spent to fund a special interest that
would not benefit the entire cam
pus.
“They were very inquisitive,” he
said. Selleck said that North would
not bring only conservative ideas
to campus and that he would
renew patriotism in every student.
Other groups were also able to
secure a greater percentage of their
funding requests than in years
past.
“You can tell that there’s an
increase in an availability of
money,” said Rachel Boren, treas
urer of N.C. Hillel.
Russell said that student publi
cations, which have been cut in the
past, got more money this year.
She said that in past years, the
Finance Committee could finance
publications’ budgets only for the
fall semester, but this year it was
able to fund them for a full year of
she issues.
But Russell said that even
“The most effective student body
president is the one who listens . Just
voicing an opinion isn’t enough.”
DEAN BRESCIANI, interim vice chancellor for student affairs
bying,” she said.
Both candidates said they want
to improve relationships with leg
islators from both parties.
The third external front for stu
dent body president communica
tion is with the UNC administra
tion and Board of Trustees. The
recent tuition debate has brought
to the forefront the importance of
effective student representation in
this arena.
Dean Bresciani, interim vice
chancellor for student affairs, said
listening is a key attribute for suc
cessful interaction with the BOT.
“The most effective student body
president is the one who listens,”
he said. “Just voicing an opinion
isn’t enough.”
Because of the immediate
impact the BOT has on student
life, it is important that the student
body president maintains person-
final push.
“I’ve known her for as long as
I’ve been here and seen her work
on project after project,” said
Compton, who has worked with
West in student government and
the Freshman Focus Council.
“She’s never let the school
down.”
Contact the University Editor
at udesk@unc.edu.
though Congress had more money
to distribute to a smaller number
of groups, they did not substan
tially increase funds for all groups.
Among those who did not
receive their full request was the
Asian Students Association, which
did not secure funding for Black
April, an Asian-American alterna
tive band that they hope will per
form at the group’s annual Journey
into Asia program.
The committee asked that the
band commit to a specific date for
the concert before it would allocate
funds, a request ASA members
said was reasonable.
“I understand that they have to
give money to so many organiza
tions,” said Corina Gonzalez, treas
urer of ASA. “They need to know
exactly where their money is
going.”
Contact the University Editor
at udesk@unc.edu.
al relationships with trustees,
Bresciani said.
West has proposed more public
debates and forums where stu
dents can communicate their
views to BOT members. She also
said she wants to better publicize
BOT meetings.
“Board of Trustees members are
very detached,” West said.
In dealing with the BOT,
Calabria stressed preparedness
and tenacity. “It’s a matter of doing
your homework and sticking to
your guns,” he said.
Ultimately, the power of the
student body president lies in the
person’s ability to generate empa
thy for students. “I think the
opportunity to lend a student voice
and have that voice resonate is
important,” Bresciani said. “They
can make the audience feel what
the student is feeling.”
Contact the University Editor
at udesk@unc.edu.
WOOD FIRED PIZXA
CHAPEL HILLS BEST BRICK OVEN
PIZZA, PASTA, SALADS S,
SANDWICHES
OPEN LATE NICHT
SERVING CHEAT FOOD
TIL 1:00 AM
24 BEERS ON TAP
9
14 WINES BY THE CLASS
9
CHAPEL HILL'S BEST PATIO
MONDAYS
$1.50 DOMESTIC
MICROBREWS ON TAP
TUESDAYS & WEDNESDAYS
LATE NICHT HAPPY HOUR
BUY ONE PIZZA OR APPETIZER
GET ONE FREE
FROM 10 PM TIL 1:00 AM
THURSDAYS
$2.50 IMPORTS ON TAP
SUNDAYS
ALL BOTTLES OF WINE */> PRICE
! !
WOOD FIRED VIZI A
! COMPLIMENTARY |
APPETIZER
WITH DINNER
FOR TWO
EXPIRES 3/31/04
|brixx|— l 3 L
1 i \
\ To
Hwy 54 | s \ Durham
ToUNC 1
Campus 1
MON-SAT 11 AM to 1 AM
SUNDAYS 11 AM to 11 PM
919.929.1942
WWW.BRIXXPIZZA.COM
5
    

Page Text

This is the computer-generated OCR text representation of this newspaper page. It may be empty, if no text could be automatically recognized. This data is also available in Plain Text and XML formats.

Return to page view