North Carolina Newspapers

    VOLUME 112, ISSUE 12
UNC proposes development changes
UNC NEWS SERVICES/JUSTIN SMITH
Director of Facilities Planning Anna Wu discusses UNC's second development
plan modification application, submitted to the Town Council on Monday.
Hike vote
unlikely to
be delayed
BOG members say Earley
budget won't affect plans
BY KAVITA PILLAI
STAFF WRITER
As the two-month debate on tuition increases
draws to a close, members of the UNC-system
Board of Governors expressed doubt Monday that
higher education needs can be met any other way.
BOG members, who are scheduled to vote on
the tuition hikes Friday, indicated in interviews
that they will do whatever is necessary to maintain
and improve the caliber of state universities, even
if that means approving the tuition increase pro
posals of individual campuses.
“I’m concerned that the pace of erosion of qual
ity within the university is at an unacceptable
level,” BOG chairman Brad Wilson said. “The only
means by which the BOG can address issues like
ever-increasing class size and ever-fewer sections
of core classes is to consider campus-based tuition
requests.”
The Friday vote would take place despite a call
from the UNC-system Association of Student
Governments to delay the vote until after Gov.
Mike Easley can make his budget proposal. Wilson
said a delay is unnecessary and expressed doubt
that the budget will allow for significant increas
es in higher education funding.
“While the state budget might see some large
improvement, it’s not going to be large enough to
make a dramatic difference in the decision we
SEE BOG, PAGE 5
N.C. senator
advocates
tuition hikes
BY LAURA YOUNGS
ASSISTANT STATE & NATIONAL EDITOR
Support for UNC-system campus-based tuition
increases received a boost last week from a key N.C.
legislator, but some still warn that the increases
could have a negative impact on students.
In a letter to members of the
UNC-system Board of
Governors, Senate President
Pro Tem Marc Basnight, D-
Dare, threw his support behind
the proposed increases. The let
ter stated that in North
Carolina’s tough economic
times, the quality of education
cannot be compromised.
“Our campuses have a long
tradition of offering a high
quality education at an afford
able cost,” Basnight stated in the
letter. “But to ensure success for
N.C. Sen.
Marc Basnight
emphasized the
quality of N.C.
universities.
all students, we must continue to pair affordabili
ty with quality.”
BOG members are scheduled to vote Friday on
campus-initiated increases for the 16 UNC-system
schools. They also are set to vote on proposals for
a systemwide increase. Should the measures pass,
the proposals will move to the N.C. General
Assembly for final consideration.
SEE BASNIGHT, PAGE 5
INSIDE
K-9 COP
The UNC Department of Public Safety adds a canine
unit to provide extra safety at large events PAGE 3
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Daniel Wallace, author of the novel Big Fish, recently made
into a movie, signs a copy of his book Monday night at
Panzanella restaurant in Carrboro after speaking at the
Orange County Literacy Council fund-raiser. A UNC alumnus,
Wallace at one time worked as the assistant director for the OCLC
Deal to bring Dells to masses
BY KELLI BORBET
STAFF WRITER
The Dell University Program is
now offering a Dell desktop com
puter and printer for less than
SSOO to all employees or students
at any higher education institution
in North Carolina.
The UNC Employee Forum
Computer Initiative worked with
Dell to provide a basic, affordable
and functional computer system
for workers and students in col
leges in North Carolina, said Ernie
Patterson, a forum delegate and
network systems manager in the
Department of Biology.
The basic desktop package being
offered for $499 includes a com
puter with CD-ROM, a 40GB hard
drive, a 17-inch monitor and a
printer that also serves as a scanner
and a copier.
The computer also includes
built-in ethemet and modem ports.
The modem also can be used as a
fax machine. Several software pro
grams are also available, including
a basic version of Microsoft Office
and Windows XP, Microsoft’s latest
operating system.
A basic laptop also is being
offered without a printer for about
$875.
Patterson said the forum’s long
term goal is to keep providing the
www.dailytaiheel.com
MOVE COMES DESPITE TOWN REQUEST
TO WAIT FOR MORE TALKS ON ZONING
BY EMMA BIIRGIN
CITY EDITOR
The University submitted an application
Monday to Chapel Hill for approval of as
much as $145 million in modifications to its
development plan despite the town’s request
that UNC halt all applications until the two
entities ironed out disagreements over zoning.
UNC delivered its application after Mayor
Kevin Foy and the Chapel Hill Town Council
asked earlier this month for a pause in devel
opment to discuss Office/Institutional-4 zon
ing. “We did take a serious look at that request,”
said Nancy Suttenfield, UNC vice chancellor
for finance and administration. “But it’s neither
fiscally responsible nor practical.”
The University’s six requested changes are
in an 01-4 zoning district, so the University
must submit special impact reports along
“We want to make sure that people are
getting the best computers for the money”
KATHERINE GRAVES, UNC EMPLOYEE FORUM VICE CHAIRWOMAN
desktop for SSOO and one day to
have a laptop available for SBOO.
“We wanted to give people an
opportunity to buy a computer that
couldn’t really afford one with the
most modern technology,”
Patterson said.
A majority of University employ
ees who responded to a survey said
they believed that they realistically
would be able to purchase a com
puter that costs about SSOO, he said.
The forum sent a proposal to
three different computer vendors
and only Dell responded with a
basic beginning package.
“We are willing to still take offers
from other vendors,” Patterson
said. “Dell was just the only one
that responded with a proposed
package.”
Katherine Graves, vice chair
woman of the forum, said the pack
age offered by Dell will be reviewed
in six months to see if any revisions
need to be made.
“We want to make sure that peo
ple are getting the best computers
for the money,” Graves said. “It is
m
with its application.
The modifications include relocating a
planned 10,000-ton chiller plant and 600
parking spaces from the Science Complex to
the Bell Tower parking lot across South Road.
University officials also asked for a
130,000-square-foot addition to the N.C.
Clinical Cancer Center and a 28,000-square
foot addition to Fetzer Gym that will provide
office and clinical space for student athletes.
Town Manager Cal Horton said his staff
has not determined whether the application
is complete, so the 90-day review period
required by 01-4 regulations has yet to begin.
Complaints from residents about the
impact of 01-4’s expedited review process
prompted the council to request the halt to
development plan changes.
But Suttenfield said some of the projects
JOHN HANCOCK
and helped place illiterate adults with volunteer tutors. The OCLC
was founded in 1984 with the mission of eliminating adult illiter
acy in Orange County. Its services include free tutoring in read
ing and family reading workshops. Aided by Smart Start funds,
these workshops encourage parents to read to their children.
just such an advantage to have your
own personal computer.”
Patterson said that although the
computers are being offered at
lower prices, he doesn’t think there
will be any competition with the
IBM computers contracted for the
Carolina Computing Initiative.
“The CCI computers are very
high tech and powerful machines,”
Patterson said. “The Dell comput
ers will provide just a basic com
puter for people who couldn’t nor
mally afford one.”
In a press release, Employee
Forum Chairman Tommy Griffin
stated that in today’s society people
without regular computer access
are at a tremendous disadvantage
when it comes to accessing infor
mation and learning new job skills.
“Our hope at the UNC Employee
Forum is that this initiative will help
level the playing field for the people
who need it most, not just here at
Carolina, but around the state.”
Contact the University Editor
at udesk@unc.edu.
SPORTS
CLEAN SWEEP
Defending national champion Florida beats the Tar
Heels for the Gators' 28th consecutive win PAGE 9
TUESDAY, MARCH 16, 2004
are “extremely time-sensitive,” and delays
could have a domino effect on projects
already approved by the town. “Each project
is related in some way to the others,” she said.
Suttenfield said that UNC officials would
like to see all projects approved within the 90
days allotted by 01-4 but that they are willing
to take more time with changes that might
draw intense community interest.
University officials also cited funding as a
justification for ignoring the town’s request.
“Most of the projects are funded by public
money,” Suttenfield said. “We are held
accountable by the taxpayers to make respon
sible use of the funds the public gives to us.”
“All the money goes to projects in fixed
amounts. Any delay leaves actually less dol
lars for completed projects.”
The University submitted revised impact
reports Monday for factors such as traffic,
noise and stormwater usage. Suttenfield said
these studies come at a cost to development
SEE CHANGES, PAGE 5 ‘
UNC student in
Madrid reacts
to bomb attacks
BY NIKKI WERKING
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
The trains and stations along Madrid’s commuter
rail lines overflowed with people Friday, two days
after 10 backpack bombs exploded on a busy section
of the lines, killing about 200 people.
Sandy Sulzer, a UNC sophomore studying in
Madrid this semester, couldn’t move in the sea of
people. Admission to the rail lines was free for the
day to allow mourning for the victims of Europe’s
deadliest terrorist attack since the 1988 bombing
of a Pan American Airlines jetliner over Lockerbie,
Scotland.
“People absolutely packed the stations,” she said.
“When you finally did get to the train, you couldn’t
get on. The cars were absolutely crammed full of
people. People had their faces pressed against the
glass.”
On that same day, two major vigils were held in
Madrid. At noon Friday, Sulzer said, people poured
into the streets for 15 minutes of silence. At 7 p.m.,
2.5 million people gathered again in the streets,
halting traffic even on the city’s outer highways.
“I’ve never seen anything like it,” Sulzer said.
When the explosions first occurred Wednesday
morning, the magnitude of the event didn’t hit
Sulzer. When she heard the first accounts of die
bombing on her way to her internship that morning
30 people were dead and officials were estimating a
SEE MADRID, PAGE 5
WEATHER
TODAY Rain, H 58, L 37
WEDNESDAY Partly cloudy, H 57, L 36
THURSDAY Sunny, H 64, L 51
DTH/NANCY DONALDSON
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